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  • Cases - 案例 - Casos

  • Teaching Collaboration: Collaborative public management, networks, governance, and problem solving have become essential topics in most public management and public policy programs. One of the best ways to prepare students to operate in a collaborative world is through the use of case studies, simulations, and negotiation exercises. These resources were designed for use in teaching collaboration skills, and were selected through an annual competition sponsored by the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC) at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University.

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    Adoption of Technology Open Standards Policy by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

    This case details the political and administrative process of adopting and implementing an IT Open Standards Policy in Massachusetts during Gov. Mitt Romney's administration. It prompts students to explore concepts that form the foundation of open government in the digital age, such as open standards, total cost of ownership, and key (and often misunderstood) distinctions between free/libre and open source, commercial and proprietary software, and the challenges of vendor lock-in. AUTHORS: Charles Schweik and Lucia N. Miller, Center for Public Policy and Administration, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2013
     

    Building a Healthy Community

    As funding agencies increasingly focus on community-based projects, they often have clear ideas of how these processes should unfold. This case presents recurrent points of tension around resident representation in a community planning process and highlights important junctures where barriers to resident inclusion are confronted. AUTHORS: Victoria Lowerson and Martha S. Feldman, University of California, Irvine. First Place Award, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2012

     

    Collaboration Amid Crisis: The Department of Defense During Hurricane Katrina

    Using the context of Hurricane Katrina, this case examines the relationship between FEMA, the chief coordinator of federal response efforts, and the most powerful, single actor that FEMA can call upon, the Department of Defense. AUTHOR: Donald P. Moynihan, University of Madison, Wisconsin. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2008

     

    Collaboration Gone Awry: A Struggle for Power and Control over Service Delivery in the Nonprofit Sector

    In this case, entitled "The Action Committee Collaboration Initiative," several nonprofit and government agencies struggle as they come together to develop and implement a streamline first response for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. AUTHORS: Melissa Brazil and Eli Teram, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2009

     

    Collaboration for Civic Change: Connecting High-Tech Growth and Community Well-Being

    This case involves nonprofit, business, government, and education leaders in efforts to link social and economic development, connecting high-tech growth and community well-being. It addresses collaboration across sectors responding to new economic conditions within a geographic region. AUTHORS: Susan Appe and Judith R. Saidel, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, State University of New York, Albany. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2009

     

    Collaborative Strategy for Organizational Survival

    Public managers face strategic management challenges in this case, as they attempt to “grow” a new collaborative public organization that is embedded in the federal government and focused on environmental conflict. AUTHOR: Rob Alexander, Maxwell School of Syracuse University. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2007

     

    Community Engagement for Organizational Change

    A newly hired City of Seattle Arts Director faces the challenge of engaging community stakeholders to develop a long-term financial and organizational strategy for a venerable city-run cultural and arts center. The case provides the opportunity for students to articulate what constitutes ethical stewardship, community engagement, and participatory decision-making, particularly in settings in which racial inclusion, equity, and social justice are at stake.  Author: Alexandra Wakeman Rouse, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Washington, Advisor: Dr. Stephen Page, Associate Professor, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Washington.  First Place Award,Best Teaching Case 2016. 

     

    Elusive Community in South Park

    This case focuses on concepts that public officials and non-governmental professionals must understand in order to represent their organization and offer services effectively. “Inclusion” skills enable public managers to cultivate public participation in fractious communities, where traditional methods of citizen involvement such as public notices and hearings may be ineffective. AUTHOR: Denise Rodriguez, University of Washington. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2008

     

    Facilitating a Public Policy Issue: Practicing Textbook Tools and Confronting Challenges That Textbooks Don’t

    Supported by videos excerpted from televised broadcasts of public meetings of a diverse, eighteen-person citizen task force, students learn to facilitate by anticipating and critiquing the tactics of the task for chair who is attempting to secure a consensus.  The task force is advising the City Council about a proposal from the owner of the minor league soccer and baseball teams to purchase a Major League Soccer franchise if the City reconfigures the existing stadium for soccer and builds a new stadium for baseball.  AUTHORS: Steven M. Maser, Atkinson Graduate School of Management, Williamette University and Samuel J. Imperati of the Institute for Conflict Management, Inc., with thanks to Jessica Ordonez of Apicality Communication, LLC.  Honorable Mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2015. 

     

    From Alliance to International: The Global Transformation of Save the Children

    This case examines how leaders in Save the Children, a large International NGO were driven to consider major organizational transformation, how they created a sense of urgency around the case for change, and how they created a coalition for change. It also illustrates implementation issues that may arise when large INGOs undergo significant transformation, and points to signals of early results. AUTHORS: Steven J Lux and Tosca Maria Bruno-VanVijfeijken, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University. Snow Foundation Award for Best Case or Simulation in Collaborative Nonprofit Management, 2013.
     

    Guardian Ad Litem of Madison County

    Examining the conflict surrounding a nonprofit organization that attempts to separate into two independent agencies, this case focuses on the negotiations and obstacles to a successful transition. AUTHORS: Trent A. Engbers, Indiana University, and Kristin Bishay, Monroe County Court Appointed Special Advocates Inc. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2011

     

    HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Education Utilizing the Tools of Collaborative Governance or Why is a 545-Mile Bicycle Ride A Case Study of Collaborative Governance?

    This case study examines how AIDS/LifeCycle, a 7-day, 545-mile bicycle ride down the California coastline, is an exceptional example of effective nonprofit management and fundraising, successful collaborative governance, social networking, service co-production via both fundraising and volunteer service delivery, and social capital building.  AUTHOR: Mark W. Davis, Department of Public Policy and Administration, West Chester University of Pennsylvania.  Honorable Mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2016.
     

    Health Careers Institute Collaboration

    In the face of a neighborhood's deterioration, business, governmental, philanthropic, educational, and nonprofit organizations form two cross-sector networks, only one of which succeeds. This case prompts readers to think critically about the factors that stimulate collaborative networks, the type of leadership that they need, and the challenge of sustaining networks. AUTHORS: Jay Kiedrowski and Allison Rojas, University of Minnesota. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2007

     

    Implementing the Earned Income Tax Credit at AccountAbility Minnesota

    This case highlights the leadership and management of a small nonprofit organization responding to predatory financial products targeted at the very customers served by the organization. A growing problem, a small organization, the risks involved and limited investment capital. AUTHOR: Jodi Sandfort, Humphrey School, University of Minnesota. Snow Foundation Award for Best Case or Simulation in Collaborative Nonprofit Management, 2011

     

    Inclusive Management: Planning 'Green Grand Rapids'

    As public managers collaborate with the public on a major city-wide environmental initiative, this case engages students in the process of decision-making and distribution of resources for a system of parks and recreation facilities. AUTHORS: Kathryn S. Quick and Martha S. Feldman, University of California, Irvine. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2007

     

    Indiana Household Hazardous Waste Task Force

    The case is a historical chronology built around three primary projects completed by the Household Hazardous Waste Task Force in the State of Indiana. Based on real events the case is designed to present an example where multiple agencies, in the public sector, not-for-profit sector, and private sector work in a collaborative fashion to solve a problem that none of them would likely have been able to solve as a single agency. While many teaching cases focus on “the problem at hand,” this case study focuses on a series of three program successes. AUTHORS: Mark Davis and Danielle Varda, University of Colorado. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2011
     

    Kujichagulia: Actively Building a Public-Nonprofit Community Partnership

    How does a government organization engage a cultural community to reform service delivery for disadvantaged citizens? This case demonstrates how giving a cultural community an active role in addressing their problems requires a fundamental shift in the way government does business. It also provides a glimpse into the challenges of collaborative management in two organizations with dramatically different goals and methods of going about their work. AUTHORS: Catherine Eichers Penkert, Nicholas Dobbins, and Jodi Sandfort, University of Minnesota. First Place, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2008

     

    Leading IslandWood

    In the context of an outdoor education nonprofit startup organization, this case demonstrates how managers who arrive in new positions with the aim and intention of making significant change face challenges that require the practice of strategies to effectively navigate the political, operational, and authorizing environments in which they find themselves. The case communicates the quandary of managers who aim to bring an organization’s ambitious vision to reality and the techniques they must learning to systematic ally determine its direction and priorities. AUTHORS: David Cook and Lauren Guzauskas, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs, University of Washington. Snow Foundation Award for Best Case or Simulation in Collaborative Nonprofit Management, 2012

     

    Managing a Public-Private Joint Venture: The PTB Case

    What happens when a regional savings bank and local government partner to stimulate and foster economic activities and initiatives? This case focuses on the interaction between private and public sides of the partnership and on the difficulties which can arise when collaborating across sectors. AUTHORS: Angel Saz-Carranza and Albert Serra, Institute of Public Governance and Manage, ESADE-Ramon Llull University, Barcelona, Spain. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2009

     

    New Funding, New Beginnings: To Collaborate or Not to Collaborate

    As donors shift the focus of their funding, nongovernmental organizations must respond. This case presents recurrent challenges NGOs face in their work and highlights important management and governance issues that are impacted by shifts in funding, including collaboration as a strategic option. AUTHORS: Khaldoun AbouAssi, Bush School of Government and Public Service, Texas A&M University, and Catherine Herrold, Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Third Place Award, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2014

     

    Oltre La Norma! Collaborating for the Reconstruction of Teatro Petruzzelli in Bari

    When the Petruzzelli Theatre in Bari, Italy, was destroyed by arson in 1991, people in the public and private sectors, representing profit and nonprofit organizations at the local and national level, took part in the public debate on about next steps and possible ways of funding the rebuilding of the theater. This case helps students explore the methods used for the construction of collaborative processes or governance and to discuss the skills of the manager in the public sector who will manage the network of people involved. AUTHORS: Ornella Larenza, Alex Turrini, and Greta Nasi, SDA Bocconi School of Management, Bocconi University. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2013
     

    Place to Call Home: Addressing Dublin’s Homelessness

    As services for the homeless evolved in Dublin, Ireland, from 1990 to 2010, complex policy and organizational issues arose. Provision of services by a number of voluntary, nonprofit organizations, as well as state agencies, resulted in an uncoordinated and uneven response. This case challenges students to assess what options are open to policy makers, government agencies and service organizations as they strive to meet the objective of ending homelessness. AUTHORS: Mary-Lee Rhodes and Gemma Donnelly Cox, Trinity College Dublin, and Ann Torres, National University of Ireland, Galway. First Place Award, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2013
     

    Politics of Structuring Interorganizational Collaboration and the Selection of 'Good Clients'

    In the context of a network of organizations that work with troubled youth, this case challenges students to think more critically about interorganizational collaboration. Specifically, it provides an opportunity to understand the politics of structuring interorganizational relations, and to sensitize students to the way seemingly rational interorganizational arrangements may mask processes that serve organizational interests by facilitating the selection of "good clients." AUTHOR: Eli Teram, Wilfrid Laurier University. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2012

     

    The Edwards Aquifer

    The Edwards Aquifer case provides a historical overview of one of the most contentious water disputes in the United States.  The case provides an in-depth analysis of how this entrenched, 70 year old water dispute was ultimately resolved through a consensus-based, multi-stakeholder, collaborative process. AUTHORS: Adam Zerrenner, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Austin Office; and Robert Gulley, Texas Comptroller's Office and Adjunct Professor at Texas State University.  Honorable Mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2016.  

     

    The End of Diversity Policy? Wake County Public Schools and Student Assignment

    The diversity policy, adopted by Wake County Public Schools in 2000, was instated to achieve socioeconomic diversity in the district's schools. The policy required schools to have no more than 40 percent of students on free or reduced lunch status and no more than 25 percent of students achieving below grade level.  In the spring of 2010, the Wake County Board of Education voted to end the diversity policy, claiming the policy was the cause of disruptive long-distance busing and school instability for students.  AUTHORS: Jenni Owen and Megan Kauffmann, Sanford School of Public Policy and Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University. First Place Winner, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2015.  
     

    Trust as an Asset: Building a Managed Service Organization within MACC

    Through the example of the Metropolitan Alliance of Community Centers (MACC), a coalition of human service organizations in the twin cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, this case highlights the dynamics of inter-organizational relationships — the dual tracks of collaboration, those which emphasizes the human process of developing shared values and trust, the those which emphasizes the technical management skills needed when developing innovations that stretch across organizational boundaries. AUTHORS: Jodi Sandfort and Timothy Dykstal, University of Minnesota. First Place Winner, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2007

     

    When a Highway Divides a City: Improving Decision Making in Syracuse, New York

    This case centers on Syracuse, New York, which is polarized over a critical transportation infrastructure question. Interstate 81, running through the heart of downtown, is rapidly deteriorating, and deciding what to do about the aging Interstate is a vexing problem that challenges lawmakers, planning officials, and citizens to make many decisions affecting their community. AUTHOR: Jack Becker, Maxwell School, Syracuse University. Second Place Award, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2014

     
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