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TNGO Updates

Recent happenings from the TNGO Initiative

Current Program Fellow and Secretary General of the World YWCA Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda to visit local YWCA in North Tonawanda, NY

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Visiting Program Fellow for the Transnational NGO Initiative and Secretary General of the World YWCA, Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda, will be taking a trip to North Tonawanda, NY to visit a local YWCA affiliate. She will be attending a raffle fundraiser in support of their work against domestic violence.


 

Click here to read the article listed in Tonawanda News. 

A Career Talk with Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda, Tuesday April 3, 4:00 - 5:00 pm

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The Transnational NGO Student Group is proud to present:

 

 Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda

Secretary General, World Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA)

 

A Career Talk

 


Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda became General Secretary of World YWCA in 2007. YWCA, which has existed for 158 years, is a global network of women and young women leading social and economic change in 125 countries, reaching 25 million women and girls. Its work is inspired by Christian principles and a commitment to women’s full and equal participation in society. It is a volunteer membership movement, inclusive of women from many faiths, backgrounds, and cultures and advocates for peace, justice, human rights, and care of the environment. The World YWCA develops women’s leadership to find local solutions to global inequalities women face.


 

Ms. Gumbonzvanda is a trained human rights lawyer with extensive experience in conflict resolution and mediation. She has been working on women and children’s human rights issues, with a special focus on crisis countries, for 25 years. Within the women’s movement, her focus is on violence against women, peace with justice, property rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and HIV and AIDS. Ms. Gumbonzvanda spent over 10 years with the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) in Eastern and Horn Africa, covering 13 countries. Before that she was a human rights officer with UNICEF in Liberia and Zimbabwe.


 

April 3, 2012

4:00 - 5:00 pm

341 Eggers Hall

 

 

Talk by Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda, Inter-generational, Shared, And Transformative Leadership: Advancing Women’s Rights, Wednesday April 4, 12:30-2:00

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The Transnational NGO Student Group is proud to present:

 

 Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda

Secretary General, World YWCA

 

Inter-generational, Shared, And Transformative Leadership: Advancing Women’s Rights

 

 

The global agenda for development, peace, and equality is grounded on notions of equality of voice, opportunities, and access for citizens in their diversity. Leadership plays a critical role as a driver for change. There is urgency, especially in transnational NGOs, to adopt clearer approaches for nurturing, fostering, and sustaining inter-generational leadership. Many organizations struggle with practical ways for facilitating meaningful participation of young people as co-leaders in the development agenda.

 

Ms. Gumbonzvanda will discuss the World YWCA's agenda for promoting intergenerational leadership and investing in leadership of young women. For a global movement and organization that has existed for 158 years and has a presence in 125 countries, with an outreach to 25 million women and girls; such clarity of approach on shared and transformative leadership is critical. She will focus on inter-generational leadership within the goal of advancing women's rights.



Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda is a trained human rights lawyer with extensive experience in conflict resolution and mediation. She has been working on women and children’s human rights issues, with a special focus on crisis countries, for 25 years. Within the women’s movement, her focus is on violence against women, peace with justice, property rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights, and HIV and AIDS. Ms. Gumbonzvanda spent over 10 years with the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) in Eastern and Horn Africa, covering 13 countries. Before that she was a human rights officer with UNICEF in Liberia and Zimbabwe. In 2007, Ms. Gumbonzvanda became General Secretary of World YWCA.

 


Lunch will be served


April 4, 2012

12:30 - 2:00 pm

341 Eggers Hall

Problems and Solutions of Starting an NGO event, Wednesday, April 4, 5:30-7:30

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This event will provide a space for mutual exchange among students who share an interest in starting an NGO or are running a start-up NGO. The goal is to provide a learning environment for students to discuss and share their experiences on challenges, solutions, and best practices. 


 

 

 Program on Latin America and the Caribbean 

Co-sponsored by the Transnational NGO Initiative 

Presents: 

 

Problems and Solutions of Starting an NGO  

How do you get from ideas to implementation? Why would you start an NGO rather than joining one? How do you get donors when you have nothing to raise money for (no projects yet)? What are some of the challenges after you start the organization (or of maintaining it)?  


 

Allyson Goldsmith is the founder and Executive Director of ELEVEate, an organization which helps girls obtain an education in Senegal, and is also currently completing a dual masters in Public Administration and International Relations at the Maxwell School. 

Rose Marie Cromwell is a co-founder and co-director of Cambio Creativo, a grassroots organization facilitating educational workshops in Coco Solo, Panama, and is currently completing her MFA in Art Photography at Syracuse University. 

Roman Yavich is a co-founder of Comunidad Connect, a community development non-profit in Nicaragua, and a current graduate student at SUNY ESF. 

Nicolas Hernandez is co-founder and former director (4 years) of Ocasa, an NGO that works with youth promoting transparency and citizen participation in Colombia. 


 

All are welcome, but if possible please rsvp to Flavia Rey de Castro at freydeca@syr.edu to help us estimate our food order. 


 


 

April 4, 2012  

5:30 – 7:30 pm  

220 Eggers Hall  

  

 

 

TNGO Initiative facilitates learning on organizational change among TNGOs

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Tosca Bruno-van Vijfeijken recently facilitated a learning day on organizational change among seven large TNGOs with a basis in the UK. The purpose was to compare cross-organizational lessons on how to lead and manage change; what are the drivers for such change; how to design large scale organizational change processes; implementation challenges encountered and lessons learned. The TNGOs involved are: Oxfam International, Save the Children, CARE International, Islamic Relief, a consortium of Irish NGOs including Trocaire and CAFOD, ActionAid International and Amnestry International.


The INGOs involved in this learning day are currently considering how to follow up with a more large scale learning process, which may result in the decision to build a repository of in-house documents on organizational change, facilitating bilateral problem solving around specific change related issues, and the organization of regular cross-organizational learning events. The TNGO Initiative stands ready to stay engaged in this process as needed and fulfill a facilitating role. The documentation resulting from this process will allow Maxwell to engage in applied research on this important topic, will contribute to the development of teaching materials, and further round out the TNGO Initiative's practitioner engagement work.


The work will also complement the efforts by Steve Lux, Executive Education Director and Tosca to write a teaching case on the organizational transformation process that Save the Children is currently undergoing -- on the request of the NGO concerned.


For more information, see here.

Kony 2012: what solutions do its critics propose?

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Using social media, Invisible Children (IC) has raised global awareness about Joseph Kony, the Lord’s Resistance Army, and their atrocities committed across Eastern and Central Africa since 1986 (for my own extended take, see here and here). In only a few days, close to 40 million have watched a 28 minute film which calls on viewers to pressure the U.S. government to continue its military engagement and ensure the removal of Kony. The White House has congratulated the film makers. Critics of this most recent campaign against Kony have challenged the motives of the organization behind the campaign and also questioned the goals advanced by IC. Some of these criticisms miss the point entirely, while others should lead to a broader public debate that addresses the root causes of this conflict.

 

Many of the critics have made the point that Invisible Children in 2011 only spent 32% of its budget of $8.6m on direct services. This type of criticism misses the point on two counts. First, as an advocacy group, Invisible Children is not supposed to spend most of its income on service, but on advocacy. The last few days have shown that it has done that quite effectively, at least in terms of reaching millions. Which raises a second point: What primarily matters are outcomes and impact, not how much money the organization spends on activities relative to fundraising or administration. Charity watchdogs typically only look at efficiency measures, telling donors nothing about what actual impact an advocacy group has.

 

This then raises the final point: Is Invisible Children actually contributing to improving the situation in a sustainable way? Critics of the campaign have made some important points: 1. the atrocities have taken place many years ago; 2. it fails to highlight atrocities committed by the Ugandan army; 3. it fails to address the root causes of violence found in poverty and ethnic discrimination; 4. it portrays Africa yet again as a ‘dark continent‘ in need of our help (which typically only makes things worse); 5. it fails to reflect local views from the region; and 6. it mobilizes thousands of naive and uninformed people to sooth their guilt with money while creating dangerous and harmful outcomes. As one can see across the internet, the debate about these criticisms (a good summary at the BBC) has become more than ‘spirited’ and in many cases openly hostile (IC's response to its critics).

 

IC has, once again, raised awareness about Joseph Kony and the LRA. Yes, their ‘solutions’ may be questionable and some may even be dangerous, but the argument cannot simply be that things are ‘complex’ and that this won’t work. Those who criticize IC and claim to be experts need to formulate their alternatives and be willing to engage in the public debate in a proactive manner. To just say ‘no‘ won’t do it in addressing the atrocities committed by Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army. In the age of social media, 'bad' ideas can easily turn into counterproductive campaigns and even worse policies.

 

The presentation of David Harvey, CEO of ProLiteracy, is now available online.

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On March 1, 2012, David Harvey, President and CEO of ProLiteracy,the largest NGO advancing adult literacy, gave a talk at The Maxwell School through the TNGO Initiative. In the talk, titled "Leading Out of Crisis: Strategies to Reposition an International NGO for Success", Mr. Harvey discussed the restructuring and turnaround of ProLiteracy to address the significant financial, operational, and strategic challenges that threatened the organization.


 
You can see his presentation here