• CASES AND SIMULATIONS

  • Policy Area: Emergency

  • Collaboration Amid Crisis: The Department of Defense During Hurricane Katrina

    Using the context of Hurricane Katrina, this case examines the relationship between FEMA, the chief coordinator of federal response efforts, and the most powerful, single actor that FEMA can call upon, the Department of Defense. AUTHOR: Donald P. Moynihan, University of Madison, Wisconsin. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2008

     

    Collaboration Gone Awry: A Struggle for Power and Control over Service Delivery in the Non-Profit Sector.

    In this simulation, entitled "Exploring Perspectives of Individual Collaborating Organizations," several nonprofit and government agencies come together to develop and implement a streamlined first response protocol for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. Students practice collaborative problem solving from the perspective of five organizations and their representatives. AUTHORS: Melissa Brazil and Eli Teram, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2010

     

    Collaboration Gone Awry: A Struggle for Power and Control over Service Delivery in the Nonprofit Sector

    In this case, entitled "The Action Committee Collaboration Initiative," several nonprofit and government agencies struggle as they come together to develop and implement a streamline first response for victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. AUTHORS: Melissa Brazil and Eli Teram, Wilfrid Laurier University, Canada. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Case Competition, 2009

     

    Creating a Community Partnership

    For this simulation, students must craft a proposal that reflects a federal funder’s goal of using multiorganizational partnerships to address public issues at the local level. Proposals must explain how partnerships will be structured, how networks will be managed, what governance issues are likely to arise, and how success will be measured. AUTHORS: Keith Provan and Brint Milward, University of Arizona. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2007

     

    DeBola: A Prisoner's Dilemma Simulation-Game for NGOs

    DeBola is a prisoners dilemma simulation-game for teaching collaborative problem solving, conflict analysis and resolution, negotiation, and decision-making. Specifically, it does so in the context of NGOs and mission-driven organizations. Set against the background of ongoing Ebola outbreaks in Africa, a scenario right out of today’s headlines, it offers participants the sense of applying their analysis and skills to real-world problems.  AUTHOR: Noam Ebner, of Creighton University School of Law. Winner First Place, Best Teaching Simulation Competition 2017

     

    Emergency Management and Homeland Security: Interagency Collaboration - Emergency!

    Public officials engage in a six-party negotiation to develop a plan to use federal funds for emergency preparedness, agree on an on-going relationship, and develop a press strategy. This role-play simulation works best for participants who have experience with interest-based negotiation. AUTHORS: David E. Booher and Adam Sutkus, Center for Collaborative Policy, California State University Sacramento. Honorable mention, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2008
     

    FlashPoint: Syria, 2014 –– An International Conflict Management Simulation

    This simulation game is constructed as a teaching tool for the topics of conflict analysis and resolution, collaboration, negotiation, mediation and public international law. Set against the background of the ongoing crisis in Syria, it offers students the sense of applying their analysis and skills to real-world problems; it can be updated to reflect the realities in the region as these develop and change. AUTHORS: Noam Ebner, Creighton Univ. Law School; Yael Efron, Zefat College School of Law; Nellie Munin, Zefat Academic College. First Place Award, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2014

     

    Model EU-European Council-European Agenda on Migration Simulation

    The European Agenda on Migration focuses on the issue of migration to the EU in the midst of an ongoing humanitarian crisis. It is a teaching-tool for undergraduate and graduate courses on such topics as European Union studies, international organizations, international relations, conflict analysis and resolution, negotiation, mediation, and international law. It can also for preparing for or conducting Model European conferences. AUTHORS: Noam Ebner, Professor, Negotiation and Conflict Resolution (NCR) Program, Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, Creighton University; Alexandru Balas, Director, Clark Center for Global Engagement and Assistant Professor of International Studies, SUNY Cortland; Andreas Kotelis, Visiting Instructor at SUNY-Cortland; and the EU Delegation to the U.S.  First Place Award, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2018. 
     

    Roles of Public Managers in Networked Governance

    This simulation provides students the opportunity to engage in a negotiation process to develop a land tenure system to resolve land disputes in a post-disaster context in a developing country. Students will take on roles shaped by different ways of knowing, values, and expertise in the negotiation and reflect on roles of public managers in resolving conflicting points of view and manifestations of knowledge and power regarding post-disaster redevelopment and land tenure.  AUTHORS: William Butler,  Catherine Lampi, and Francisco Rosado, Florida State University's Department of Urban and Regional Planning.  Honorable Mention, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2016. 
     

    Ukraine in Conflict

    Ukraine in Conflict is a negotiation simulation based on the events following the Ukrainian revolution of December 2013.  This simulation can be used to teach negotiation, mediation, conflict resolution, and international conflict. Based on events occurring in Ukraine in 2014, the simulation allows for a realistic situation with very possible roles and outcomes.  AUTHORS: Zachary Barr, and Steven Smutko, University of Wyoming. Honorable Mention, Best Teaching Simulation Competition, 2015.