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Maxwell School

MPA Program

PAIA Course List

For full degree program information, see the MPA Handbook.

Most PAIA-based courses are also described below. (Note also that not every course listed below is offered every year.  Check the MPA Fall 2013 Schedule.)

PAI 600  

PUBLIC AFFAIRS COLLOQUIUM
This course has three objectives: (1) to orient incoming students to the MPA program, the Maxwell School and Syracuse University; (2) to give students a sense of the scope and nature of skills and attributes required of public administrators; and (3) to provide students with practice in the art of policy analysis and teamwork through written and oral presentations and interactive workshops. The colloquium draws on Maxwell faculty, alumni, and other scholars and practitioners.

Prerequisites Open to MPA students only.

Requirements Participation in all sessions; working groups with oral presentations.

PAI 712

PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS & MANAGEMENT
This course introduces students to the study of organizations and management. The objectives of this course are three-fold. First, students will learn various theories and concepts to develop their capacities for understanding organizational phenomena. They will apply these frameworks to "real world" problems through simulations and case analyses. Second, students will apply analytical methods to a semester-long organizational study that provides an in-depth case for learning first hand about organizations, diagnosing problems, and prescribing concrete solutions. Finally, this course focuses on the impact of organizations on persons who work within them by stressing the significance of key management competencies. Specifically, we will discuss human motivation, communication, conflict, and decision making.

PAI 721

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
Students are introduced to a variety of tools and techniques for analyzing data. Basic topics in descriptive statistics, probability theory and statistical inference are covered. Specific topics include; descriptive analysis of data; analysis of comparisons and associations; probability theory; sampling; point and interval estimation; and hypothesis testing. Lectures and assignments will be supported by the use of a statistical computer package.

PAI 722

QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS
The course is designed to provide conceptual and methodological tools for managers, evaluators and analysts charged with formally evaluating program implementation and performance. The goal is to equip students with the skills required to develop and conduct program evaluation research projects, and to be an intelligent consumer of program evaluation research conducted by others.

Prerequisite PAI 721 Introduction to Statistics, or its equivalent. Knowledge of basic economic concepts is assumed.  

PAI 723

ECONOMICS FOR PUBLIC DECISIONS This course deals with the application of microeconomic analysis to public policy problems. Course is designed for students with a limited background in economics. The principal goal of the course is to teach students how to use basic economic reasoning to help untangle complex policy problems. Lectures and problem sets on microeconomic tools are combined with discussions and written assignments that apply these tools to public policy. The topics covered include supply and demand, household and firm behavior, market equilibrium, pollution and congestion, and benefit‑cost analysis.

Requirements Problem sets; short written assignments; mid‑term and final exams. 

PAI 734

PUBLIC BUDGETING Fundamental concepts and practices of budgeting, financial management, and tax analysis are introduced. The budget process, budget preparation, cost analysis, and budget reform are covered in detail. An overview is provided of basic financial management functions, such as cash management, debt management, and government accounting. Students are provided the fundamentals of tax evaluation for the property tax, sales taxes, and personal income tax.

Requirements Mid-term and final exams; spreadsheet analysis of budget; other assignments based on case materials.

PAI 752

MPA WORKSHOP
All MPA students participate in an intensive, four-week, full-time workshop that addresses current topics in public management. Project assignments covering a broad array of topics are done in teams of 5-8 students. Students have an opportunity to express choice of topics prior to the start of the workshops, but the department will make final assignments. The objective of each workshop is application in the "real world" of the subject matter and techniques acquired in previous MPA course work in research, analysis and report preparation. The course will be offered in May immediately following the spring semester, and is an intensive, required, capstone course to the MPA degree. Students should note that a full-time commitment is required and outside work requirements are NOT recommended.

Prerequisite Completion of the majority of MPA course work, or permission of Workshop faculty. Available to MPA students only. Due to the team nature of this course, students are not allowed to drop this course once teams are assembled.

Requirements Full-time commitment required. 

PAI 753

EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP SEMINAR
Executive Leadership is about YOU. It is your time to reflect on and process your year at Maxwell.
It is about cultivating your own leadership style (and followership style when appropriate). It is about transitioning from student to professional. Topics covered include: Interest-based negotiation as leadership, work and conflict self assessment, negotiation in groups, managerial mediation as leadership, working with the media, ethical leadership, persuasion and advocacy as leadership, collaborative problem solving as leadership, negotiating in networks, entrepreneurship and creativity as leadership, and leadership styles and assessments.
The course will be offered in June immediately following the MPA Workshop, and is an intensive, required, course to the MPA degree. Students should note that a full-time commitment is required and outside work requirements are NOT recommended.

Prerequisite: Available to MPA students only. Completion of the majority of MPA course work or permission of department .

Requirements: Full-time commitment required. 

PAI 755

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION & DEMOCRACY
This course emphasizes signature Maxwell School values and perspectives: public service, governance, and citizenship. It will explore the critical role of politics and the political environment in effective public management. It will acquaint the student with other significant issues as well: the constitutional foundation of American government; the evolving international order and the vital need for international awareness and understanding; and the role of bureaucratic expertise and power in contemporary government. Readings, discussions and exercises in the seminar are designed to illuminate the tensions inherent in modern government and to examine the role -- real or potential -- for public organizations and managers in addressing and solving public problems.

Core MA IR Courses 

 

PAI 723

ECONOMICS CORE (select one):

ECONOMICS FOR PUBLIC DECISIONS
This course deals with the application of microeconomic analysis to public policy problems. Course is designed for students with a limited background in economics. The principal goal of the course is to teach students how to use basic economic reasoning to help untangle complex policy problems. Lectures and problem sets on microeconomic tools are combined with discussions and written assignments that apply these tools to public policy. The topics covered include supply and demand, household and firm behavior, market equilibrium, pollution and congestion, and benefit‑cost analysis.

Requirements Problem sets; short written assignments; mid‑term and final exams. 

ECN601

SURVEY OF MICROECONOMIC THEORY
This is a basic microeconomic theory survey course taught at the graduate level. It does not presume extensive prior background with the material.

 

 PAI 704

STATISTICS CORE (select one):  

QUANTITATIVE SKILLS IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
The course covers the diverse sources and methods used to collect data upon which decisions are made.  It is aimed to help train IR professionals in tools needed to better develop and implement progams and policies. 

PAI 721

INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS
Students are introduced to a variety of tools and techniques for analyzing data. Basic topics in descriptive statistics, probability theory and statistical inference are covered. Specific topics include; descriptive analysis of data; analysis of comparisons and associations; probability theory; sampling; point and interval estimation; and hypothesis testing. Lectures and assignments will be supported by the use of a statistical computer package. 

 

PAI 700

EVALUATION CORE (select one):

RESEARCH DESIGN FOR IR PRACTITIONERS
The course will provide an overview of how social science research is conducted and how it can be used in policy-making in international affairs.  It is based on the assumption that good policy-making and program design should be evidence-based, and that those designing, implementing, and evaluating these policies should have a grounding in how social scientific research is conducted, and what separates good research from bad research, to ensure that students can be intelligent consumers of research on international affairs.

PAI 705

STRATEGIC PLANNING, IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
The focus of this course is on strategic planning, project implementation and methods of evaluation used in the field of international affairs.  It provides an overview of qualitative techniques ranging from participant observation to elite interviewing and program evaluation and analysis. 



PAI 707

 IR SIGNATURE COURSE (select one):

CULTURE AND WORLD AFFAIRS
This course provides a systematic survey of the ways in which local, organization, and transnational issues in world affairs are affected by culture.

PAI 716

ECONOMIC DIMENSTIONS OF GLOBAL POWER
This class explores the ways in which growing economic interdependence shifts in the locus of global wealth; and ongoing technological change affect the ability of state and non-state actors to exert influence.  Prerequisite is ECN 601 or PAI 723. 

PSC 783

COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY
A survey and critique of approaches to understanding foreign policy decision-making from the perspective of the practitioner who must deal with problems of individual choice, small groups, bureaucratic politics, and organizational constraints in the conduct of foreign policy. Case studies and simulations are used to provide first-hand experience in policy decision-making in the United States and other countries.

The course begins with an overview and critique of competing world views, such as realism and neo-realism, pluralism, globalism, feminism, and post-modern perspectives. After exploring these world views, we focus on the challenges of decision-making. In addition, students have the opportunity to participate in policy research projects and report their findings to "clients" in other countries. 

PAIA Elective Courses

PAI 600

STABILIZATION AND GROWTH IN EMERGING MARKETS
This course offers a rigorous theoretical an applied study of macroeconomics of emerging market countries.  It is designed to complement other SU courses which tend to adopt a decidely microeconomic emphasis in the study of such countries.  The course targets students who have taken PAI 716 Economic Dimensions of Global Power, ECN 602 or for students who have sought permission of instructor to enroll in the absence of these courses. 

PAI 600

INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS AND FINANCE
Monetary, fiscal, and regulatory consequences of mushrooming international financial markets including equities, bonds and other securities, commodity and options contracts, and bank deposits and loans.  PAI 716 or ECN 602 prerequisite and permission of instructor required.

PAI 601

FUNDAMENTALS OF CONFLICT STUDIES
The goals of this class are to provide students with a broad overview of the interdisciplinary field of conflict analysis and resolution, to introduce them to faculty and the work they are doing in this field, and to help them to develop a framework for diagnosing and responding to conflicts within their own area of interest. Over the course of the semester we will explore the diverse range of (sometimes contradictory) theories of social conflict found across the social science disciplines. Of particular interest throughout the course will be uncovering how our theories about the nature of social conflicts result in our making particular choices about which conflict resolution activities make sense under which conditions. Relying on a number of guest speakers, documentaries, and group projects, we will consider how conflict manifests across multiple levels of analysis (from inter-group to international) as well as within specific topical areas (ethnic/racial, environmental, foreign policy etc.).

PAI 670

EXPERIENCE CREDIT
Prerequisite: Proposal required.

PAI 684

IR OF THE MIDDLE EAST
This course's objective is to introduce the central issues of contemporary Middle Eastern politics within the larger framework of international relations theory. The course will offer and evaluate theories that attempt to explain regional conflict and political change. In the process, students will develop a deeper appreciation of the internal and external factors that have created the Middle East state system that so confounds the world today. The course will specifically emphasize the historical and contemporary interaction between the Middle East and the United States. 

PAI 690

INDEPENDENT STUDY
Prerequisite: Proposal required.

PAI 700 

TERRORISM IN THE 21ST CENTURY
The attacks on New York and Washington on September 11, 2001 began an international campaign to combat the phenomena of transnational terrorism. The campaign against trans-national terrorism has changed the way nation-states and international and regional organizations interact and combat the new threat. The aim of the course is to provide the students with an introduction of how states, IGOs, and regional organizations function within the challenge that the 'new' brand of terrorism poses to the world.  

PAI 700

CRISIS MANAGEMENT
This course examines leadership, cooperation, and conflict in times of crisis. An emphasis is placed on understanding the key dynamics that influence the way that decision makers perceive and respond to crises and the kinds of processes that facilitate constructive crisis management. Real life case illustrations, exercises, and simulations are used to give participants an interactive experience and a realistic understanding of the limitations and opportunities that arise in high-pressure crisis management situations. The course familiarizes students with contrasting points of view on crisis management from across disciplinary boundaries; in particular, international relations, public administration, and public communication.  Students write a case study on a crisis of their choosing that follows a pre-set research methodology developed at the Maxwell School.  

PAI 707

CULTURE AND WORLD AFFAIRS
This course provides a systematic survey of the ways in which local, organization, and transnational issues in world affairs are affected by culture. Also serves as a signature course option for MA IR degree.

PAI 713

GOVERNANCE AND GLOBAL CIVIL SOCIETY
This course provides a survey of perspectives and literatures on global civil society organizations and transnational NGOs.  Students will integrate these literatures through critical analysis.   

PAI 715

GLOBALIZATION AND DEVELOPMENT COURSES (IN DC)
These courses will meet in Washington, DC at the Greenberg House, evenings, throughout the fall semester. The courses include: Post-Conflict Reconstruction; Strengthening Inter-agency Negotiations; Global Trade and Developing Markets; NGO Leadership; and Global Development Policy. These courses are targeted toward joint MPA/MA in International Relations students who will be in residence for two years and participating in a Fall internship in Washington, DC. Traditional PA graduate students may not be able to take advantage of a fall semester away from campus if core courses are required in that term.

PAI 716

ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS OF GLOBAL POWER
This class explores the ways in which growing economic interdependence shifts in the locus of global wealth; and ongoing technological change affect the ability of state and non-state actors to exert influence.  Also serves as a signature course option for the MA IR degree.  

PAI 717

INTERNATIONAL SECURITY This course will familiarize students with some of the major theoretical approaches to the study of international security, and some of the central issues shaping current debates about security and the use of force.  War and conflict have been central to international politics.  The study of security investigates causes of war, strategies for avoiding conflict, and the impact of new technologies, actors, and ideas on calculations about the use of force.  The goal is to give students a solid grounding in current research and theoretical approaches to the study of international security, and to encourage them to think about how this knowledge applies to ongoing security problems.

PAI 718

US NATIONAL SECURITY AND FOREIGN POLICY
This course will explore U.S. national security and foreign policy. We will examine U.S. policy during the cold war to establish a framework for understanding the policy challenges the U.S. faces today; current policy issues; and foreign and security policy decision-making. The course will use a combination of readings, case studies, exercises, and guest speakers to explore issues ranging from the U.S. national security structure, diplomacy and the use of force, U.S. relations with allies and potential adversaries, and the role of human rights and morality in U.S. policy.

PAI 719 

FUNDAMENTALS OF POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION 
(satisfies a core requirement for the Certificate of Advanced Study in Post-Conflict Reconstruction)
The goal of this class is to familiarize students with the broad literature on post conflict reconstruction, the various dimensions and goals of post-conflict work, the types of actors that conduct it, the trade-offs and dilemmas they face, and the lessons learned from its application across various settings. The course will devote considerable attention to the applied side of post-conflict reconstruction; that is, the techniques and tools used by international intermediaries (states, IOs and NGOs) as well as local stakeholders to transition societies from violence to sustainable peace. It will also address many of the key issues that frame the debate in post-conflict reconstruction work: the tension between externally and internally generated recovery efforts; the possibilities and weaknesses of formal peace and reconciliation commissions; the challenges of civilian-military cooperation in post-conflict zones; the trade-offs between stability and liberty; and the quest for viable exit strategies for international actors.

PAI 730

THE US FEDERAL BUDGET: BUDGET AND ENTITLEMENT PROGRAM REFORM Most people who seriously consider U.S. fiscal policy think that the long-term picture for the federal budget looks very bleak, and that substantial alterations in current tax and spending policies will be necessary to prevent deficits and debt from growing to unsustainable levels.  Numerous factors comprise this picture, but central among them is the projected rapid growth in spending for the three largest entitlement programs (Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid) due to population aging and the inexorable rise in per capita health care costs.  This course begins with a broad introduction to the budget and related Congressional decision-making processes and the major challenges posed by both for federal policymakers over the next decade.  It next explores in-depth the issues surrounding the reform of Social Security, then turns to consideration of the U.S. health care system and its reform, with particular attention to Medicare and Medicaid, before finally returning to the broad picture and prospects for our fiscal future. 

This course is particularly appropriate for U.S. students interested in budget or social policy at the national level.  Basic understanding of economics and the American political and institutional environment is essential.  Enrollment is limited to 15, so that classes can be conducted in seminar format with considerable discussion.  Requirements include active participation in class discussion, written comments on readings, four short ‘briefing memos’, and participation in a group project on reform issues/options related to one of the three major topics of the course.

PAI 730

CHILD AND FAMILY POLICY 
This course applies microeconomic theory to the study of the family and is composed of three parts.  The first covers the microeconomic tools and perspectives that will be utilized throughout the course.  The second focuses on the theoretical models developed to inform our understanding of the family.  A variety of topics will be covered including marriage and divorce, fertility, employment, and human capital.  The final section will be devoted to the application of this theory in the policy arena.  Subject matter in the application section will consist of, but is not limited to, policies targeting poverty, retirement, and child support.  Domestic policies are the primary source for examples.  Throughout the course, children and their outcomes are of particular concern.

PAI 730

HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT 
This class investigates the relationship between economic change and health status at global, regional, and national levels. After explication of the major social scientific theories of health development in terms of epidemiological patterns and historical philosophies of intervention, the course considers a set of case studies from politically and economically disparate contexts. Taking a contextualized, population-level perspective across these cases of health development intervention, the course argues that health policy, economic policy, and political action are inextricable from one another – that improving global health requires the redress of global political and economic inequalities, and vice versa.

PAI 730

FORECASTING FOR POLICY ANALYSIS AND PUBLIC MANAGEMENT All policy and management decisions require some type of forecast. A decision to do something in the future assumes a prediction of how that action will work out.  This course covers technical approaches to forecasting including time series methods, organizational processes for managing the forecasting process, and political influences on forecasting.  Emphasis is on the role of forecasts as information used in policy analysis and managerial decision-making, along with the process of evaluating forecasts and forecasting processes.

PRE-REQUISITE: PAI 721: Introduction to Statistics or its equivalent. Knowledge of basic economics concepts is assumed.  The computer will be utilized, but no prior programming experience is necessary.

PAI 730

TAX POLICY AND POLITICS 
Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes said, “Taxes are what we pay for civilized society.” The price of civilized society depends not only on the amount of revenue raised, but on the way it is done.  How progressive should the tax system be?  Should the tax system reward good behavior and punish bad?  Should it provide subsidies to achieve social objectives, such as decent childcare, affordable housing, or access to health care?  How should married couples and families be taxed?  Should death be a taxable event?  Should we tax the amount people earn or the amount people spend?  How much complexity can people tolerate in furtherance of social or other tax policy objectives?  How should the tax burden be distributed among generations?  The objectives of this course are:  (1) to understand how the tax system got the way it is today; (2) to understand the major tax policy issues that drive the current political debate; and, (3) to understand the implications of alternative tax policy choices for the future.

PAI 730

COLLABORATIVE AND PARTICIPATORY GOVERNANCE 
This course explores the theory and practice of collaborative and participatory governance in public administration and policy making. Students will learn about: 1) the major concepts, theories, and debates regarding collaboration and participation; 2) examples of collaboration and participation in various policy domains and at all levels of government around the world; and 3) the analytical tools and practical skills needed to engage in collaborative and participatory governance. At the end of the course, students should be better equipped to understand where, when, why and how to use collaborative and participatory governance strategies in the practical world of public administration and policy.

PAI 730

MANAGING INDIVIDUAL/GROUP/SYSTEMIC CONFLICT 
This course will introduce the “suite of skills” embedded in the collaborative manager’s capacity to pre-empt, prevent and manage conflict at the individual, group and system levels in a manner consistent with least cost, highest involvement, and greatest satisfaction with results.  Deep understanding of the spectrum of options for addressing conflict will be achieved, focusing on acquiring the voluntary dispute resolution skills of interest-based negotiation and problem solving; mediation of disputes; facilitation of group development and performance; high engagement meeting design and implementation; and dispute systems design to introduce more opportunities for the systematic use of these voluntary dispute resolution processes within organizations and systems.  The course will offer the theoretical foundation for the “evolution of voluntary resolution” and will focus on handing off the skills to class participants through highly interactive practicums.  Successful accomplishment of this course will be a necessary requirement for consideration as a PARCC “intern” when facilitation opportunities arise within the local client community.

PAI 730

PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS  

 

PAI 730

LABOR RELATIONS IN THE PUBLIC SECTOR 
This course will introduce participants to the U.S. public employment sector through the lens of relationships between individual workers, groups of workers and their unions and associations, and employers and their organizations – all interacting within a political environment with great public visibility and accountability.  The degree of union representation in U.S. state, local and federal employment is approximately 37% across the country (compared to approximately 7% in the private employment sector), with the federal system nearly 80% organized of those eligible to be represented by unions.  For those planning a career in the U.S. public sector, knowledge of how to manage effectively in a union environment will likely be invaluable.  The course will cover the legal, structural, and practice frameworks for the organized employment relationship, offering process choices for conflict mitigation, employee engagement, performance improvement, and mission accomplishment.

PAI 730

i-governance MANAGEMENT IN THE INFORMATION AGEThis course is designed for non-IT professionals and public managers who want to be prepared for future technology challenges. The course focuses on the emerging topics and problems public managers are facing in the networked world. The Internet has created opportunities and possibilities for more direct participation of all stakeholders, such as citizens, media, businesses and non-profit organizations. At the same time it poses threats and challenges such as information overload, privacy and security concerns, etc. Effective public managers now have the challenging task to provide public data in meaningful ways in times of shrinking budgets and more complex mandates. The topics covered in this class include governance concepts, technology and infrastructure, mobile government, enabling i-governance, open source, knowledge management and communities of practice, global solutions and an outlook into emerging technology trends of the social web. How can we enable information-enabled government, the use of new technologies, and track the performance of these tools? This course can be combined with the sequel “Information Management in the Public Sector II: Government 2.0” during the spring semester.

PAI 730

GOVERNMENT 2.0 This course provides an overview of the contemporary practices for managing the information assets of public sector organizations.   The course highlights the challenges of managing the information assets of government organizations in a networked economy, practical applications for building the information capabilities of organizations, and understanding the information infrastructure. The special focus of this course are current topics such as Web 2.0 applications in public sector organizations. Students will examine through active learning exercises how management, technology and organizational components work together to create information systems in order to understand the behavioral aspects of IT usage in government.  The course is mainly focused on IT management aspects and makes therefore no assumptions about the student’s prior experience with computer hardware, software, and telecommunications.

PAI 730

SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE 2012 ELECTION
The class will track social media use in the 2012 presidential campaigns, while also ensuring that public administration and international relations students become proficient in using social media. Each week, students will discuss real-time social media events from the campaign trail.  The class will feature guest speakers from both parties' campaign teams, as well as from within government. Mergel will bring in speakers who used social media on previous campaigns and have since transitioned into government positions to use social media for ongoing governance issues.  Fall 2012 only!  

PAI 730

PUBLIC POLICY MAKING: THE FEDERAL PERSPECTIVE (IN DC)
Examines public policy development in the executive and legislative branches with attention to the intersection of private and public interests.  Areas for examination will include: the savings and loan legislation; public changes in financial institution policy; energy policy; national health care policy, etc.  Focus will be on the applied, practical considerations facing policymakers and public administrators.  This course is taught in Washington, DC at Syracuse University’s Greenberg House and will include several guest speakers from the various branches of government, experts on several issues of public interest and representatives of media and its role in shaping public policy.

PAI 730

ENVIRONMENTAL CONFLICT RESOLUTION & COLLABORATION

Using a series of case study modules that jump off the front page, the course examines critically the hardest U.S. national security law and policy challenges of the decades ahead. The case studies range from decisions to intervene and what laws apply if we do intervene  in humanitarian crises, insurrections, or civil wars, and what laws should govern when we are involved; dealing with the Arab Spring; dealing with Iran and North Korea related to nuclear weapons; anticipating and controlling new technologies in warfare and surveillance; managing civil/military relations in protecting the homeland; countering the cyber threats to our infrastructure and cyber-attacks waged by nation states, such as China and Russia; managing public health as a national security issue; resource depletion and global warming as a national security issue.

PAI 730

CLIMATE CHANGE: SCIENCE, PERCEPTION AND POLICY 
Climate change will be one of the most pressing problems of the twenty-first century. This course introduces students to the challenges posed by climate change through a unique multi-disciplinary exploration of the scientific, economic, policy, communicative, and even philosophical dimensions of the issue. The course will cover topics such as the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, the role of the media in shaping public opinion on the issue, competing discourses of climate change, risk and uncertainty in decision-making, costs and benefits of different types of policies, the Kyoto protocol and other policy initiatives, actions being taken to address the issue, and the ethical dimensions of the choices facing humanity.  Faculty from SU and ESF in law, economics/public administration, earth science, and environmental studies co-teach the course and bring to students a unique dialog that crosses traditional disciplinary boundaries. Moreover, emphasis is placed on drawing out the general lessons obtained from a multi-disciplinary approach to climate change: many of the insights are applicable to other complex, highly technical environmental problems. This course is intended to bring together students from a diverse range of backgrounds and does not have specific prerequisites.

 PAI 764

UN ORGANIZATIONS: MANAGING FOR CHANGE
This course analyzes the processes for change in UN organizations. It begins with brief summaries of types of UN organizations, including their purposes, funding systems and governance structures. Half of the course will focus on the process of change in UN organizations funded by assessed contributions, highlighting the UN secretariat. The other half of the course will highlight the World Food Program as an example of the process of change in a voluntarily funded agency. Students will be graded on class participation, memos, a final paper, and occasional unannounced in class assignments.

PAI 730

CENTRAL CHALLENGES TO NATIONAL SECURITY LAW & POLICY
Using a series of case study modules that jump off the front page, the course examines critically the hardest U.S. national security law and policy challenges of the decades ahead. The case studies range from decisions to intervene and what laws apply if we do intervene  in humanitarian crises, insurrections, or civil wars, and what laws should govern when we are involved; dealing with the Arab Spring; dealing with Iran and North Korea related to nuclear weapons; anticipating and controlling new technologies in warfare and surveillance; managing civil/military relations in protecting the homeland; countering the cyber threats to our infrastructure and cyber-attacks waged by nation states, such as China and Russia; managing public health as a national security issue; resource depletion and global warming as a national security issue.  

PAI 730

US INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY:  GOVERNANCE & PRACTICE, 1947-PRESENT
The range of activities by all elements of the Intelligence Community from postwar origins through the Cold War; intelligence operations, governance and assessment, reform and growth since 2001.  This course will examine the evolution of the U.S. Intelligence Community (I.C.) since its inception in 1947 through the present day.  Key phases and specific events will be explored, including I.C. efforts throughout the Cold War, The Cuban Missile Crisis, The Vietnam Conflict, the Church Committee, the Balkans Conflicts, pre and post-9/11 operations, the 911 and WMD Commissions and the subsequent legislative overhaul mandated by the Congress in 2004.  The course will also review governance and oversight of the I.C., including roles of the Executive, Legislative and Judicial branches of government.  In addition to understanding the development of the I.C., students will study the functional elements of intelligence tradecraft (human intelligence, signals intelligence, imagery analysis, etc.), and engagement with international counterparts.  The class will participate in case studies, in which the students will evaluate, provide briefings and recommend decisions in realistic scenarios, both in terms of analysis and intelligence-driven decision-making on policy and operational matters.

PAI 730

PEACE AND CONFLICT IN THE BALKANS
This course is divided into three parts. The first part introduces students to the history, culture, and society of this controversial region. The second part of the course focuses on ethnic nationalism and the wars of Yugoslav dissolution. The final part of the course addresses the local effects of international humanitarian interventions, with a special focus on the politics of reconciliation and policies of reconstruction in postwar Bosnia and Herzegovina. Although the course concentrates on the former Yugoslavia and its successor states, other postwar regions will come up in collateral reading and discussion. Students are free and indeed encouraged to discuss readings other than those listed and to pursue their own interests in Balkan societies not touched upon in this course.  

PAI 730

US DEFENSE STRATEGY, MILITARY POTURE & COMBAT OPERATIONS, 2001-PRESENT
Governance and execution of National strategy by the Department of Defense, the Joint Staff and Combatant Commanders; national command and control of military forces; case studies of joint and combined operations overseas.  This course will examine the Defense Strategy of the U.S. and its allies, and its implementation by military forces from 2001 to the present.  Students will study national-level strategic guidance from the National Command Authority, and understand how national security is carried out by the Secretary of Defense, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Combatant Commanders and subordinate units.  International security dynamics and military posture related to terrorism and proliferation of nuclear and other weapons of mass effect will also be examined.  Students will participate in specific case studies of planning and execution of combat and humanitarian assistance operations with allied forces in Afghanistan, Iraq, Africa, Haiti, the Far East, Colombia, and on the high seas.  

PAI 730

RESPONDING TO PROLIFERATION
This course will examine the dangers caused by the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD), and strategies to address this threat. We will explore the current threat of proliferation to both state and non-state actors, and look at the factors that have led some states to choose not to develop such weapons. We will examine both national and international efforts to prevent the spread of WMD, ranging from diplomacy and arms control to counterproliferation strategies. The course will include discussion of theories about the spread of WMD, and efforts to control this spread both during and after the Cold War. The goal is to provide students with a strong grasp of the challenges presented by proliferation, and the strategies that have been developed to address this problem. 
The course is divided into two sections.  In the first section, we will examine the nature of the problem of proliferation, looking at the debate over whether proliferation is a problem, why states decide to go nuclear or not, and the ways in which weapons of mass destruction proliferate.  In the second section, we will examine strategies used to address the proliferation challenge, by both the U.S. and the international community.  In each section, we will look at particular cases as illustrations of the issues. 

PAI 730

HOMELAND SECURITY: FEDERAL POLICY AND IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES
This course will provide students with a thorough, broad-based understanding of the multiple challenges faced by the federal government in protecting the nation from a variety of threats, both human and natural.  Upon completion of the course, students will understand the complexities of the current security environment and the most important policy and operational questions facing federal, state and local government.  Class discussions, case studies and a simulation will provide an opportunity for students to become directly engaged in the implementation of various policy options.

PAI 730

DEVELOPMENT FINANCE
Financial services enable families to achieve their most important goals:  educating their children, gaining access to health care, investing in income generating activities, providing for old age, and smoothing consumption over time.  Understanding the role of microfinance in the lives of the general population can help policy makers increase the impact of programs and policies in the fields of environment, health, social services, small business promotion, and education.  You do not need a background in either economic theory or finance to take full advantage of this course.  This course familiarizes students with programs that offer credit, savings, insurance, and money transfer services to poor families in emerging markets and the impact these have on their lives.  Topics include microcredit, microfinance, and the emerging consensus around building inclusive financial systems that was recently endorsed by the G20.  We will cover the design of high value products for poor households, building sustainable institutions, and creating an inclusive financial ecosystem.  We will look closely at the role of government, non-profits, and international organizations in promoting access to finance as part of an overall effort to promote economic progress.

PAI 730

GIRLS EDUCATION IN A DEVELOPING WORLD 
Education of girls is one of the most effective means of enhancing the quality of life of all people in the world. Yet in many countries, girls' participation in school lags significantly behind that of boys.  This seminar type course will explore the benefits of girls education, will discuss many of the obstacles to higher numbers of girls in school, and will review the current state of play in various countries. The major student work project of the semester will be to write a business plan for how one specific country could take measures to significantly raise the numbers of girls in school.

PAI 730 

POLITICAL ECONOMY OF POLICY REFORM IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: EXPERIENCE FROM ASIA
The central focus of this course is on the political economy of policy reform in developing countries: the role and interplay of politics and institutions. Through an extensive use of cases, role-playing, class discussion, lectures, and exercises, the aim of the course is to help participants develop a better understanding of the political economy dimension of policy reform. It also intends to address the challenge of what policy makers, and policy analysts and advisors--inside and outside government, and in international institutions--can do to help increase the likelihood of effective reforms.

PAI 730

BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT IN THE GLOBAL ECONOMY: THE ASIAN EXPERIENCE
This course examines the interface between business and government in Asian development in the context of a changing international economy.  Globalization through the impact on the organization and location of the production of goods and services is changing the nature of international business and competition, with important implications for the relationship between business and government.  This is presenting both opportunities and challenges to government policy aimed at accelerating the development of Asian economies. The course blends problem-oriented case studies with lectures, background readings, and role-playing; and will be valuable for students with an interest in business-government relations; in economic development, particularly in Asia; and in the on-going challenges of globalization for developing economies.

PAI 730

HOMELAND SECURITY: STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT PREPAREDNESS AND RESPONSE 
This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of state and local governments, the public safety functions that they provide, and the critical leadership competencies and collaborative relationships necessary for their successful management.  Class lectures will address applicable theories and concepts, which students will then explore in current events and periodicals. The following areas will be addressed (1) Roles of state and local governments in the US federal system; (2) Political and social aspects of preparedness and response functions; (3) Structures of state and local governments and management implications; and (4) Public safety services and functions provided by federal, state and local governments.

PAI 731

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
Introductory, practical course for persons whose formal training in government finance, accounting, or financial analysis is limited to PPA 734 Public Budgeting. Focus is on basic financial and managerial accounting and reporting, including short and long-term financial decision-making, capital budgeting and the market for tax-exempt debt, public employee pensions, accounting principles for state and local governments and financial condition analysis.

Prerequisites PAI 734 Public Budgeting. Not open to students who have completed PAI 749 Financial Management in Nonprofit Organizations. 

PAI 735

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT FINANCE
Analyzes the expenditures and revenues of state and local governments plus fiscal aspects of intergovernmental relations. Course explores the determinants of state and urban economic development and local governments' fiscal behavior and develops criteria for selecting among policy alternatives. The assignments, and many of the class sessions, give students the opportunity to apply analytical techniques to actual problems in state and local public finance.

Prerequisite PAI 723 Economics for Public Decisions, or its equivalent.

PAI 736

ECONOMICS OF HEALTH AND HEALTH POLICY 
This course will teach basics of economics as applied to the health sector (health economics) with a focus on important and current health policy decisions faced by the United States and other nations. Examples include health care costs, insurance coverage, immunizations, smoking, and prescription drugs. We will use these methods to understand the challenges of health systems in the United States and a few other countries. 

PRE-REQUISITE:  There are no course pre-requisite requirements, however, knowledge of basic economics concepts is assumed.

PAI 742

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND LAW
This is a case study driven course. The objective of this class is to present the big picture of public law and public administration by examining who the major players are in the legal system, how the public and private law systems and processes diverge and come together, and how the public law system, its institutions and processes incorporate public administration. Specific sections include constitutional politics, the transformation of policy proposals into regulatory programs, constitutional limits on government action and others. 

Pre-requisites Not open to JD/MPA students. 

PAI 744

METROPOLITAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS
Metropolitan Government and Politics is a survey of issues involving metropolitan areas in the U.S. Course sessions center on financial, economic development, education, human services, operational, intergovernmental, neighborhood, personnel, management and governance issues that significantly influence metropolitan areas. Major course assignments involve an individual assignment on financial trend analysis (no accounting or finance experience required) and a team assignment at course end that synthesizes course work into a hypothetical strategic campaign strategy for a local government chief executive. Case studies, presentations by local government officials, and class discussions of readings are involved. 

PAI 746

ETHICS AND PUBLIC POLICY
In a democracy, those who make and implement public policy are charged with serving the interests and protecting the rights of everyone. They are obligated to act responsibly in using the powers and resources entrusted to them, to address fairly the competing demands and needs of their constituents. But, in the government’s distribution of benefits and burdens, public officials are constantly pressured by powerful individuals and institutions for special consideration, often at the expense of other citizens. Moreover, the issues confronting public decision-makers are frequently complex, involving conflicting values and strongly held preferences, incomplete and possibly unreliable information, and consequences that no one can foresee. Effectively serving the common good, then, requires that public officials exercise sound moral judgment in performing their duties – that their actions be defensible ethically as well as legally. It requires an appreciation of ethical principles and an understanding of their application in the tangled domain of public affairs. This course is designed to enhance students’ ability to think ethically about the means and ends of public policy. Accordingly, we will examine normative concepts and principles that typically enter into moral reasoning and use these tools in analyzing actual cases. In our case discussions, we will seek to get clear about moral issues facing the decision makers and explore how these issues might be resolved in ethically responsible ways. 

PAI 747

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT FOR THE PUBLIC SECTOR
This course is designed to introduce a number of traditional and contemporary issues in human resources management. We will examine the essential features of human resource management systems and the environments in which those systems operate. We will explore how the actions of and options available to public managers are shaped and constrained by political considerations. Theories and mechanisms for creating and sustaining high performance public agencies will be analyzed, and applied to critical issues confronting public managers. 

PAI 748

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT AND GOVERNANCE
This course looks at the management and governance of nonprofit organizations with an emphasis on human resource and strategic aspects. Topics include the legal establishment of nonprofit organizations, industry analysis, strategic planning, crisis prevention policies and practices, design of volunteer programs, governance systems, management of the dynamics of staff and board, and ethics and stakeholder accountability. Students explore the value of specific theories and tools for leaders of nonprofit organizations. 

PAI 749

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
Introductory, practical course for persons aiming for general management careers in nonprofit organizations and who have little or no previous training or experience in accounting and finance. Topics include: financial decision-making techniques; capital budgetng and debt financing; endowment management; financial accounting and reporting principles for not-for-profits; and analysis of financial statements.

Pre-requisites PAI 734 Public Budgeting. Not open to students who have completed PAI 731 Financial Management in State and Local Governments. 

PAI 751

JD/MPA SEMINAR: REGULATORY LAW AND POLICY
An advanced exploration of regulatory decision-making, focusing on the justifications and methods for implementing regulation; how policy, politics and law impact on regulatory decisions; case studies of regulatory programs, their successes and failures. This course is required for JD/MPA students, and must be taken in the 3rd year. JD/MPA STUDENTS MUST REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE AS A PAI COURSE.

Pre-requisites 3rd Yr JD/MPA Student Status or PAI 742: Public Administration and Law. 

PAI 752

MPA WORKSHOP
All MPA students participate in an intensive, four-week, full-time workshop that addresses current topics in public management.  Project assignments covering a broad array of topics are done in teams of 5-8 students.  Students have an opportunity to express choice of topics prior to the start of the workshops, but the department will make final assignments.  The objective of each workshop is application in the "real world" of the subject matter and techniques acquired in
previous MPA course work in research, analysis and report preparation.

The course will be offered in May immediately following the spring semester, and is  intensive, required, capstone course to the MPA degree. Students should note that a full-time commitment is required and outside work requirements are NOT recommended.   

PRE-REQUISITE:  Completion of the majority of MPA course work, orpermission of Workshop faculty.  Available to MPA students only.  Due to theteam nature of this course, students are not allowed to drop this course once teams are assembled.

PAI 753

EXECUTIVE LEADERSHIP SEMINAR
Executive Leadership is about YOU.  It is your time to reflect on and process your year at Maxwell.   It is about cultivating your own leadership style (and followership style when appropriate).  It is about transitioning from student to professional.  Topics covered include:  Interest-based negotiation as leadership,  work and conflict self assessment, negotiation in groups, managerial mediation as leadership, working with the media, ethical leadership, persuasion and advocacy as leadership, collaborative problem solving as leadership, negotiating in networks, entrepreneurship and creativity as leadership, and leadership styles and assessments.

The course will be offered in June immediately following the MPA Workshop, and is an intensive, required, course to the MPA degree. Students should note that a full-time commitment is required and outside work requirements are NOT recommended.    

PRE-REQUISITE:  Available to MPA students only. Completion of the majority of MPA coursework, or permission of Department.

PAI 756

POLICY AND ADMINISTRATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES 
This course will familiarize students with major players, policies and issues in international development cooperation/foreign aid. It includes an overview of development theories, development ethics, development finance, types of development/aid organizations (multi-laterals, bi-laterals, NGOs, etc.), aid modalities, challenges of aid effectiveness, and selected topics such as good governance or fragile states.The goal is to enable students to understand the roles and comparative advantages of major development actors and instruments, as well as critically assess current development debates, policies and reform efforts.

PAI 757

ECONOMICS OF DEVELOPMENT
This course (cross-listed in the economics dept.) will familiarize the student with a variety of alternative theories on what causes (or hinders) economic development. Different strategies and outcomes from a variety of settings will be presented and discussed. The goal of the course is to develop the student’s understanding of international, national, sectoral, local, and household level issues related to economic development and the language used by economists to discuss these issues. Special attention will be given to the following questions: Are there differences between economic growth and economic development?; What are the environmental implications of economic development?; and How are industrial/urban needs balanced against agricultural/rural needs in development? 

Prerequisite PAI 723 Economics for Public Decisions, or its equivalent. 

PAI 763

MANAGING NGO'S IN TRANSITIONAL AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
The later stages of the 20th century experienced a remarkable rise in the number and types of non-government organizations (NGOs) active in the developing world. The purpose of this course is to provide the students with some insight into the variety of roles that these organizations play in civil society while laying out some of the knowledge and skills required to operate NGOs effectively. Using mini-lectures, case studies, and a simulated project development exercise, the course will cover a broad range of topics including the origins of NGOs, how they are defined, their influences and how they are influenced, NGO boards, governance mechanisms, organizational structures, how NGOs develop a sense of mission and develop programs and projects in support of that mission, and how NGOs generate financial resources and sustain their projects and the organization.

PRE-REQUISITE:  Students should NOT enroll in both this course and PAI 748: Nonprofit Management and Governance due to significant course content overlap.

PAI 765

HUMANITARIAN ACTION: CHALLENGES, RESPONSES, RESULTS
This course examines major humanitarian challenges worldwide since 1992 including disasters caused by nature and by man, including conflicts and economic stress.  It also reviews key challenges for women, children, refugees, and displaced people, and the actions of governments, UN agencies, NGOs, militaries, donors, the press, and others.  Classes are a combination of lecture, discussion, student presentations, and videos.   Students are graded on their class participation, memos, group and individual presentations.

There is a course fee associated with registration for this class – to fund a mandatory field trip to the UN.

PAI 767

FUND DEVELOPMENT FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
This course examines the theory and practice of fund development for nonprofit organizations.  Students work with a nonprofit of their choosing to develop a portfolio of fund development products (for example, grant proposal, gift range chart, direct mail solicitation letter, planned giving ad, website solicitation, and telephone script).  Students examine the benchmarks, theoretical bases, and ethical issues associated with fund-development vehicles, campaigns (annual, campaign and endowment), and markets (individuals, foundations, clubs, and businesses).  The course reviews tools for evaluating a fund development program and developing comprehensive strategies.

PAI 772

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY
Discusses the interplay of science, technology and public policy. This course explores the relations of scientists and policymakers (knowledge and power). Technology is viewed as a resource that is both a tool of policy and a factor shaping policy. Moreover, various interests promote, oppose, and seek to control technology to "leverage" the future. Focus is on the United States, but attention is given also to other nations and their science and technology policies. A special concern is science, technology and environmental policy.

PAI 775

ENERGY, ENVIRONMENT & RESOURCE POLICY
Analyzes the relation of government to policymaking in the domain of energy, environment, and resources. Attention is given to politics and administration of energy/environment/resources policy in the US at all levels of government. Comparative and international aspects of the problem are also examined. Particular emphasis is given to environmental policy and the processes by which policy is formulated, implemented and modified.  

PAI 777

ECONOMICS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
In this course, we will apply the principles of economics to environmental problems. The main question in any economics course is how best to allocate scarce resources. This holds true for environmental economics as well. However, environmental resources differ from many other goods that economists study in that there is usually no market for them. Thus, government policies are needed to maintain and improve environmental quality. We will begin by examining how economic incentives lead to environmental problems, and discussing various options for dealing with these problems. Because economic analysis requires information on both cost and benefits, we next discuss methods for valuing the benefits of environmental amenities. The course concludes with a section that relates the lessons of environmental economics to the macroeconomy, with a focus on the effects of environmental policy and economic growth.

Prerequisites PAI 723 Economics for Public Decisions, or its equivalent. 

PAI 781

SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY
This course examines the social safety net in the United States.  After briefly surveying how social welfare policy is delivered, we’ll consider some fundamental conceptual questions:  What is the appropriate role of the state?  What are the drivers of economic inequality (and what can or should be done about rising economic inequality)?  How do we measure poverty?  What is the best way to alleviate it?  Then we will examine specific aspects of social welfare policy, including health policy--especially health reform (the affordable care act), Medicare and Medicaid (including long-term care); Social Security; welfare reform; employment; housing and homelessness; education; and policies affecting children and people with disabilities.  We’ll track the political debate surrounding the 2012 presidential election campaign and what that means for current and future social welfare policy in the US.  We’ll also compare US policy with that in other rich countries

PAI 782

HEALTH SERVICES MANAGEMENT
This course is designed to identify the approaches and tools required for successful management of health care organizations in a changing environment and coping with the patchwork quilt of non-profit, public and for-profit enterprise in the health care delivery system. Using a case study format, the course starts with a discussion of ethical issues that affect individuals involved in health services management. The discussion then extends into organizational ethics. The course explores the governance function where an organization’s overall direction should come from, moves into the strategic and business planning that implements the direction and finally examines how managers implement (or try to implement) these plans. This is a required course for the HSMP certificate/program of study.

Pre-requisites PAI 783: The Changing American Health Care System, or permission of instructor. 

PAI 783

CHANGING AMERICAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEM
The objective of this course is to examine the health care system in America and to explore the change it is undergoing. The evolution of the organizations (hospitals, nursing homes, home care agencies, etc.) and the people (physicians, nurses, social workers, etc.) making up the system will be examined. How these organizations and people and their relationships are changing in response to an environment of development of integrated delivery systems and restructuring of the financing systems as we know them will be explored. Public policy implications of these changes on the public health system and the social services system will be examined. This is a required course for the HSMP certificate/program of study requirement. 

PAI 784

EDUCATION POLICY 
The last several decades have witnessed dramatic changes in school finance systems, and far-reaching proposals to reform the structure, accountability systems, and operation of public schools. The purpose of this course is to provide you an overview of education finance and policies to reform American schools.  While it is impossible in one semester to provide an in-depth analysis of such a broad topic, we will cover many of the major reforms which have received attention, such as education vouchers, charter schools, site-based management, school accountability systems, merit pay and comprehensive urban school reforms. These education topics will be examined using the tools and theories from micro-economics, policy analysis and program evaluation.

PAI 785

IMPLEMENTATION OF SOCIAL POLICY
Implementation is management. It is managing policies and programs that are brand new, those that are being modified, and those that are replacing existing programs. Policy in all its forms come to managers in clear, direct, and measurable forms, but also with conflicting mandates, ambiguous directives, and measures that are not well defined or all that observable. There are many actors and institutions that shape the formulation and context of policy and fund and regulate policies and programs. Implementation is an integral part of the policy process and public sector governance and one that is dynamic, unpredictable, time consuming, and often does not occur in a straight-forward, linear process. This course is designed to: (1) Familiarize students with the theoretical and conceptual models used to understand the policy implementation process. (2) Examine implementation frameworks, the myriad actors and institutions that seek to influence the implementation of policy, tools for implementing policy, and more generally becoming aware of just how complex and difficult managing implementation can be. (3) Develop the analytical, reflective, and adaptive thinking skills from which managers, policy analysts, and advocates need to improve their ability to implement policy.

PAI 786

URBAN POLICY
Many of the most difficult problems facing public policy makers are concentrated in urban areas. These problems include poverty and unemployment, discrimination in housing and labor markets, homelessness, and a lack of affordable housing. This course develops analytical tools for understanding these problems and explores alternative policies for dealing with them. Class sessions include lectures and case discussions, with many opportunities for students to develop and present their own view on these complex topics.

Prerequisite PAI 723 Economics for Public Decisions, or permission of instructor.

PPA 890

INDEPENDENT STUDY Prerequisite Proposal required.

PAI 895

EXECUTIVE EDUCATION SEMINAR: MANAGERIAL LEADERSHIP
Objectives are to establish an understanding of the schools of leadership thinking, especially current trends, to practice requisite skills, and to plan for additional learning and development through assessment and action planning. Course readings focus on leadership theory and practice and their application in the changing organizational environment.

Prerequisite Open to Executive MA/Executuve MPA students only.

Requirements Several short application papers; research paper, action plan.

PAI 896

EXECUTIVE EDUCATION SEMINAR: HR MANAGEMENT
This seminar will have three primary emphases: the examination of major reform priorities in human resource management; the extent to which capacity for effective implementation is considered in reform design; and the extent to which the capacity necessary for effective implementation can be created in a variety of national settings.

The design of this course incorporates an examination of major elements of human resource management policies in both western industrial and developing nations, as well as discussion of the national experiences of students in the seminar. The discussion of creating the necessary administrative capacity will include analysis and use of the capacity model created by the Government Performance Project. This framework will allow discussion of reform design and implementation experience in different national and governmental contexts to be more rigorously comparative, and will also allow the creation of comparative case studies.

Preparation and analysis of the cases will be a primary student responsibility; the cases, in their various stages of development will be a significant teaching tool in the seminar. Each student will be responsible for a case with which s/he has had – or expects to have – personal experience. As this suggests, the seminar is targeted toward the senior government officials and representatives of NGOs enrolled in the Executive Education program; MPAs with some governmental experience will also find the seminar useful.

Prerequisite While this satisfies an Executive MA/Executive MPA Core Requirement – the course is open to MPA students who have prior work experience. MPA students should meet with the professor if they are interested in taking this course.  

PAI 897

FUNDAMENTALS OF POLICY ANALYSIS
This course considers the rationale for and limits to public sector policies and how those policies can be analyzed prior to their implementation with a portion of the course devoted to cost-benefit analysis.  Although the principles of economics are relied upon heavily in the course, no prior training in the subject is assumed. 

PRE-REQUISITE:  Open to EMPA Students ONLY.

PAI 996

MASTER'S PROJECT PAPER
This is the capstone course and a core requirement for the MA degree. Students will participate through project teams to solve a public management or policy analysis problem defined by a sponsoring organization (e.g. The United Nations, US Congressional Research Service). Topics on project management and group dynamics will be covered to support student project teams as they work over the semester with sponsors and faculty advisors to complete their project. Students are expected to integrate material from all other parts of the EMPA curriculum in their work. A final oral presentation and a written report to the sponsor and faculty advisor are the major course requirements.

Prerequisite Open to Executive MA/ Executive MPA students only.

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Department of Public Administration and International Affairs | Maxwell School | Syracuse University | 215 Eggers Hall | Syracuse, NY 13244-1020 | 315.443.4000 | Fax: 315-443-9721