Undergraduate Study

Summer 2020 Courses

Maymester (May 11th-22nd)

PSC 300 m501 Free Speech Theory and Law Class

Instructor: Nathan Carrington
Class #: 71752
Offered: Online
Prerequisites: None

Course Description 
Can you falsely shout "FIRE!" in a crowded theater or kneel during the national anthem to protest police brutality? Is "hate speech” protected by the First Amendment? Is Twitter allowed to ban it? Can a city government stop a "Straight Pride Parade” from taking place? This course will address these questions and more while drawing attention to the legal complexity of free expression disputes. In doing so, students will be exposed to common justifications for free and robust speech in a society and how the courts have addressed the topic both in the present day and historically. As such, students will walk away from the class with a firm understanding of the legal doctrine and theory necessary to analyze the range of free speech disputes that emerge on a near-daily basis in today’s society.

PSC 344 m500 / MES 344 m501 Politics of the Middle East

Instructor: Sefa Secen
Class #: 72192
Offered: Online
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description 
This course provides an overview of the politics of the contemporary Middle East. It is divided into four modules. In the first, we examine the political history of the region, specifically the Ottoman, Colonial, and Cold War periods. We then explore the nation-building processes of Turkey, Egypt, Iran, Israel, and Saudi Arabia by focusing on the competing forces such as nationalism, secularism, and religion. In the third module, we look at the ongoing political conflicts in the region including but not limited to the Israel-Palestinian Conflict, the Syrian Civil War, and the Yemeni Civil War. Finally, we discuss how a variety of factors including foreign interventions, authoritarianism, and natural resources have shaped politics in the Middle East. We also address the consequences of the 2011 Arab Spring, the issues of gender, and the influence of superpowers over the region.


Session I (May 18th-June 25th)

PSC 202 m001 Intro to Political Analysis

Instructor: Hanna Noh
Class #: 70353
Offered: Online
Prerequisites: None

Course Description 
Not everyone likes vegetables. But vegetables are essential to a healthy diet. This method course is a vegetable of political science: This course introduces the basic skills for political science and international relations majors to read and comprehend political science research and ultimately learn how to conduct and present one’s own research. Political science research will sound foreign without learning the concepts and tools employed in the field. Reflecting the growing demand for statistical rigorousness of political science research, the course will introduce the basic tools and concepts including quantitative concept measurement, hypothesis testing, interpretation of statistical evidence, and presentation of findings. The course will put these components together to better understand the topics of political science such as democracy, war, election, or representation, etc.

The primary goal of this course is to equip the political science majors and minors with the ability to read and understand original research in political science. The first half of the course will focus on research design and the basic components of research; research question, concepts, variables, and literature review. The second half of the course will focus on quantitative analysis; hypothesis, data collection, statistical analysis of data, and tools for evaluating a theory.

PSC 352 m001 International Law
Instructor: Claire Sigsworth
Class #: 72195
Offered: Online MTWTh, 10:00 am - 11:45 am
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description 
PSC 352 introduces the principles, practices, and politics of public international law. We consider the origins, evolution, and future of international law as a means of conflict resolution in the global system, and we examine the role of international organizations in making and enforcing the “law of nations.” We also investigate critiques of current legal philosophy and practice. Topics include the legality of the use of force, maritime law, environmental law, and human rights.


Session II (July 1st – August 9th)

PSC 121 m001 American National Government & Politics

Instructor: Aaron Lattanzi
Class #: 70004
Offered: MTWTh, 12:00 pm - 1:45 pm 
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
How does the American political system operate? This course provides an introduction to American political institutions, behaviors, and processes. Topics include (among other things) public opinion, elections, Congress, the presidency, the mass media, civic participation, the Constitution, federalism, and public policy. Although we will cover the “nuts and bolts” of American government, our focus is on political science rather than civics, which means our task is to analyze and interpret political phenomena. Credit is given for PSC 121 or PSC 129, but not both.

PSC 124 m001 International Relations

Instructor: Daniel Jackson
Class #: 72194
Offered: MTWTh, 10:00 am - 11:45 am
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course introduces students to the main issues and actors in contemporary international relations, organized around three major topical perspectives: world structure and theoretical views of that structure; international political economy; and international conflict, cooperation and security. It will focus on current debates around global topics such as human rights, economic interdependence, nationalism, the global environment, and economic disparities. During section meetings, students are encouraged to explore and discuss how states, international institutions, and non-state actors shape current international affairs and future forms of global governance. Credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both.


Online Asynchronous (May 18th-June 26th)

PSC 355 u800 International Political Economy

Instructor: Daniel McDowell
Class #: 70370
Offered: ***ONLINE***
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
From the rise of Donald Trump’s economic populism to Great Britain’s “Brexit” from the European Union, it is impossible to deny the tenuous political underpinnings of economic globalization today. To borrow from Prof. Jeffry Frieden, globalization is a choice, not a fact. That is, the global economic integration we observe today is the product of governments’ policy decisions over a period of many decades. This course introduces the student to the field of international political economy (IPE). IPE studies how politics impacts the global economy and, in return, how the global economy impacts politics. There are two central questions that we will wrestle with in this class. First, what explains the international economic policy choices governments make? Second, what are the effects of those policy choices both within and across countries? Over the course of the session, we will engage with a number of key topics in IPE including: international trade, economic development, multinational corporations, international capital flows, exchange rates, sovereign debt, and financial crises. We will rely on two primary analytic tools: basic economic principles to explain how economic policies influence the distribution of income and political economy theories that explain how politicians set policies. Together, we will use these tools to help understand historical and contemporary phenomena.

* New Listing *PSC 363.u700/PHI 363.u700 Ethics and International Relations 
Instructor: Glyn Morgan
Class #: 72522
Offered: * New Dates *Eight Week Summer Session II Online ASYNCH/SYNCH: 6/29/2020 – 8/20/2020
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course examines the fundamental questions of ethics and international relations. Among the topics addressed: raison d'etat; the just war tradition; humanitarian intervention; terrorism; torture; fair trade; foreign aid; immigration; human rights; nationalism; and climate change.