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  • Faricy weighs in on Democrat's proposed tax strategy in WSJ

    Top Democrats are in the process of designing a roughly $1 trillion infrastructure deal, and a second, broader antipoverty package and they need to resolve differences over the amount of spending, how much must be paid for, and which of Mr. Biden’s proposed tax increases should advance. "A lot of Democratic voters are moderate to conservative. A lot of Democratic voters have low trust in government,” says Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science. "You have to tie it to something that is popular, that you can sell to people that will be an improvement in their day-to-day lives." Read more in the Wall Street Journal article, "Democrats Focus on Turning Tax Talk Into Action."

     

    Gadarian quoted in Vox piece on political polarization, COVID vaccine

    The COVID-19 epidemic in the U.S., at face value, has become a division between those who are vaccinated and those who are unvaccinated. But, increasingly, it’s also a division between Democrats and Republicans—as vaccination has ended up on one of the biggest dividing lines in the U.S., political polarization. "Partisanship is now the strongest and most consistent divider in health behaviors," says Professor Shana Gadarian. "It didn’t have to be this way," Gadarian says. "There’s really nothing about the nature of being a right-wing party that would require undercutting the threat of COVID from the very beginning." Gadarian was quoted in the Vox article, "How political polarization broke America’s vaccine campaign."

     

    Gueorguiev quoted in SCMP piece on Chinese human rights abuses, UN

    Highlighting the one-year anniversary of Hong Kong’s controversial national security law (NSL) and also focusing on mainland China’s far-western autonomous regions of Xinjiang and Tibet, the [U.S.] Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC), asked UN Secretary General António Guterres for "immediate measures to closely monitor and assess China’s behaviour." "Letters and appeals to [Guterres], as opposed to ambassadorial diplomacy, are more about public position-taking and signaling than they are about actual results," says Dimitar Gueorguiev, associate professor of political science. Read more in the South China Morning Post article, "US agency urges UN to move on investigation of alleged human rights abuses in China."

     

    Michelmore featured in WAER article on changes to Child Tax Credit

    The American Rescue Plan allows families, regardless of work status, to claim a tax credit up to $300 per month per child under the age of 17. "I think importantly in contrast to something that comes in a lump sum, which has its own benefits itself, getting something on a regular basis gives families something they can count on," says Katherine Michelmore, associate professor of public administration and international affairs. "So gives them some consistency, so they can count on getting this benefit every month, particularly if there’s some unexpected expenses that come up." Michelmore was featured in the WAER article, "Could New Child Tax Credit End Poverty for Many US Children? SU Expert on Impact."

     

    Thompson discusses US-Vatican relationship in The Hill

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken recently visited with Pope Francis in what was seen as an attempt to reset relations between Washington and the Holy See following former President Trump’s administration. "In this meeting, it seems that there was far more cordiality and acknowledgment of what the U.S. and Vatican have in common," says Margaret Susan Thompson. "I think this is emblematic of Pope Francis’s entire papacy that he has always emphasized a more comprehensive view of Catholic social teaching, he is not a single-issue pope," Thompson says. "There’s plenty about the Biden administration that the pope can work with. There’s plenty of areas they can agree on." Read more in The Hill article, "Post-Trump, Biden seeks to restore US relations with Holy See."

     

    Hamersma study on health insurance, children's mental health published

    "The effect of public health insurance expansions on the mental and behavioral health of girls and boys," co-authored by Associate Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Sarah Hamersma, was published in Social Science & Medicine. The authors leverage major expansions in public health insurance eligibility for children and adolescents under Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program during 1997–2002 to examine mental health care utilization and outcomes for children in the National Survey of America's Families. They found the expansions are associated with an estimated 30% reduction in mental health care utilization for girls, but no measurable effect for boys, which may partly be accounted for by increased well-child visits for girls.

     

    Sociologists explore veteran service-connected disability in new study

    "Service-Connected Disability and the Veteran Mortality Disadvantage," co-authored by Maxwell sociologists Scott Landes, Andrew London and Janet Wilmoth, was published in Armed Forces & Society. Their results indicate that service-connected disability status accounts for some variation in, and may have a cumulative effect on, the veteran mortality disadvantage. Future research should account for service-connected disability status when studying veteran–nonveteran mortality differentials.

     

    Dwidar study on group lobbying, public policy published in PSJ

    "Diverse Lobbying Coalitions and Influence in Notice-and-Comment Rulemaking," authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Maraam Dwidar, was published in Policy Studies Journal. Dwidar tested the influence of diverse coalitions of interest groups on bureaucratic policy outputs by analyzing a new dataset of organizations’ co-signed public comments across nearly 350 federal agency rules proposed between 2005 and 2015. She found that agencies favor recommendations from organizationally diverse coalitions, and not coalitions that are bipartisan or dominated by business interests.

     

    Pralle examines changes in flood insurance rate maps in RHCPP

    "To appeal and amend: Changes to recently updated Flood Insurance Rate Maps," co-authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Sarah Pralle, was published in Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy. The findings suggest changes to flood zones on Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) occur more often where people have greater socioeconomic means, raising questions of equity for future FIRM appeals and revisions.

     

    Wolf study on minimum wage, infant mortality featured on CNY Central

    A study by Douglas Wolf, Gerald B. Cramer Professor of Aging Studies, was featured in the CNY Central article "New SU study shows that raising the minimum wage could save lives." "Increasing the minimum wage benefits people who are not working but are somehow in the economic orbit of those who are," says Wolf. The study looked at data from 2001 to 2018 in states that have laws against raising the minimum wage, which did not include New York. "If those areas had been able to raise the minimum wage about 600 infant deaths would have been prevented," Wolf says.

     

    Schwartz quoted in EdSurge article on challenges of student mobility

    In Chelsea, Massachusetts, high student mobility used to be a challenge without a clear solution. But then the district formed the Five District Partnership to develop curriculum in tandem and make moving a bit easier. There’s new interest in the model as schools and communities suddenly face big changes in enrollment as a result of the pandemic. "It’s not like kids are moving from Boston to Chicago to LA and then back again,” says Amy Ellen Schwartz, Daniel Patrick Moynihan Chair in Public Affairs. "Kids for whom housing instability is a problem, many of them are moving around in the same urban area." Read more in the EdSurge article, "School Is Hard for Mobile Students. These Districts Want to Help."

     

    Khalil speaks to SBG about Iran's president-elect Ebrahim Raisi

    The Biden administration has made clear that reestablishing the nuclear agreement with Iran is a top concern for his administration. Experts say that may be increasingly possible following the election of hardline leader Ebrahim Raisi but any negotiations beyond the original 2015 nuclear deal could prove difficult if not impossible under Iran's new hardline president. The election of Raisi was a "mixed bag" for President Biden, says Osamah Khalil. "In the short term, it will likely enable a renewed JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action). In the longer term, it will make it more difficult to have an expanded agreement or expanded relations with Iran," he says. Read more in the Sinclair Broadcast Group article, "Iran's new hardline president could complicate Biden's foreign policy agenda."

     

    Banks discusses Dept. of Justice secret subpoenas on Bloomberg Law

    On the latest Bloomberg Law podcast episode, Professor Emeritus and national security law expert William Banks discussed the controversy over revelations the Justice Department under former President Donald Trump had secretly subpoenaed records from House Democrats, former White House counsel Don McGahn and members of the media.

     

    Thompson quoted in The Hill article on banning communion for Biden

    U.S. bishops are set to open a debate over whether President Biden, the second Catholic president in U.S. history, and other politicians should be denied communion based on their stance on abortion. It promises to be a testy discussion on a sensitive issue that is dividing people from the top of the Vatican, with some bishops eager to make an example of Biden and others warning this would weaponize the Holy Communion. "There really is a tension between bishops and that tension has always existed in the USCCB (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops), it’s always been there. It’s just a question of what is predominant," says Margaret Susan Thompson. She was quoted in The Hill article, "Bishops to debate banning communion for president."

     

    Khalil weighs in on end of Israel PM Netanyahu's career in USA Today

    Israel's parliament cast a historic vote on Sunday that ended Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister and ushered in a "change coalition" that includes hardline factions, centrists and an Arab party, the first ever in an Israeli government. "It is a watershed moment," says Osamah Khalil. It may be a "Nixon-goes-to-China" pivot in Israeli politics—making it easier for future Israeli politicians to join forces with Arab parties after the hardline Bennett took that first step, he adds. Read more in the USA Today article, "'Watershed moment': Netanyahu’s fate on the line as Israel prepares for historic vote." Khalil was also quoted in the USA Today article, "Who is Naftali Bennett, Israel’s next prime minister if Benjamin Netanyahu is ousted?"

     

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