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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Population Studies

Engelhardt cited in Bloomberg article on missed housing payments

February 10, 2021
Fewer people surveyed at the end of last year said they feared losing their homes, which may be a result of government aid so far, says Gary Engelhardt, professor of economics. Read more in the Bloomberg article, "More Than 5% of Americans Didn’t Pay Rent, Mortgage in December." 

Barkun cited in Mere Orthodoxy article on insurgency in America

January 28, 2021
Professor Emeritus Michael Barkun's research on extremism and conspiracy theories was cited in the Mere Orthodoxy article, "A Homegrown Christian Insurgency."

Landes comments on vaccine prioritization for people with IDD in Washington Post

January 13, 2021
Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology, says if states had a greater focus on the pandemic’s impact on the disabled," vaccination prioritization would be much clearer. You would have the evidence to tell you what needs to be done."

Banks discusses the National Guard monitoring protests with NBC News

January 11, 2021
The use of National Guard units in June during the nationwide demonstrations following George Floyd’s death was "fundamentally exceptional and different from the way civilians and the military have ordinarily worked together," says Professor Emeritus William Banks.

Banks sums up 2020 in China Daily article

January 6, 2021
Professor Emeritus William C. Banks sums up 2020 in three phrases: COVID-19, racial justice and democracy threatened.

Radcliffe quoted in Deseret News article on COVID-19 double standards

January 4, 2021
For people struggling to stay motivated to continue social distancing and wearing masks, cases where public officials ignore the very rules they are imposing on others can be frustrating. In the field of behavioral ethics, this phenomenon is called "ethical fading," says Dana Radcliffe, adjunct professor of public administration and international affairs. The term describes the way people deceive themselves to hide the wrongness of their choices. But, officials should be held to a higher standard, he says, especially when public health is on the line. "People who have considerable power or ability to influence others have a greater obligation to make sure that their actions match their words—because their words and actions can affect the behavior and welfare of others," says Radcliffe. Read more in the Deseret News article, "7 times public officials had double standards on COVID-19." 

WP 182 Health, Medical Innovation and Disability Insurance

August 31, 2015
This study examines the effect of health on SSDI outcomes. The effect is identified by a new antiretroviral therapy to treat the human immunodeficiency virus. 

The Truths Behind the Myth of Harriet Tubman

June 23, 2008
Harriet Tubman is an American heroine, but her life story is shrouded in myth and exaggeration. Thanks to the work of Maxwell faculty members and students, the genuine contributions of Tubman’s life are coming to light.

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