Institute for Historical Studies - Fellowships

Amount Note:

Fellowships for tenure-track and tenured faculty will provide stipends equal to half salary up to $50,000 per year. Fellowships for post-doctoral and independent scholars will provide 12-month salaries of $47,476 per year and medical insurance. Both fellowships are also available pro-rated for the semester.

Eligibility Note:

Junior fellows must have PhDs in hand no later than December 31 of the year preceding the year of the fellowship. Fellows must be resident in Austin during the term of their appointment and are expected to participate actively and regularly in the institute's programming. The fellowships are not restricted to historians, but projects must have significant historical content.

The Institute for Historical Studies (IHS) expects to appoint resident fellows for 2018-19 whose work engages with the year's theme of Genealogies of Freedom. Fellowships are available for all ranks.  They are not restricted to historians, but projects must have significant historical content. Fellows must be resident in Austin during the term of their appointment and are expected to participate actively and regularly in the institute's programming. Each fellow will present a pre-circulated paper at the institute's workshops. Fellows may also be invited to participate in other programming at The University of Texas at Austin.

Genealogies of Freedom, 2018-19

The meaning of the word “freedom” is often taken for granted today, as if it means the same thing to everyone. This is true for the English term as well as for its equivalents in other languages. Yet the concept and practice of freedom have a rich and complex history, one that has been written, in Foucault’s phrase, on “entangled and confused parchments.” For its 2018-19 theme, the Institute for Historical Studies calls for projects that can help us understand the dynamic, shifting course of concepts of freedom over time and space. We seek an understanding that is attentive to disparity, contingency, and rupture, and that takes into account issues of language, religion, class, race, gender and sexuality.  Among the questions that might be considered: How is the freedom of one group dependent upon the “unfreedom” of others? How have social practices served to thwart legally mandated freedoms (as in post-abolition societies)? How have theology and ideology molded conceptualizations of freedom? When cultures have come into contact, benignly or violently, how have concepts of freedom been conveyed across cultural and linguistic barriers?

Last Updated On: 2017-11-29

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