Courses on East Asia 

Undergraduate:

Undergraduate Courses on East Asia
Course Number   Course Description and Credit

ECN 362

PSC 462

Globalization Development and Environment

3 credits

Offered only in London. Differing perspectives on changing global economy and nature of modern state. Key ideas regarding development through experiences of developing countries in Asia and Africa.

ECN 363

Economic Development of China 
3 credits

Examines the economic development of China since 1949, including impact of such policies as the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, Deng’s Open Door commitment, and current strategies. *Offered only in Hong Kong*

PREREQ: ECN 101 & 102 OR ECN 203

ETS 235

Classics of World Literature I

3 credits
Readings from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, India, Greece, Israel, Rome, and Arabia investigate notions of literary merit, and their social, religious, and political ramifications in relations to historical context (ca. 2500 BCE-1000 CE).

ETS 236     Classics of World Literature II 
     3 credits

Readings from great women writers of Japan and from Dante, Cervantes, and Shakespeare; and from world oral and written traditions that investigate notions of literary merit and their ramifications in historical context (ca. 1000 CE-present).

HOA 392      The Arts of China 
     3 credits

A chronological survey of the arts and visual culture of China. Major works of art and the material culture that surrounded them, from the Neolithic era to the present.

HOA491

ART 411

History of Japanese Design: Studies in Material Culture 
3 credits 

Survey of design in Japan (pre-historical times to present), and influence of Japanese design on the West.  Examines works in different media and situates these within a historical and cultural context. 

PREREQ: ART 113

HST 320

Traditional China 

3 credits

Political, economic, social and cultural history before 1650. Emphasis on sources of change and stability. Main themes: Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism; invasion and rebellion: conquest and consolidation.

HST 321

Modern China 
3 credits

Political, economic, social and cultural history since 1650. Main themes: Social change in city and countryside, impact of Western nations, enduring legacies of traditional China.

HST 393  

East Asia and the Socialist Experience
3 credits

Examines the adoption of socialism in East Asia. Historical account of how socialist China, Mongolia, North Korea and Vietnam arose, developed, “failed” and responded to globalization in the 20th century. 

HST 395  

Modern Japan

3 credits

Examines Japanese society from early-modern times (1600-1868) through modern (1868-1945) and postwar Japan (1945-today). Topics include: urbanization, mass culture and nationalism, popular protest, imperialism and empire, gender, war and occupation and globalization.

HST 397

Modern Korea

3 credits 

Examines political, economic and social history from 1860 until today. Topics include: colonialism, modernity, division, the Korean War, nation-building, nationalism, democratization, North Korean society, inter-Korean affairs, nuclear issues, Korean Diaspora and “Korea Wave.”

HST 413  

China Encounters the West: Qing Dynasty to Early Republic  
3 credits

This course surveys the political, social, and cultural history of Qing China, using the great city of Beijing, the Qing capital, as its backdrop. *Offered only in Beijing*

HST 443

ANT 403

Culture, Confucianism and Chinese Modernity 

3 credits

Contemporary China from historical and cultural perspectives. Exploration of political and ideological conflicts between China and the West. Patterns of Chinese culture. Impact of Confucianism on Chinese society and its influence outside of China. *Offered only in Beijing*

HST 444

INB 444

IRP 444

Culture, Business and Political Economics in East Asia
3 credits

Examines the historical and contemporary forces that shape the cultural, social and economic institutions in East Asia and how these institutions affect one another. *Offered only in Hong Kong*

HUM 304

The Other China: Ethnic Minorities and Development

2 credits

Examination of the impact of globalization and development on China’s culturally diverse peoples, natural environment and animal habitats through onsite visits to tribal villages, water projects and nature preserves in Yunnan and Sichuan provinces in Southwest China. *Offered only in Beijing*

IRP 431

Environment and Development in China 
3 credits

Addresses challenges in the environment and development arena in contemporary China, with analysis of conflict and resolution from multiple public policy perspectives. *Offered only in Beijing*

PAI 515

PSC 431

China in Transition 
3 credits 

Seminar examines the unprecedented, multi-faceted transitional changes occurring in China since the late 1970s. Impact of reforms on China’s external relations.*Offered only in Beijing*

PSC 335

Politics of East Asia

3 credits

Domestic and international politics of East Asia broadly defined. Political development and structure of major countries: Japan, Korea, and China. Politics of public policy, international, and transnational relations in the region.

PSC 425

Hong Kong in the World Political Economy

3 credits

Role of Hong Kong in world political economy since creation by British after Opium Wars, to position as leading export economy and its retrocession to China in 1997. *Offered only in Hong Kong*

PSC 442  

Democratization in East Asia
3 credits

Examines the efforts at democratization in East Asia, including such early efforts as the May Fourth Movement in China (1920s-1930s) and the Taisho Democracy in Japan(1920s). Comparisons are made with current situations in Taiwan, Hong Kong and South Korea. *Offered only in Hong Kong.*

REL 186

SAS 186

Buddhism

3 credits

Buddhism as a world religion: its origin in India, its spread to other parts of Asia, and consequent changes in doctrine and practice through the ages

REL 385 

Religion in Chinese Society
3 credits

Surveys the diversity of religious practice in mainland China and Taiwan focusing on the lived experiences of ordinary adherents both within institutionalized religions and through localized folk beliefs and practices.

SOC 447

Social Change and Conflict in Modern China  

3 credits

Social and economic transformations in China in terms of social classes, cultural patterns, urban change, family patterns, ethnic tensions, and struggles over political rights. Questions of Taiwan and Tibet. How China’s development affects the U.S.


Graduate:

Graduate courses on East Asia
Course Number   Course Description and Credit

PSC 700

US & China Contested World Order 
3 credits 

The United States and China boast the world’s two largest economies and each possesses enormous military might. The growing parity in terms of power between these two behemoths is largely the result of China’s dramatic rise over the past two decades. The shifting global balance of power has raised speculation among scholars and pundits alike that China may seek to use its growing influence to “revise” the status quo world order that reflects American interests and values. In this course, we will confront this speculation head on by employing theory and engaging with empirical analyses drawn from international relations scholarship. At first, we will wrestle with the concept of “international order” in the abstract. If the international system is anarchic, how can we speak of order in world politics? To answer this question, we will engage with classic IR texts as well as modern treatments of the topic. Following this, we will segue into the current debate over U.S., China and the current and future state of world order. As we dive into this topic, we will consider an array of topics and seek answers to a range of important questions. To what extent is American hegemony is threatened by an insurgent China? What is the nature and current state of the so-called “liberal” American order? What does China’s rise mean for order and security in East Asia? How might China’s rise affect the global economic order and the Bretton Woods institutions?

            
PSC 782   

Politics of China 
3 credits
Political development, political institutions, and political economy of China and Chinese foreign relations, emphasizing the reform era. 

PSC 784

Comparative Social Movements 

3 credits

Development of the national social movement in Europe, culture and movements, organizations, collective identity, religion, movements and state institutions, comparative political contexts for movements, and others, using cases from Europe, the United States, Asia, and elsewhere.

PSC 785

Comparative Civil-Military Relations
3 credits 

Theory and practice of civil-military relations. The military’s role in the modern state and in modern society. Broad geographic coverage, including the United States, Europe, Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. 

LAW 883 

 Central Challenges in National Security Law and Policy
3 credits
Using a series of case study modules that jump off the front page, the course examines critically the hardest U.S. national security law and policy challenges of the decades ahead. The case studies range from decisions to intervene and what laws apply if we do intervene in humanitarian crises, insurrections, or civil wars, and what laws should govern when we are involved; dealing with the Arab Spring; dealing with Iran and North Korea related to nuclear weapons; anticipating and controlling new technologies in warfare and surveillance; managing civil/military relations in protecting the homeland; countering the cyber threats to our infrastructure and cyber attacks waged by nation states, such as China and Russia; managing public health as a national security issue; resource depletion and global warming as a national security issue. Students will learn to integrate legal and policy analyses, and will gain lessons in how policy is made and implemented with significant legal guidance. Students will present analyses of case studies to the class, and will write briefing memoranda concerning some of the case study modules.

Language Courses:

CHINESE

       
Chinese language courses
Course Number   Course Description and Credit

CHI 102

Chinese II

4 Credits- spring semester only

Continuing proficiency based course which develops communicative speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese.

PREREQ: CHI 101

CHI 201    

Chinese III

4 Credits - fall semester only
Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese. 
PREREQ: CHI 102

       

CHI 202

   

Chinese IV

4 Credits - spring semester only
Continuing proficiency-based course which further refines and expands linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Incorporates reading, discussing, and analyzing texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in Chinese 
PREREQ: CHI 201

       

CHI 300

   

Chinese for Heritage Speakers 

4 Credits - fall and spring semesters 
This course is for students that are comfortable with Chinese in speaking and listening, but have little background in writing and reading, and who also want a more formal and complete knowledge of China. This course is accordingly, taught mostly in Chinese, and covers the written language, grammar, and literature; as well as Chinese culture and customs. Need permission from Instructor.

       

CHI 301 

   

Chinese V

3 Credits- fall semester only
Fifth in the sequence of continuing proficiency based courses  that refine and expand previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese.
PREREQ: CHI 202

CHI 302     

Chinese V 

3 Credits- spring semester only 
Sixth in the sequence of continuing proficiency based courses that refine and expand previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese.
PREREQ: CHI 301

JAPANESE 

Japanese language courses
Course Number   Course Description and Credit

JPS 101    

Japanese I

4 Credits - Offered every year
Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in JPS 101 after successfully completing JPS102, JPS 201, or JPS 202 or higher

JPS 102

 

Japanese II

4 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. Students cannot enroll in JPS 102 after successfully completing JPS 201, JPS 202 or higher.
PREREQ: JPS 101

JPS 201

Japanese III

4 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. Students cannot enroll in JPS 201 after successfully completing JPS 202 or higher. 
PREREQ: JPS 102

JPS 202

Japanese IV

4 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which further refines and expands linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Incorporates reading, discussing, and analyzing texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in Japanese. Students cannot enroll in JPS 202 after successfully completing a course higher than JPS 202. 
PREREQ: JPS 201

JPS 301

Japanese V

3 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese 
PREREQ: JPS 202

JPS 302

Japanese VI

3 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. 
PREREQ: JPS 301

JPS 620

Language Training in Preparation for Research Using Japanese

3 Credits
Language training to prepare students to conduct research in areas that require knowledge of Japanese. 
Repeatable 3 time(s), 12 credits maximum


KOREAN

Korean language courses
Course Number   Course Description and Credit
KOR 101

Korean I

4 Credits - Offered every year
Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Korean. 

KOR 102

Korean II

4 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 102 after successfully completing KOR 201, KOR 202 or higher.
PREREQ: KOR 101

KOR 201

Korean III

4 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 201 after successfully completing KOR 202 or higher. 
PREREQ: KOR 102

KOR 202

Korean IV

4 Credits - Offered every year
Continuing proficiency-based course which further refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Incorporates reading, discussing, and analyzing texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Activities conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 202 after successfully completing a course higher than KOR 202. 
PREREQ: KOR 201

KOR 620

Language Training in Preparation for Research in Korean

3 Credits - Offered each semester
Language instruction to prepare students to conduct research in areas that require knowledge of Korean. Permission of instructor. 
Repeatable 3 time(s), 12 credits maximum

 

For more courses and information on courses offered visit Course Catalog 
For more information on language courses please consult The College of Arts & Sciences Webpage