Rob Alexander

Rob Alexander

Assistant Professor of Political Science at James Madison University.


Rob Alexander is a PARCC alumni and former Director of the Conflict Management Center (CMC).  He is the author of three award winning cases and simulations of the E-PARCC annual competition. "Collaborative Strategy for Organizational Survival " a case which received an honorable mention in 2007.  In 2009 his simulation, “Addressing ALCA: An Exercise in Designing and Facilitating Stakeholder Processes,” received the first place award and in the 2015 competition he was co-author of the simulation "Fracked: Uncertainties in Negotiated Rule Making." 

Dr. Alexander holds a B.S. in Geology from Duke University, after which he attended Indiana University-Bloomington and earned dual Masters degrees in Public Administration and Environmental Science. After 15 years working as an environmental educator and nonprofit executive, he attended the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and received a Ph.D. in Public Administration. 

Currently, Dr. Alexander is an assistant professor of political science at James Madison University, where he teaches courses on collaborative public management, environmental and natural resource policy, environmental conflict management, organizational theory, and research design and implementation. His current research is focused on sustainability policy, brownfield remediation, and the challenges and opportunities encountered by public, private, nonprofit, and civil society organizations as they address issues of sustainability.

Quote:
“One of the greatest strengths of doctoral study at the Maxwell School that continues to impact my work today was the degree of interaction and integration with doctoral student colleagues across the social sciences and humanities.  My placement in the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC) and exposure to the theoretical lenses applied by PARCC scholars in sociology, anthropology, history, and political science greatly influenced my ability to approach research from an informed, interdisciplinary perspective.”