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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Wellbeing

Silverstein Comments on Multigenerational Living in New York Times Article

March 31, 2022

Merril Silverstein, Marjorie Cantor Endowed Professor in Aging, was quoted in the New York Times article, "The Nuclear Family Is No Longer the Norm. Good."

Harrington Meyer quoted in NY Times piece on vacationing with grandparents

July 19, 2021
Madonna Harrington Meyer, university professor of sociology and author of "Grandmothers at Work," is included in the New York Times article, "How to Have a Fun, Multigenerational Family Vacation." 

Heflin featured in The Well article on material hardship, COVID-19

April 28, 2021
A recent Urban Institute survey found that compared with adults whose family employment was unaffected by the pandemic, families who lost jobs during the pandemic were twice as likely to report food insecurity, and nearly three times as likely to report problems paying utility bills, and nearly four times as likely to report problems paying rent or mortgage.

Landes speaks to PBS about COVID-19 vaccines for people with IDD

April 1, 2021
"It's not been surprising, on one hand, that states have not prioritized this group, because that's historically been the case," says Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology. "It's been disappointing, because the evidence was there pre-pandemic and the evidence is there now that this group is at higher risk." 

Sultana talks to MIT Technology Review about what progress means

February 25, 2021
Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment, was interviewed for the MIT Technology Review article, "What does progress mean to you?"

Robinson weighs in on Price Chopper, Tops merger in LocalSYR interview

February 15, 2021

"My biggest concern is food access in rural communities and urban communities alike," says Jonnell Robinson, associate professor of geography and the environment and director of the Community Geography program, adding, "and making sure that folks don't have to travel too far to get to a grocery store."

Radcliffe quoted in Deseret News article on COVID-19 double standards

January 4, 2021
For people struggling to stay motivated to continue social distancing and wearing masks, cases where public officials ignore the very rules they are imposing on others can be frustrating. In the field of behavioral ethics, this phenomenon is called "ethical fading," says Dana Radcliffe, adjunct professor of public administration and international affairs. The term describes the way people deceive themselves to hide the wrongness of their choices. But, officials should be held to a higher standard, he says, especially when public health is on the line. "People who have considerable power or ability to influence others have a greater obligation to make sure that their actions match their words—because their words and actions can affect the behavior and welfare of others," says Radcliffe. Read more in the Deseret News article, "7 times public officials had double standards on COVID-19." 

Heflin study on material hardship, perceived stress and health in early adulthood published in AE

September 16, 2020
The authors examined the associations between material hardship and health outcomes in early adulthood and how they are mediated by perceived stress.

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