Past Summer Research Grant Recipients


2017 Recipients

Jessica Posega 2017 recipientJessica Posega

Bio and Research Proposal

Jessica Posega is a third year PhD student in Anthropology at Syracuse University. She earned her BS in Anthropology from Michigan Technological University in 2012, and her MA in Anthropology in 2014. Her dissertation, “(Re)Productive Lives: Exploring Life Histories of Pro-Choice Volunteers and Activists in Ireland and Northern Ireland” is a multi-sited project using life histories of pro-choice activists in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland as the starting point for exploring their social networks on multiple levels from local, national, all island, and international. Active members of these pro-choice networks represent a range in terms of age, gender identity, religion, and nation of origin. Many activists and pro-choice groups rely on the discourse of women’s rights as human rights, that engages with notions of autonomy and bodily citizenship. Her project uses a collaborative research model grounded in life history methodology with a feminist, critical medical anthropology approach to contextualize and frame the lives of national and multinational volunteers’ work for pro-choice causes in Ireland and Northern Ireland. This approach allows for critical interpretation of the data, and the research itself, from the individual to the global level. It also allows for comparisons across life histories that illuminate the ways in which reproductive rights, abortion, citizenship and stigma are conceptualized through individual narratives and how they reflect different cultural, economic, political, and legal contexts.

Whitney Baillie 2017 recipientWhitney Baillie

Bio and Research Proposal

Whitney Baillie is a third year PhD student in the Political Science Department at Syracuse University. She previously completed her BA in International Relations from McKendree University and her MPA from Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Her dissertation examines how nuclear security guarantees impact the integrity and durability of the nonproliferation regime. Her work this summer will examine Ireland’s reaction to the use of nuclear guarantees through research at the National Archives of Ireland.

Julie M. Ficarra 2017 recipientJulie M. Ficarra

Bio and Research Proposal

Julie is a third-year doctoral student in Cultural Foundations of Education. She earned an Ed.M in International Education Policy from Harvard University and a B.A. in Cultural Anthropology and International Studies from the University at Buffalo (UB). Julie has held professional positions in curricular internationalization strategy at the SUNY Office of Global Affairs, as well as in study abroad programs at UB, Harvard, and the University of South Florida. She was an Una Chapman Cox Fellow at the U.S. Department of State from 2010 - 2011 holding assignments in the Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs and at the U.S. Embassy in Mbabane, Swaziland. Her dissertation research draws attention to a disconnect between U.S. higher education internationalization policy rhetoric which centers ideas of mutual cross-cultural exchange, and study abroad research, which focuses almost exclusively on the educational and experiential outcomes of the U.S. based participant.  Through in-depth interviews with host community members in the popular study abroad destinations of San Jose, Costa Rica and Florence, Italy this project focuses instead on how those who engage with U.S. based students while they are studying abroad are impacted by those encounters.


2016 Recipients

Claire Sigsworth 2016 recipientClaire Sigsworth

Bio and Research Proposal

Claire Sigsworth joined the Maxwell School’s political science PhD program in 2015, after earning a law degree from Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen, UK. Prior to that, her non-academic career included time working as a political researcher for BBC News, and almost a decade promoting and enforcing UK freedom of information laws. Her research interests are focused on the intersection of constitutional law and politics, and particularly human rights law.  During summer 2016 she will spend time in Strasbourg, France, exploring a potential dissertation topic that would investigate how the European Court of Human Rights’ evolving interpretation of European human rights protections arises out of, and contributes to, an ongoing dialogue between the Court, national governments and civil society actors in Europe.  She is very grateful to receive a Moynihan Institute’s summer research grant, which will allow her to travel from Strasbourg to Florence, Italy, to attend a specialized conference about the Court’s evolving interpretation. Attending this conference will provide invaluable opportunities to network with scholars and judges who share her interests, and to learn more about the current state of research in her field.

Giles David Arceneaux 2016 recipientGiles David Arceneaux

Bio and Research Proposal

Giles David Arceneaux is a Ph.D. candidate in political science at Syracuse University. David holds an MA in political science from Syracuse University and an MA in international affairs from the Bush School of Government and Public Service at Texas A&M University. His dissertation examines the dynamics of nuclear arsenal management in emerging nuclear nations. He asks: under what conditions do regional nuclear powers exhibit aggressive state behavior? To answer this question, David investigates why some states are more likely to initiate and escalate disputes. As disputes escalate, nuclear command and control systems are placed under duress and the risk of accidental or unauthorized nuclear use increases. Accordingly, any state that initiates or escalates a dispute also creates circumstances that provide additional opportunities for nuclear mismanagement. David provides an explanation of escalatory behavior in regional nuclear powers by demonstrating the organizational and institutional effects of military influence on political decision-making. Specifically, the project demonstrates that an increased level of military influence in politics directly leads to an increased likelihood of dispute initiation, while also creating institutions of command and control that incentivize responsive escalation during disputes. In addition to the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs Center for European Studies, David’s research has received funding from the Smith Richardson Foundation and the Tobin Project, among others.

Kishauna Soljour 2016 recipientKishauna Soljour

Bio and Research Proposal

Kishauna Soljour received her BA in African American Studies and Television, Radio and Film from Syracuse University in 2013. She is currently a PhD student in the History Department at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs specializing in the modern African Diaspora and transnational history. Her research interests include the cultural and political history of immigration, racial identity, gender and citizenship in contemporary France. Her dissertation explores the experiences of Sub-Saharan African immigrants in post-colonial France. This summer, her work will examine colonial reports relating to Sub-Saharan African worker migration to France during 1945-1975 at the Archives d’Outre Mer—Afrique Equatorial Française in Aix-en-Provence, France. 


2015 Recipients

Jesse Quinn 2015 recipientJesse Quinn

Bio and Research Proposal

Jesse Quinn is currently a Ph.D. student in the Department of Geography in Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. In his dissertation research he studies environmental governance and territorial claims in formerly Soviet countries, specifically focusing on gold mining and identity in the Republic of Georgia. He completed his MA in geography at the University of Arizona in 2013, and BA in geography and film & media studies at Colgate University in 2007. In the years before returning to school he worked as an associate producer for National Geographic Television making documentary films about wildlife. When he is not reading about mining regulations or teaching undergraduates about cultural geography, he enjoys skiing with his partner Martha and their dogs, as well as catching up on the latest season of Game of Thrones.

Jessica Pauszek 2015 recipientJessica Pauszek

Bio and Research Proposal

Jess Pauszek earned her B.A. in English and French from Stetson University in DeLand, Florida. She then went on to earn her M.A. in English from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts. Currently, she is a 3rd year PhD Candidate in Composition and Rhetoric at Syracuse. Last year, she was awarded a Moynihan Grant and went to England to study the Federation of Worker Writers and Community Publishers (or the FWWCP), a network of working-class community writing and publishing groups that began in the 1970s and lasted until 2007. During this time, she met with FWWCP members and took part in discussions about archiving the decades of printed materials circulated by these groups--materials that include narratives about class, literacy and educational experiences, immigrant identity, and social change. This summer, Jess will continue to meet with these FWWCP members, attend writing workshops that have been created under an offshoot organization (theFED), conduct interviews with key FWWCP/FED members, work with scholars, archivists, and community members on developing the FWWCP archive at London Metropolitan University, as well as conduct her own archival research there. This will contribute to her dissertation project, which examines how working-class community groups deploy literacy in meaningful ways for personal, social, and political change. 

Lauren Hosek 2015 recipientLauren Hosek

Bio and Research Proposal

Lauren is a doctoral student in historical archaeology with a concentration in bioarchaeology. She received a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis and an M.A. from Syracuse University. She has participated in fieldwork on prehistoric and historic sites in the United States, as well as medieval sites in England, Scotland, and the Czech Republic. Her dissertation research examines how people’s lives (and bodies) articulate within large scale and long term historical processes such as the political unification and Christianization of early medieval Bohemia. To this end, she is conducting a bioarchaeological investigation of health, trauma, migration, and social status within a skeletal collection from the 10th century in what is now the Czech Republic. This project will use skeletal analysis, material culture, historical narratives, and comparative cases to address the interactions between human bodies and their broader social, cultural, and physical environments in an early medieval case.

Mark Dragoni 2015 recipientMark Dragoni

Bio and Research Proposal

Mark Dragoni received his BA in history from Maryville University in 2010 and his MA and MPhil in Early Modern European history from Syracuse University in 2013. His research interests include the social and intellectual history of the Atlantic World in the eighteenth century and particularly issues of transnational identity and belonging during the French Revolution. His dissertation examines Anglo-American commercial and political relationships in the years after the American Revolution. His work this summer will examine diplomatic and commercial records relating to trade with Americans in the Atlantic World at the British National Archives and the Liverpool Public Records Office. 


2014 Recipients

Jesse Hysell 2014 recipientJesse Hysell

Bio and Research Proposal

Jesse Hysell received his BA in history from Ohio Wesleyan University in 2008 and an MA in medieval European history from Western Michigan University in 2011. Prior to joining the doctoral program at Syracuse University's History Department, he worked as an English teacher in Hungary. His research interests include the social history of the Mediterranean in the Late Middle Ages and early modern period, and he is particularly fascinated with concepts of ethnic identity and the processes involved in constructing or transcending boundaries between cultural groups. His research explores hostility and tolerance in trading conflicts in the fifteenth-century Eastern Mediterranean, with a focus on diplomatic and commercial relations between Arab and southern European merchants. His work this summer will examine diplomatic and commercial relations between the Republic of Venice and the Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt in the fifteenth century.

Michael Newell 2014 recipientMichael Newell

Michael Newell is a fourth year Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Syracuse University. Michael previously studied at Ohio State University, where he received his BA in foreign relations and diplomacy, and University of Chicago, where he received his MA in international relations. At Syracuse, Michael studies international relations and comparative politics, with specific interests in security studies, constructivism, critical theory and qualitative methodology. Michael's dissertation seeks to identify the historical origins of contemporary counterterrorism policies. To this end, he will research developments in British and American security and law enforcement institutions in response to Irish Republican and anarchist political violence in the late 19th to early 20th Centuries. This historical focus will investigate not only the roots of contemporary responses to terrorism, but also the process by which state officials attach meaning and significance to security threats and rely on these meanings to guide policy responses. Last summer, he traveled to London, England, where he spent three weeks researching at the National Archives in Kew, England.

Jessica Pauszek 2014 recipientJessica Pauszek

Bio and Research Proposal

Her research examines the ability of self-generated community literacy projects to support working-class and working poor writers, with a particular emphasis on how the work of such groups also supports broader efforts for social and political change. This summer, she went to England to research the Federation of Worker Writers and Community Publishers (FWWCP/ FED), a network of working class writing groups that began in the 1970s. Since then, these groups have published thousands of texts centered on working class rights, immigrant experiences, and mental and physical hardships of adult learners. The goal with this project, as a whole, is to develop two print based archives (one to be housed in Syracuse University's Special Collections and another in the Trades Union Congress Library at London Metropolitan University) and a digital bridge that represents the valuable work of the FWWCP/FED.

Laura Giovanna Urist 2014 recipientLaura Giovanna Urist

Bio and Research Proposal

Giovanna Urist is a Ph.D. candidate in Early Modern European history at Syracuse University. She received her B.A. from Colorado College in 2007 and completed an undergraduate thesis on St. Catherine of Siena. Currently, Giovanna examines the Venetian church in the fifteenth century, and in particular the creation of the patriarchate of Venice and the first to hold that office, Lorenzo Giustiniani. Her dissertation is titled “Lorenzo Giustiniani and the Politics of Obedience: Church and State in Fifteenth-Century Venice,” which explores monastic reform in the Veneto, the episcopacy and the establishment patriarchate in Venice, and the fashioning of an early modern saint. In Summer 2014, Giovanna traveled to Venice to complete her dissertation research at the Archivio di Stato di Venezia, the Archivio Storico del Patriarcato di Venezia, the Museo Correr, and the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana.

Silas Webb 2014 recipientSilas Webb

Bio and Research Proposal

Silas Webb is a second year Ph.D. student at Syracuse University studying Modern South Asian and Transnational History. He has Bachelors of Arts in History and English from Lenoir-Rhyne University, in Hickory, North Carolina, and a Master of Arts in World History from the University of Manchester, in Manchester, United Kingdom. His research interests are rooted in the political organizations and social formations of the Punjabi diaspora in twentieth century Britain.

His dissertation, “Birmingham is no Detroit: Migration, Mobilization, and Memory in British Punjabi Politics, 1938-1984,” will trace the Indian Workers’ Association as it emerged at the intersection of Punjabi anti-colonialism, Indian communism, and the British labor movement. By engaging with these movements, the IWA articulated an abhorrence of racial injustice and economic exploitation. To tell this story, a series of interconnected questions must be considered. First, what was the role of memory in the politics of the IWA and how did it construct an historical narrative? Second, how did the IWA navigate ethnic, religious, and class politics to forge a British movement against racism and imperialism? Finally, what are the contours of the IWA's engagement with other movements against racism and imperialism what does that reveal about British Punjabi interaction within a transnational politics of Blackness? Together, the answers to these questions will expand understandings of British political incorporation, Punjabi diaspora history, transnational labor movement, and radical politics in the twentieth century.


2013 Recipients

Rebecca Brown 2013 recipientRebecca Brown

Bio and Research Proposal

Rebecca Brown is an undergraduate student in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University. She is studying International Relations with a concentration in international law and organizations. Last spring her research grant from the Moynihan Institute allowed her to travel to the Undergraduate Conference on the European Union in Claremont, California. At the conference she presented her research on the possibility of Britain withdrawing from the European Union. A large component of her research focused on how current British attitudes toward the EU reflect those of British citizens at other times in Britain's history with the EU. She evaluated how we can predict the various possible future actions of Britain in regards to the EU based on past events at similar points in history. At the Claremont conference she had the opportunity to consider wider EU problems as presented by her peers, as well as other concerns within Britain.

Research Report

The European Union is being tugged in different directions, with some of its member-states and citizens supporting greater integration at one end of the spectrum and euroskeptics tugging back against the progress of the EU. A sharp contrast has been created between the benefits of EU membership and the costs cited by the skeptics of integration. One country in particular that has long struggled with the balance between the positive and negative aspects of membership is Britain. Both domestically and in diplomacy with the other European states, British people have found cause for concern balanced against reasons to hold tight to EU membership. Britain has threatened to withdraw from the EU before, so what factors make the situation unique this time, and is the current movement indeed ripe for Britain to withdraw? Perhaps, the factors surrounding the latest announcements do indicate an era of change for both Britain and the EU.

Sherrod Marshall 2013 recipientSherrod Marshall

Bio and Research Proposal

Sherrod Marshall began his doctoral studies at Syracuse University in 2007 after completing his master’s degree in early-modern European history at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. In the process of his doctoral studies at SU, he has completed all of the necessary coursework hours for the doctorate, and he successfully passed his two foreign language exams within the first month of his program in 2007. While at Syracuse he has also completed two additional masters degrees: an MS in Education and an MPhil in history through the history department. He passed the three required comprehensive examinations for the doctorate in May 2010, and he successfully defended the dissertation proposal December 7, 2011. He plans to have written his dissertation in time to defend it no later than May 2015, which will require the completion of most of the archival research by the fall of 2013. Since the proposal defense, he has undertaken the in-depth archival research for the dissertation in Paris, France and Venice, Italy. Thanks to the Montgomery-Gruber Research Assistantship, he was able to live in Paris and Venice for the academic year 2012-2013 in which time he has been feverishly investigating the rich sources necessary for his project. His research focuses on the culture of diplomacy and the history of state formation at the international level with an eye to the crucial role political ideologies play in the success or failure of diplomatic exchange between states. He uses the example of Franco-Venetian diplomatic relations during the personal rule of Louis XIV as his major topic of research. He investigates the ways in which a selection of seven of Louis XIV’s ambassadors to the Republic of Venice deployed absolutist ideology to represent the king’s political and economic interests in Venice; to create the monarch’s reputation as a sovereign at the international level expanding his dynastic interests; and to contribute to the professionalization of the diplomat as a key figure in foreign policy realization and international exchange.

Research Report

The Moynihan CES Graduate Student Summer Research Grant allowed me to extend my year-long trip in Paris by an extra two months. I was able to continue working in the Bibliotheque Nationales de France for much longer than I thought I would have time to have done. I had spent most of my time photographing seventeenth-century diplomatic correspondence between French ambassadors to Venice and the court during the reign of Louis XIV (along the way acquiring over 20,000 photographs of documents, I must say), and I had thought I would have much less time in the BNF due to the time I had spent at the Foreign Affairs archives. My initial Moynihan application specified that I would be looking more in-depth at the correspondence of the Marquis de Gournay at the foreign affairs archives, and not only did the Moynihan grant allow me to finish that work, as I had requested, but the CES monies allowed me to return again to Paris in June and July after having been in Venice for a month and a half also. Much documentation relevant to the embassy of Pierre II de Bonsi, the Bishop of Beziers, the first ambassador that my dissertation focuses on and which the foreign affairs archives did not contain. The letters from Bonsi to Jean-Baptiste Colbert, spanning from 1662-1665, allowed me to encounter vital information about cultural and economic espionnage and acquisitions that Bonsi was involved in for the minister and the king aside from the official diplomatic correspondence. I was even able to find a complete list of the ambassador's retainers/household and a thorough account of how he acquired major artistic masterpieces for the king in Venice and its territories. I also found that Bonsi was instrumental in helping Colbert bribe Venetian glass and crystal artists to go to France and teach their secret arts to French craftsmen, much to the Venetians' anger and financial loss. French mirror makers became a major threat to those in Venice as a result of this interaction - the Hall of Mirrors at Versailles becoming the chief advertisement for French glass and mirror production. This commercial coup was all a result of Bonsi's work in Venice of which little has been written on or analyzed to comment on this major facet of Franco-Venetian diplomacy and French commercial advancement during the reign of Louis XIV. These issues are critical in understanding the secret nature of diplomatic exchange between these two geo-political neighbors and the ways that an ambassador was to construct the reputation and image of power for the monarch not only officially but also through subterfuge. Moynihan funds made this major contribution to my project analyzing political and cultural ideologies and their influence on diplomatic negotiation and its success possible. I sincerely appreciated these funds and the Moynihan Institute’s generosity in offering them and promoting my contribution to my field. Through such generous assistance and attention to scholarship, the Moynihan Institute becomes, in its way, a contributing partner to the many disciplines it so willingly advances.

Dan Stratila 2013 recipientDan Stratila

Bio and Research Proposal

Dan Stratila is an MA candidate at the Maxwell School and the Hertie School of Governance. After completing a multiple degree program in Romania and Germany, Dan came to Syracuse in 2011 as part of the Atlantis dual-degree program. With regard to the impact shale gas had had in the US context, the research aims to answer the question if a similar development is reproducible in Europe, particularly Central Eastern Europe, being highly dependent on non-EU third party gas imports. Since the debate about and around shale gas exploitation is highly polarized, finding a non-emotional position in the debate is harder than it sounds. Thus, if you are not taking a downright position against the technology, discussion peers automatically assume you are strongly in favor of it (and the other way around). The research utilizes a supply/demand index (SDI) developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) in order to measure potential regional advantages in numerical terms, removing any interest driven distortions.

Research Report

The research is designed as a policy paper dealing with five Central Eastern European EU states with the most likely conditions to exploit shale gas: Bulgaria, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, and Romania. The first part locates shale gas within a technological and economical matrix denoting different types of hydrocarbon resources. Secondly, energy policy and the logic governing its strategic planning is presented. Particularly important is separating the EU level from the nation state level when analyzing policy. Since energy policy is by and large made in national capitals, while the EU sets a policy-making ceiling and allows subsidies of certain technologies, the research formulates national policy options. The third part complements the economic and technological matrix with a third axis, the energy policy axis. National energy data projections for 2030 are fed into the SDI in order to gauge shifts in energy security along three shale gas production scenarios. National energy strategies as well as relevant political forces within the national policy-making arena were explored through interviews and media sources. Finally, the research concludes that only the Lithuanian case shows significant improvement in the SDI and recommends shale gas exploitation. Further, due to Poland´s heavy reliance on emission intensive lignite an exception is made from merely using the SDI as means of evaluation and shale gas is recommended as a viable Polish energy source as well. 


2012 Recipients

Robert Clines 2012 recipientRobert Clines

Bio and Research Proposal

Robert Clines is a doctoral candidate in the Department of History. After completing a BA at John Carroll University and an MA at Miami University, Rob came to Syracuse in 2009. His dissertation, ‘Provincializing Jesuits: Confessional Politics and the Jesuit Experience in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire,’ investigates the cultural experience of Jesuit missionaries in the Ottoman Empire between 1550 and 1650. For this project, Rob was recently awarded a J. William Fulbright U.S. Student Scholarship to spend the 2012-2013 academic year in Italy. His summer project, for which he was awarded a Center for European Studies Student Summer Research Grant, is entitled ‘The Jesuit Experience in Ottoman Aleppo, 1630-1645.’ Rob will spend the summer in Rome, Italy, working in the Archivum Romanum Societatis Iesu, the central archive of the Society of Jesus, to investigate the Jesuit residence established under Father General Mutio Vitelleschi as an integral part of the urban fabric of early modern Aleppo.

Research Report

In his two-month stay in Rome, he has successfully worked in the Jesuit Archive and continued work on his dissertation. He has conducted further research on approximately 200 pages of manuscripts pertaining to the Jesuit residence in Aleppo, Syria. This residence was from 1630 to 1645. He is almost finished researching this mission, which will become part of the final chapter of the dissertation, tentatively entitled “Mutio Vitelleschi and the Christian Orient, 1615-1645.” This chapter will explore how Vitelleschi, the father general of the Jesuits, dealt with increasing pressures to missionize in the Middle East yet faced heightened political tensions from the Ottomans as well. The goal of this short summer project, to explore how the Jesuits dealt with life in the city of Aleppo, illuminated important aspects of the Aleppo residence, including how they financed the residence, their activities with instructing Greeks and Arabs in Latin, and their efforts to convert local Christian populations to Catholicism. While their efforts were largely unsuccessful, nonetheless the missionary reports reflect many frustrations, reflections, and concerns with how to conduct the mission as well as evaluations of the Christians they worked with. They also discussed their fellow Europeans, as well as the Muslims and Jews with whom they shared Aleppo.

Charles Goldberg 2012 recipientCharles Goldberg

Bio and Research Proposal

Charles Goldberg is entering his third year as a graduate student in the History Department. He studies political culture and citizenship in ancient Rome and is in the beginning stages of research for his dissertation, which will focus on changing conceptions of masculinity from the Roman Republic to the Early Roman Empire. This May, the Center for European Studies Student Summer Research Grant will allow him to travel to Rome to study funerary inscriptions of the Middle and Late Roman Republic. He is hopeful that these sources will allow him to shed light on the intersections of elite and non-elite culture in a way not afforded by the traditional emphasis on aristocratic literary works.

Research Report

After his research this past May, study of the funerary inscriptions in the tomb of the Scipios, an aristocratic family during the Roman Republic, has allowed him key insights for his project. Some of the inscriptions provide a long summary of the many political honors won by individual members of the family. While these are no-doubt fascinating, the commemorative inscription of a less successful member of the family, Publius Cornelius Scipio, the sickly son of the immensely successful Scipio Africanus, is particularly interesting though overlooked. It is noted that had Publius lived longer he surely would have equaled and surpassed the achievements of his ancestors. Most interestingly, the inscription notes that Publius was flamen dialis, a priest with high cultural honors but severe political limitations. After further research on other holders of this priesthood, Goldberg now postulates that elite families viewed it as a respectable position for family members who otherwise would have been political failures; in other words, it was a position for the family’s black sheep. While scholars of political competition in ancient Rome typically emphasize the struggle for the highest honors, Goldberg believes that study of men like Publius is just as valuable, as their careers reveal that those without political prospects could still play a part in the strategy of elite Roman families for gaining prestige.

Ayse Ozcan 2012 recipientAyse Ozcan

Bio and Research Proposal

Ayse Ozcan is a PhD student at the Anthropology Department of Syracuse University. She holds an MA degree in English Literature. Her areas of interest include Muslims in Europe, identity formations, migration, and discourse analysis. This summer, she plans to conduct her preliminary research in France as a continuation of her project. She intends to visit some of the mosque communities of North African origins in the Paris suburbs. Their partner churches will also be her research sites as part of their interfaith dialogue project. She will refresh her previous contacts within the mosques, and churches as well as with the local authorities. Ayse will pay particular attention to the multicultural, secular, inter/religious and cultural discourses that are circulated among the mosque congregants. She will also observe their discursive practices within the mosque space.

Research Report

The eight-week preliminary fieldwork in Paris allowed her to conduct further participant observation and interviews at the two North African mosques that are the focus of this research. Religious organizations such as mosques have been a driving force behind identity politics of European Muslims in the past thirty years. As a result, mosques have become sites where religion, construed and imagined as a private “invisible” affair; and state-secularism, assigned to the “visible” public domain, are negotiated on a daily basis. This project will thus explore the construction of new citizen-regimes in the unique space of mosques, which by becoming both public and private, allows for the formation of modern Muslim citizen-subjects in France. This dissertation research connects the two ideas of space and religion by investigating on the one hand the politics of place-making, and on the other hand the negotiation of religion and secularization within the public sphere. Ozcan argues that understanding how young Muslims maintain such a two-fold identity as different from the elderly cannot be fully captured without understanding their place-making mechanism. She argues this because young French Muslims have been claiming and negotiating their religious particularities with a secular life through spatial belongings and practices in Islamic institutions at an increasing degree.