Maxwell School

Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn

Professor, History

ElisabethLasch_Quinn

Contact Information

EDLasch@maxwell.syr.edu

322 Eggers Hall
(315) 443-2700

Office Hours:
Not teaching this semester

Senior Research Associate, Campbell Public Affairs Institute
Senior Research Associate, Campbell Public Affairs Institute

Degree

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1990

Specialties

Modern American social, cultural, intellectual history; social/political thought; cultural criticism; public philosophy; ethics; democracy; civil society; race; family

Publications

Books:

Race Experts: How Racial Etiquette, Sensitivity Training, and New Age Therapy Hijacked the Civil Rights Revolution (W. W. Norton and Co., 2001). Reviewed in New York Times, Times Literary Supplement (London), London Telegraph, Washington Post, etc.
Race Experts: How Racial Etiquette, Sensitivity Training, and New Age Therapy Hijacked the Civil Rights Revolution (Rowman and Littlefield, 2002). Paperback re-issue.
Black Neighbors: Race and the Limits of Reform in the American Settlement House Movement, 1890-1945 (University of North Carolina Press, 1993). Annual Book Award Winner, Berkshire Conference of Women Historians.

Edited Books:

Reconstructing History: The Emergence of a New Historical Society, with Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, essays on the study of history and the historical profession (Routledge, 1999).
Women and the Common Life: Love, Marriage, and Feminism, essays by historian Christopher Lasch (New York: W.W. Norton, 1997).

Articles and Review Essays

Review essay on parenting, including the “mommy wars” and “hyper-parenting,” Boston Review (forthcoming fall 2007). In progress.

“Contemporary Social Thought,” book chapter in progress for Martin Halliwell and Catherine Morley, eds., American Thought and Culture in the Twenty-first Century (NY: Columbia University Press, forthcoming fall 2008). Simultaneous UK publication by Edinburgh University Press. In progress.

“Democratic Self-Discipline and the Moral Market: An Alternative to Current Approaches to Diversity,” article/book chapter in progress for Yitzhak Fried, Diversity as a Competitive Advantage: A Theoretical and Empirical Examination (publisher under negotiation for projected fall 2007/spring 2008 publication). In progress.

“The Mind of the Moralist,” on Philip Rieff’s My Life among the Deathworks: Illustrations of the Aesthetics of Authority, in The New Republic, (August 28, 2006), 27-31. Excerpted as “Philip Rieff, R.I.P.” in Insight, Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture, 15 (Fall 2006): 4.

“Introduction” to Philip Rieff’s Triumph of the Therapeutic: Uses of Faith after Freud (Wilmington, Delaware: ISI Publishing, 2006); new critical edition.

“A Stranger’s Dream: The Contemporary Socialization Crisis and the Rise of the Virtual Self,” in Wilfred M. McClay, ed., Figures in the Carpet: Finding the Human Person in the American Past (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdman’s, 2007). Also excerpted in Historically Speaking.

“The Crisis of Secularism,” essay/book chapter in Dolan Cummings, ed., Debating Humanism (Imprint Academic, 2006).

“Identity Crisis,” New Humanist (Great Britain) 121, 1 (January/February 2006): 20-21.

“Thinking of Shopping as Work: How Our Consumer Culture is Robbing Us of Time for the Best Things in Life,” Op ed, New York Newsday, July 24, 2005, p. A57.

Essay on the State of American Intellectual Life, response to George Cotkin’s “The Democratization of Cultural Criticism,” H-IDEAS Virtual Symposium, April 28-29.

“Engaged Resistance” and “Obscenity Culture,” in Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, ed., Encyclopedia of Children, Adolescents, and the Media, Sage Reference, 2007.

“The Personal History of America’s Great Historian,” review essay on John Hope Franklin’s Mirror to America in Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (Winter 2005/6): 108-111.

“A Thumb on the Scale: The Case for Greater Equity in College Admissions,” review essay on William G. Bowen, Martin A. Kurzweil, and Eugene M. Tobin, Equity and Excellence in American Higher Education in Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (Summer 2005): 122-125.

“Liberation Therapeutics: From Moral Renewal to Consciousness-Raising,” in Therapeutic Culture: Triumph and Defeat (New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 2004), 3-18.

“An American Idol,” review essay on three new biographies of Harriet Tubman, Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (Summer 2004).

“Religious Settlements,” encyclopedia entry, Journal of Chicago History (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, summer 2004).

“Color Bind,” review of Debra Dickerson, The End of Blackness, The Washington Post, January 18, 2004.

“Socializing Children in the Culture of Obscenity,” in Kids’ Stuff: Marketing Violence and Violence to America’s Children, edited by Diane Ravitch and Joseph P. Viteritti (essay collection, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2003), 39-64.

“Bringing Up Baby,” Wilson Quarterly (Spring 2003), 109-112. Review essay on the history of childrearing (featured in Anne Geske, “Land of the Lost Parents,” Utne Reader, December 2003, 74).

“Das Zeitalter der Manipulation,” Novo [German magazine of politics and culture] (March-April 2003), 39. Reprint with my permission of “The Age of Manipulation,” opinion piece which appeared originally in Spiked.com, a British internet journal (see below).

“The Age of Manipulation,” Arts and Letters Daily, an online service of The Chronicle of Higher Education (January 16, 2003). Another reprint of the Spiked.com piece below.

“A Woman’s Place is Home,” Washington Times (March 2, 2003), Book Section Front Page and B7. Review of Phyllis Schlafly’s Feminist Fantasies.

“Love That Lasts Isn’t Star-struck,” Syracuse Post-Standard (February 16, 2003). One of the reprints of “Let’s Fall in Love with Being in Love” below.

“Let’s Fall in Love with Being in Love,” Op ed piece on intimacy, New York Newsday November 17, 2002. This solicited piece went to the Washington Post-LA Times news service and was reprinted in several other newspapers, including the Honolulu Advertiser (November 24, 2002, Section B), Daytona Beach News-Journal, Vancouver Sun, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (November 26, 2002).

“The Age of Manipulation,” opinion piece, Spiked.com (a British internet journal), 12 December 2002. This piece was reprinted in Arts and Letters Daily, a service of The Chronicle of Higher Education, January 16, 2003.

“Markets and Morals,” Review of Kevin Phillips, Wealth and Democracy, in The Washington Times (July 21, 2002).

“Loving and Leaving,” Extended Review Essay on Marriage and Divorce, On Judith Wallerstein, The Unexpected Legacy of Divorce, Nancy Cott, Public Vows, and Hendrik Hartog, Man and Wife in America, in The New Republic (May 6, 2002), 42-54.

Transcript Commentary, Symposium on Afro-America at the Start of a New Century (the work of Orlando Patterson), Salmagundi (Winter-Spring 2002), 83-238.

“No Bad Deeds?” Review of Elliott Turiel, The Culture of Morality, in The Washington Times (April 28, 2002).

“Liberation Therapeutics: Consciousness-Raising, Manipulation, and the Engineering of Attitudes,” Society (March/April 2002; based on Therapeutic Society conference below, fall 2001), 7-15. Forthcoming in book of essays, Transaction Publishers, late 2004.

“Family,” in Mary Kupiec Cayton and Peter W. Williams, eds., Encyclopedia of American Cultural and Intellectual History, vol. 3 (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2001), 73-82.

“Crime is Rising and Our Justice System Falters,” On David Garland’s The Culture of Control, in The Washington Times (July 8, 2001), B8, B6.

“The Law and Our Favorite Tales,” On Anthony Amsterdam and Jerome Bruner, Minding the Law, in The Washington Times (November 5, 2000), B8, B7.

“How the Truth Gets Lost and Our Moral Bearings Blurred in the Culture Wars,” On James Davison Hunter, The Death of Character: Moral Education in an Age Without Good or Evil, in The Washington Times (September 24, 2000), B8, B7.

“Dionysus and Jim Crow,” On Orlando Patterson’s Rituals of Blood and Mia Bay’s The White Image in The Black Mind in The New Republic (August 28 and September 4, 2000).

“Democracy Should Not Have Losers,” A Reply to Jim Chen’s “Globalization and Its Losers,” Minnesota Journal of Global Trade 9, 2 (Summer 2000): 589-593.

“Critic Attacks Reading Scripture, Law Too Narrowly, But Misses Target,” On Vincent Crapanzano, Serving the Word, in The Washington Times (March 26, 2000).

“Mothers and Markets,” On Sonya Michel’s Children’s Interests/Mothers’ Rights, William Epstein’s Children Who Could Have Been, and Mona Harrington’s Care and Equality in The New Republic, February, 2000).

“Finding Moral Fault Line in How We Think and Act in Civil Society,” On Gertrude Himmelfarb, One Nation, Two Cultures, in The Washington Times (November 28, 1999).

“How to Behave Sensitively: Prescriptions for Interracial Conduct From the 1960s to the 1990s,” (Journal of Social History, Winter 1999).

“Democracy in the Ivory Tower? Toward the Restoration of an Intellectual Community,” in Elizabeth Fox-Genovese and Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn, eds., Reconstructing History: The Emergence of a New Historical Society (Routledge, 1999).

“Decoding the Latest Utterance from an Oracle of Literary Theory,” On Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, A Critique of Postcolonial Reason, in The Washington Times (May 30, 1999).

“Looking Back on the ‘Age of Aquarius’: The 1960s Revisited,” On Arthur Marwick, The Sixties, in The Washington Times (January 10, 1999).

“The Kindness of Strangers,” On Timothy Hasci’s Second Home: Orphan Asylums and Poor Families in America (The New Republic, December 1998).

“There’s No Time Like the Present? Civic Life in the United States,” On Michael Schudson, The Good Citizen, in The Washington Times (September 27, 1998).

“The Closing of the American Mind? The Future of Education,” On Alan Ryan, Liberal Anxieties, in The Washington Times (August 30, 1998).

“Mugged By Reality: The Legacy of Leftism in America,” On Richard Rorty, Achieving Our Country, in The Washington Times (May 10, 1998).

“Dorothea Dix and Mental Health Reform,” in Paul Cimbala and Randall Miller, eds., American Reform and Reformers (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996), REPRINTED in Paul Cimbala and Randall Miller, eds., Women Against the Tide: Women Reformers in American Society (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997).

“Progressives and the Pursuit of Agency,” On Molly Ladd-Taylor’s Mother-Work and Mary Odem’s Delinquent Daughters (Reviews in American History, June 1997).

“Radical Chic and the Rise of a Therapeutics of Race” (Salmagundi, Winter, 1996).

“Children Under the Expert Eye: The Rise of Child Development Science” (Reviews in American History, June 1994).

Shorter Reviews:

Of Peter Stearns, Battleground of Desire (The Journal of Social History, Summer 2001).

Of Judith Weisenfeld, African American Women and Christian Activism: New York’s Black YWCA, 1905-1945 (Journal of American History, September 2000).

Of Daniel Horowitz, Betty Friedan and the Making of the Feminine Mystique (The Wilson Quarterly, Spring 1999).

Of Juan Williams, Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary (The Wilson Quarterly, Winter 1999).

Of Patricia Ireland’s Autobiography, What Women Want (UTNE Reader, June/July 1996).

Of Andrew Hurley’s Environmental Inequalities: Class, Race, and Industrial Pollution in Gary, Indiana, 1945-1980 (Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Summer 1996).

Of W. Dennis Keating’s The Suburban Racial Dilemma: Housing and Neighborhoods (Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, March 1996).

Of Malaika Adero, ed., Up South (Georgia Historical Quarterly, Summer 1995).

Of Robert Dykstra’s Bright Radical Star: Black Freedom and White Supremacy on the Hawkeye Frontier (Annals of the Academy of Political and Social Science, Summer 1995).

Of Carl Nightingale’s On the Edge: Poor Black Children and Their American Dreams (History of Education Quarterly, Spring 1995).

Of Marsha Wedell’s Elite Women and the Reform Impulse in Memphis, 1875-1915 (Journal American History, December 1992).  

Teaching Appointments

2002-Present: Professor, Syracuse University
2001-Present: Senior Research Associate: Campbell Public Affairs Institute, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University
1998-1999: Fellow, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, DC
1996-Present: Associate Professor, Syracuse University
1990-1995: Assistant Professor, Syracuse University
Courses taught at Syracuse University, 1990-continuing:
History 108: United States History Since 1865
History 300: United States Intellectual History since Peirce
History 300: Liberalism and Conservatism in Recent American
Thought
History 321 and 322 (later renumbered History 334 and 335):
American Social and Cultural History to the Civil War
American Social and Cultural History since the Civil War
History 301: History: Fact and Interpretation/Race in America since
1960
History 400: Contemporary Schools of Thought
History 401: Undergraduate Research Seminars:
New York Intellectuals
Race in America Since 1960
Reform in America
Oral History of Race and Reform
Women and American Culture
History 302: American Women’s History
History 715: Graduate Readings Courses:
Modernity and Morality
Race in America Since 1960
American Reform Movements Since 1865
American Social and Cultural History
Dissertation Preparation
History 804: American History Seminar
1994: Visiting Assistant Professor, Yale University
Graduate Readings and Research Seminar:
Interracial Reform and Modern American Culture
1993-1994: Visiting Research Fellow, Whitney Humanities Center, Yale University
1989-1990: Instructor, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
U.S. History to 1876 (seminar & lecture)
1988-1989: Teaching Assistant, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
U.S. History Since 1876
U.S. Culture in the Twentieth Century
1986-1988: Research Fellow, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
1987: Instructor, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
U.S. History Since 1876; U.S. History to 1876
1985-1986: Teaching Assistant, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
U.S. History to 1876; U.S. History in the 1960s
1985: Instructor, Vermont Community College
U.S. History, Colonial Period to the Present
U.S. Character and Culture
1983: Co-Instructor, University of Vermont
Graduate Seminar:
History of Women in the Nineteenth Century U.S.
1982-1984: Teaching Assistant, University of Vermont
U.S. History to 1865
U.S. History Since 1865
Recent U.S. Social History
Women’s History  

Research Interests

Twentieth-Century American Social, Cultural, and Intellectual History

Research Grants and Awards

2006: Pigott Faculty Deveopment Fund research grant, History Department,
Syracuse University
2006: Summer Project Grant, Office of Sponsored Research, Maxwell School,
Syracuse University
2001-2004: Grant Stipend/Participation in Research Project on the “Human Person,”PEW Foundation
2003: Grant for Research and Appointment as Research Fellow, Center for the
Study of Popular Television, S. I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University
2002: Promoted to Full Professor, Syracuse University
2002: Grant for Research, Appleby Mosher Fund, Syracuse University
2001: Grant for Research, Appleby Mosher Fund, Syracuse University
2000: Nominated for candidacy for fellowship; Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University (under review)
2000: Grant for Research, Office of Research and Computing, Syracuse University
2000: Grant for Research, Appleby Mosher Fund, Syracuse University
1998-99: Fellowship, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
1998-99: Fellowship, National Humanities Center (declined)
1998: Research Grant, Center for Policy Research, Syracuse University
1996: Awarded Tenure, Syracuse University
1995: Promoted to Associate Professor, Syracuse University
1994: Berkshire Conference for Women Historians’ Annual Book Award, for Black Neighbors
1993: Moynihan Award for Junior Faculty, For Excellence in Teaching, Research, and Service, Maxwell School of Citizenship
1993-94: Visiting Fellowship, Whitney Humanities Center, Yale University
1993-94: Research Grant, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe College
1993-94: Research Grant, Rockefeller Archives Center
1993-94: Grant for Research, Appleby-Mosher Fund, Syracuse University
1993-94: Faculty Research Grant, Syracuse University
1992: Lerner-Scott Award—Finalist
1991: Small Grants Research Award, Syracuse University
1991: Nevins Dissertation Prize—Nominated
1991: Grant for Research, Appleby-Mosher Fund, Syracuse University
1988: Research Grant, Center for the Study of Philanthropy, City University of
New York
1988: Henry J. Kaiser Research Grant, Walter Reuther Library of Labor and
Urban Affairs, Wayne State University
1987-88: University Fellowship, University of Massachusetts
1986-87: University Fellowship, University of Massachusetts
1987: Distinction, Doctoral Oral Exam
1985: Best M.A. Thesis Award, Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools  

Selected Professional Activities

2007-continuing: Member, Advisory Editorial Board, Society
2007-continuing: Director of Graduate Studies, History Department, Syracuse University
2007-continuing: Panelist, National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship competition
2007-continuing: Chair, Tenure and Promotion Committee, Subho Basu, History Department, Syracuse University
2007-continuing: Chair, American History Search Committee, History Department, Syracuse University
2007-continuing: Member, Tolley Professorship in the Humanities Committee, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University
2007-continuing: Co-organizer, Lecture Series on the State of Democracy, Campbell Public Affairs Institute, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University
2006-continuing: Member, Steering Committee, Campbell Public Affairs Institute, Maxwell School, Syracuse University
2006-continuing: History Department Representative, Humanities Council, Syracuse University
2005-continuing: Member, Academic Freedom, Tenure, and Professional Ethics Committee, Syracuse University, including confidential subcommittee service
2005-continuing: Senator (elected), University Senate, Syracuse University
2005-continuing: Member, College of Arts and Sciences Curriculum Committee, Syracuse University
1996-continuing: Manuscript Reader—Cambridge University Press, University of Illinois Press, Harvard University Press, University of North Carolina Press, Cornell University Press, Journal of American History, Oxford University Press, University of Illinois Press, Journal of Religious History; Specialist Reader, Berkshire Conference Annual Book Prize Committee, and others
1994-continuing: Director, American Studies Program, Syracuse University
2003-2006: Peer Reviewer, American Council of Learned Societies Annual Fellowship Competition for 2004-5 and again for 2005-6
2005: Chair, Roger Kittleson Committee, Fall 2005, Dept. of History, Syracuse
University
2005-6: Member, Annual Review Committee for Samantha Herrick, Dept. of History, Syracuse University
2004-5: Chair, Modern European History Search Committee, Department of History, Syracuse University
2000-2005: Organizer, Lecture Series on the State of Democracy, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University
1999-2004: Chair, Annual Review Committee for Andrew Cohen, Department of
History, Syracuse University
1999-2002: Graduate Committee, Member, Department of History, Syracuse University
2000-2001: Member, Ancient Historian Search Committee, Department of History, Syracuse University
2000-2001: Participant, Dean’s Faculty Luncheon Forums, Maxwell School, Syracuse University
1998-2000: Executive Committee, Founding Member, Historical Society
1999-2000: Member of Committee for the Lecture Series on the State of Democracy, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University
1997-98: Chair, American Social Thought Search Committee, Department of History, Syracuse University
1995-98: Executive Committee, Member, Department of History (by election)
1995-97: University Senator (by election), Syracuse University
1995-97: Graduate Committee, Member, Department of History, Syracuse University
1994-95: Academic Committee, Chair, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University
1994-95: African American Historian Hiring Committee, Member, Department of History, Syracuse University
1994-95: First-Year Student Advisor, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University
1994-95: Syracuse University Pilot Program for the Peer Review of Teaching, Department of History Representative, American Association of Higher Education, Syracuse University
1990-95: Phi Alpha Theta, Syracuse’s Faculty Advisor (History Honor Society)
1991-93: Academic Committee, Member, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University
1992-93: S.U. Scholars Subcommittee, Chair, Arts and Sciences Academic Committee, Syracuse University
1991-92: S.U. Scholars Subcommittee, Member, Arts and Sciences Academic Committee, Syracuse University
1991-92: First-Year Student Advisor, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University
1990-91: Asian Historian Hiring Committee, Department of History, Syracuse University 

Recent Invited Lectures

“Philip Rieff,” Roundtable on “Philip Rieff: Charisma and Grace,” The Tocqueville Forum on the Roots of American Democracy, Georgetown University, April 20, 2007. Invited paper.
Comment on paper on Romer v. Evans by Jeff Carnes, Syracuse University College of Law’s Cooney Colloquium on Law and the Humanities, Goldstein Faculty Center, Syracuse University, October 17, 2006, 6 p.m.
“Unethical Edicts: Contemporary American Culture’s Threat to Democracy” in “The Meaning of Democracy” lecture series, Syracuse University’s University College, Christian Brothers Academy, Dewitt, NY, October 11, 2006, 7 p.m. Invited public lecture.
Interview on my introduction to Philip Rieff’s Triumph of the Therapeutic (above), Thursday, September 7, 2006, 10 a.m. prerecorded at WAER (Syracuse radio station) for audio journal publication, Mars Hill Audio, Charlottesville, Virginia, vol. 82 (September/October 2006). Reference: MHT-82.1.2.
“The Morals of Despair: Diversity, Therapeutic Disenchantment, and the Public Philosophy,” Center for American Political Studies, Program on Constitutional Government, Department of Government, Harvard University, April 14, 2006. Invited paper.
Seminar Participation, “Liberty and Responsibility in the Odyssey,” Liberty Fund, Miami, Florida, Dec. 8-11, 2005. Invited participation.
Interview on “A Stranger’s Dream” (above), Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2005, 11 a.m. prerecorded at WAER (Syracuse radio station) for audio journal publication, Mars Hill Audio, Charlottesville, Virginia, vol. 78 (January/February 2006). Reference: MHT-78.1.2.
Roundtable Forum Participant, American Institute for Managing Diversity, 20th Anniversary Celebration, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2005, Atlanta, Georgia. Videotaped by WTLN, Inc. (Teaching/Learning Network) for broadcast on public television nationally, “Voices of Vision.” Invited address.
Two panel presentations: “Is Morality Making a Comeback?” and “Social Capital Versus Multiculturalism” at the Battle of Ideas, Institute of Ideas, Royal College of Art, London, England, October 29-30, 2005. Invited papers.
Radio Interview, BBC Radio 4: “Thinking Allowed,” (took place in London, England), October 24, 2005.
Radio Interview, BBC Radio 4: Radio Documentary on “The Business of Race,” (took place in London, England) Oct. 23 for Dec. 12, 2005 broadcast.
Consultation and research response to the film “Crash,” via interviews with senior associate producer, Oprah Winfrey Show, summer 2005.
“Beyond Ritual and Prejudgment: Democratic Self-Discipline as a New Basis for Civility in a Pluralistic Age,” Conference on “Diversity as a Competitive Advantage,” Whitman School of Management and Academy of Management, Minnowbrook Conference Center, Blue Lake, Adirondacks, NY, June 9-11, 2005.
Comment, Panel on public history, Conference on New York State History, SUNY ESF, Syracuse New York, June 9, 2005.
Moderator and Host, Lecture Series on the State of Democracy, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, three to five events per year with visiting speaker and in-house respondents, since fall 2000, this year to include E.J. Dionne on November 30, 2004 and Michael Walzer, April 1, 2005.
Invited Lecture on Race Experts, West Chester University, October 22, 2002.
Radio Interviews on Race Experts:
*KLIF Dallas-Fort Worth, TX, April 24, 2002, 9:00 a.m.-9:30 a.m. (live)
*WAMC, Albany, NY, Roundtable with Susan Arbetter, October 16, 2001, 1:00-1:30 p.m. (taped)
*Wisconsin Public Radio, Conversations with Jean Feraca, October 23, 2001, 10:00-11:00 a.m.(live)
*Powernomics Radio, Washington, D.C., Tom Pope Show, November 5, 2001, 12:00-1:00 p.m. (live)
*Paula Gordon Show, Atlanta, GA (hosts traveled to Syracuse to record in-person interview), November 5, 2001, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Invited Book Seminar on Race Experts, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, April 10, 2002, 3:00-5:00 p.m.
Panelist, Invited Conference and Ongoing Work Group on “The Human Person,” Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Funded by the Pew Foundation, April 4-7, 2001, and April 10-11, 2002, and June 18-21, 2003. Paper to be published in a volume by Cambridge University Press.
Commentator, “Re-Thinking Anti-Racism in Postwar America,” Annual Meeting of the Organization of American Historians, April 12, 2002.
“How Racial Etiquette, Sensitivity Training, and New Age Therapy Hijacked the Civil Rights Revolution,” Invited Lecture in Core Connections Speakers Series, University of New England Biddeford Campus, February 22, 2002, noon lecture/discussion.
“Therapy, Manipulation, and the Mind of the Modern American,” Invited Lecture, New England Institute, University of New England Portland (Westbrook) Campus, February 22, 2002, evening address.
Interview by London-based journalist, Brendan O’Neill, for online periodical spiked-online.com; “Giving Race Experts a Lasching,” February 7, 2002, available at http://www.spiked-online.com/Articles/00000002D400.htm.
Panelist, Invited Conference on the Therapeutic Society, Boston University, March 31-April 1, 2001. Organizer: Jonathan Imber. Paper published in journal Society and book Therapeutic Culture (above).
Invited Participant, Working Group on Life/Work Balance, Convened by Professor Robert Putnam, Harvard University, December 16-17, 2000. (Declined--schedule conflict.)
“The Civic Sense: The Maxwell Vision and the Imperatives of Democratic Intellectual Life,” Luncheon Keynote Address, Maxwell Advisory Board, Syracuse University, September 22, 2000.
Radio Interview, “Women’s Voices” Program on Women and Philanthropy, WAER (Jazz 88), September 21, 2000.
Panelist, Roundtable: “Richard Rorty’s Achieving Our Country,” Organization of American Historians, Annual Meeting, St. Louis, March 31, 2000.
“Questioning What Constitutes Social Progress at the End of the Twentieth Century,” Public Address, Faculty Milestones Millenium Women Lecture Series, Hendricks Chapel, Syracuse University, February 23, 2000.
Panelist, Conference on Orlando Patterson’s Rituals of Blood, organized by Salmagundi magazine (transcript later published in special winter/spring 2002 issue), Skidmore College, Feb. 4-6, 2000.
“Do Valuing Diversity Training Programs Really Work?” on “Straight to the Source,” Television Appearance, Onondaga County Commission on Human Rights, Time Warner Cable (Channel 13), December 9, 1999.
“The Experience of Racial Integration: American Social Life in the Aftermath of the Civil Rights Movement,” Public Address in Critical Events of the 20th Century lecture series, Syracuse University Humanistic Studies Center, October 27, 1999.
“Beyond Racial Diversity,” Paper, Maxwell School Symposium on Civic Engagement, Syracuse University, October 23, 1999.
"Racial Matters, Racial Manners," Radio Interview on "Dialogue" Show, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Public Radio International, Broadcast September 27-October 3, 1999.
“Beyond Racial Diversity,” Work-In-Progress Presentation Maxwell Symposium on Civic Engagement, April 23, 1999, pilot symposium for October 1999 conference at Maxwell School, Syracuse University.
Presentation on editing work for Women and the Common Life (1997), Graduate Seminar of Professor William McClay, Georgetown University, April 20, 1999.
“Prescriptions for Interracial Conduct Since the 1960s,” Paper, Washington Seminar on American History and Culture, George Washington University, April 14, 1999.
“Race and Etiquette Since the 1960s.” Public Address, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, March 16, 1999.
Participant, Symposium on Tradition and Liberty, Annapolis, MD, Liberty Fund, December 8-10, 1998.
“Interracial Etiquette.” Keynote Address. Phi Alpha Theta Regional Conference, Syracuse April 25, 1998.
Commentator, Panel on the Professionalization of Religious Work, Women and Twentieth-Century Protestantism Conference, Chicago, April 24, 1998.
Radio Interview with Geraldine Doogue on “Life Matters,” Australian Radio National, Summer 1997.
“The Meaning of Work.” Commencement Address. Alverno College, Milwaukee, WI, May 1997.
“Race and Etiquette.” Invited Lecture, Department of History, Binghamton University, April 30, 1997.
“How to Behave Sensitively: Prescriptions for Interracial Conduct, 1960s-1990s.” Invited Lecture, Maryville College, St. Louis, February 19, 1997.
“Women in Academia: Miscellaneous Reflections.” Invited Lecture, Conference on Women and Work, State University of New York at Morrisville, March 7, 1997.
Commentator, Session on Women, Race, and Reform. Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, June 7-9, 1996.
“Radical Chic and the Rise of a Therapeutics of Race,” Invited Lecture, Department of History, SUNY Morrisville, March 6, 1996.
Chair and Commentator, Session on African American Social Workers, National Conference of The Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Philadelphia, October 6, 1995.
“New Thoughts on Black Neighbors,” Invited Lecture and Discussion, Phi Alpha Theta, Department of History, LeMoyne College, March 29, 1995.
“Women’s Work: The Social Basis of Civic Mindedness in the American Settlement House Movement,” Keynote Address for the Conference on Celebrating Women in the Social Sciences, Syracuse University, March 22, 1995.
“The Ritual of Exclusion in the American Civil Rights Movement,” Invited Lecture, American Studies Program, Boston University, April 1994.
“The Ritual of Exclusion in the American Civil Rights Movement,” Invited Lecture, Fellows of the Whitney Humanities Center, Yale University, April 1994 (earlier version of the above).
“Communitarianism, Civil Rights, and the Welfare State,” Social Science History Association’s Annual Meeting, Baltimore, November 1993.
Commentator and Chair of separate sessions, New York State Historical Association Meeting, Seneca Falls, NY, June 1993.
Chair, Session of Conference on Women and Peace, Program for the Analysis and Resolution of Conflicts, Syracuse University, May 1993.
Presenter of Workshop on Oral History of African Americans in Syracuse, Onondaga Historical Association, February 1993.
Consultant for Exhibit on Children and the Erie Canal in the Nineteenth Century, Erie Canal Museum, Syracuse, New York, Winter 1993.
“Variations on a Theme: Settlement Work Among Black Americans,” American Historical Association’s Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, December 27-30, 1992.
Commentator, Panel on History of Women’s Community Organizing, Upstate New York Women’s History Organization Fall Meeting, Syracuse University, November 14, 1992.
“Black Neighbors: Race and the Limits of Reform in the American Settlement House Movement, 1890-1945,” Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, September 1990.
“Female Vanguard in Race Relations: ‘Mother Power’ and Blacks in the American Settlement House Movement, 1900-1945” Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, Rutgers University, June 7-10, 1990.
“Race and the Limits of Reform in the American Settlement House Movement,” Dissertation Lecture Series, Department of History, University of Massachusetts, Spring 1990.
“Twilight of the Politics of Metaphor: The Search for a Black Identity in the 1960s” American Studies Spring Symposium at Purdue University, March 24-26, 1988.
“Settlement Workers and Blacks in the Progressive Era: Mary White Ovington and the Limits of Social Reform,” Convention on New York History, New York Historical Association, June 5-6, 1987.
“Inducting the Insane into the Social Order: The Vermont Asylum for the Insane, 1836-1890,”M.A. Thesis.
“The Reformers and the Reformed in the Work of Michel Foucault” led to participation in University of Vermont Faculty Seminar with visiting participant, Michel Foucault, 1983.  

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