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  • Maxwell scholars publish book on public policy and the life course

    Janet M. Wilmoth and Andrew S. London, two professors from the Maxwell School’s Department of Sociology, the Aging Studies Institute and the Center for Aging and Policy Studies, co-edited a new book “Life-Course Implications of U.S. Public Policies” (Routledge, 2021). Professors Colleen Heflin, Madonna Harrington Meyer and Jennifer Karas Montez, along with Ph.D. student Amra Kandic, contributed to the book.

     

    Khalil discusses current violence in the Middle East with USA Today

    The current violence between Israelis and Palestinians is the deadliest seen in years. The events have prompted increased pressure on President Joe Biden to do more to resolve the conflict. "I don't think Biden wanted anything to do with this issue," says Osamah Khalil, associate professor of history. "He wanted to manage it, and by managing it meaning ignore it. And now, here it is." Read more in the USA Today article, "'Every incendiary ingredient imaginable': Here's what sparked worst Mideast violence since 2014."

     

    Dutkowsky talks to CNY Central about getting people back to work

    Employers are struggling to find employees and many say the current unemployment benefits are to blame. Due to the pandemic, the federal government is giving an extra $300 a week in addition to the normal unemployment benefits. Professor Emeritus Don Dutkowsky says, “I want to see what happens in August and September when the unemployment benefits go off because you will see people looking for and accepting jobs.” Dutkowsky was interviewed for the CNY Central story, "CNY economic experts weigh in on the ways to bring people back to the workforce."

     

    Sultana explains why climate, COVID crises need feminism in The Hill

    Instead of analyzing the climate change and COVID-19 crises separately, Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment, suggests we learn more by looking at how they intersect. "Both climate change and the coronavirus pandemic have uneven, unequal and long-lasting impacts that depend on where you live, who you are, and what you have," says Sultana. "Approaching these crises by centering feminism can help formulate fairer policies and projects that help improve life for everyone." Read more in Sultana's article, "Climate and COVID-19 crises both need feminism – here's why," published in The Hill.

     

    Yingyi Ma weighs in on lack of AAPI history taught in schools in SCMP

    Asian Americans represent a diverse population of more than 23 million—or about 7 per cent of the total U.S. population, yet Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) history remains largely absent in U.S. schools. "There are a lot of reasons, but I think it’s largely the ‘invisibility’ of Asian-Americans," says Yingyi Ma, associate professor of sociology. "They’re almost like a forgotten minority in our discussion of social justice and equality." Read more in the South China Morning Post article, "Amid a wave of violence against Asian-Americans, some push for more of their history in classrooms."

     

    Elizabeth Cohen quoted in TIME article on future of VOICE

    For four years, the Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement office (VOICE) was used by the White House to perpetuate Trump’s false narrative of an immigrant crime wave. The VOICE office was an integral part of the effort to "trawl for anecdotes to then trumpet and publicize because there wasn’t good data to demonstrate that there’s a massive problem with non-citizen criminality," says Elizabeth Cohen, professor of political science and expert on immigration. She was quoted in the TIME article, "Trump Created an Office That Highlighted Immigrant Crime. Biden's DHS Plans to Keep It."

     

    O'Keefe talks to CNN about Boom Supersonic aircraft

    Boom Supersonic is one of several start-ups working on reviving supersonic air travel. Its long-term ambition is to get anywhere in the world in four hours at a price point of just $100. "It's an audacious goal!" says University Professor Sean O'Keefe. While it's feasible, O'Keefe reckons "it's going to require two or three generations of technology, development and breakthrough—which equates to about 20 years." Read more in the CNN article, "Boom Supersonic: 'Anywhere in the world in four hours for $100'."

     

    Khalil weighs in on Biden-Netanyahu relationship in USA Today

    The relationship between President Joe Biden and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has not been without tension over the years. But nothing frayed U.S.-Israel relationships more than the 2015 nuclear deal forged by the Obama administration in concert with other world powers. "Netanyahu had been so anti-Obama and had really ingratiated himself (with the GOP)," says Osamah Khalil, associate professor of history. "And the Republican Party itself wanted to use Netanyahu to criticize Obama in any way they could." That dynamic almost certainly "grated" on Biden as he continued his dealings with Netanyahu, Khalil says. Read more in the USA Today article, "From friendly to frosty, Biden and Netanyahu's decades-long relationship tested by current crisis."

     

    Steinberg discusses Biden's China policy review in National Interest

    Since 1979, the U.S. has taken a “one China” position: the United States recognizes the People's Republic of China as the sole legal government of China (PRC) but only acknowledges the Chinese position that Taiwan is part of China. Thus, the U.S. maintains formal relations with the PRC and has unofficial relations with Taiwan. In his article, "Brace Yourself for the Outcome of Biden’s China Policy Review," published in the National Interest, University Professor James Steinberg discusses why "There are powerful reasons to sustain the One China policy, but equally powerful reasons to adapt it to meet the realities of today."

     

    Monmonier receives Chancellor's Lifetime Achievement award

    As he wraps up a nearly 50-year career with the Maxwell School, Mark Monmonier, Distinguished Professor of Geography and the Environment, has received the Chancellor’s Citation for Excellence Lifetime Achievement Award. The honor recognizes those at Syracuse University who have made extraordinary contributions to the undergraduate experience and research excellence, have fostered innovation and have supported student veterans. It was announced during the virtual One University Awards ceremony on May 7, 2021.

     

    McCormick quoted in AP article on deadly protests in Colombia

    Thousands of Colombians have taken to the streets to vent their anger at the government. But the mostly peaceful, nationwide protests have turned deadly, with at least 26 people killed and human rights groups warning of increasing abuses by security forces. Police in Colombia have been "armed to the teeth" for decades as they fought along the military against guerrillas and drug traffickers, says Gladys McCormick. "Many of these officers kind of came of age as a result of that culture, but also they have the weaponry," McCormick says. "So, their go-to response is always to sort of like go hard line and then ask questions later." Read more in the Associated Press article, "Corruption, economic woes spark deadly protests in Colombia."

     

    Van Slyke talks to Capital Tonight about fighting climate change

    Dean David Van Slyke discusses the need for government to work with the private sector and help facilitate a multi-faceted approach to triage, mitigate and prevent the effects of climate change in the coming years. "There really has to be a different governance approach to create mutually beneficial outcomes where those different partners can act out," says Van Slyke. Watch his full interview with Capital Tonight, "What role can government play in fighting climate change?"

     

    Maxwell faculty, staff and students honored with 2021 One University awards

    Syracuse University announced its 2021 One University Awards, honoring members of the University community for their scholarship, teaching, academic achievement, leadership and service. The ceremony was held virtually this year due to COVID-19 precautions.

     

    Gadarian talks to WAER about Biden's proposals in speech to Congress

    Shana Gadarian, associate professor and chair of political science, says the agenda President Biden laid out in his speech to a joint session of Congress is a vision that government can help people and be used for good. "This is a moment where the public in the election and public opinion polls is open to using big social policies and big government bills to try and help spur economic growth and rescue a lot of the industries that were hurt very badly by the pandemic," says Gadarian. Read more in the WAER article, "Biden Proposals 'Nothing Short of Revolutionary' For Families Hurt By Pandemic."

     

    Popp discusses Biden's infrastructure plan, cutting emissions in Grist

    President Biden wants the U.S. to cut greenhouse gas emissions 50 to 52 percent by 2030. The administration’s best hope for meeting that 50 percent reduction target appears to be his $2 trillion infrastructure package. But as currently envisioned, the package doesn’t include legally binding limits on carbon pollution. "The infrastructure plan to me is a down payment," says Professor David Popp. "Without the ‘stick’—without some national level policy that puts a cap on emissions—it’s hard to make a credible case that we’ll definitely be able to follow through" on the 50 percent goal, Popp says. Read more in the Grist article, "Biden’s only hope to cut emissions in half? His infrastructure plan."

     

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