Undergraduate Study

Spring 2019 Courses

All information in this guide is tentative and subject to change. Check the Political Science Department Office for updates.  Information on rooms and times for the classes listed can be obtained from the university-wide Time Schedule of Classes or from the Political Science office.

“Cross listed” Courses: These may applied to a Political Science major or minor without a petition, regardless of the departmental prefix. For example, if you take African-American Politics as AAS 306, you do not need to petition to apply it to your Political Science major.

"Meets With” Courses": If you take a “Meets With” course under a departmental prefix other than PSC, you will need to petition to count that course towards your Political Science major or minor.

Current information on rooms and times for classes can be obtained on your MySlice or from the Political Science office.

PSC 121 m100 American National Government and Politics
Instructor: Gavan Duffy
Class #: 30744
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm - 4:25 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: None
This course is required for all students who are majoring in Political Science.

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course. 
Discussion # 32827 (Section 101) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am 
Discussion # 32828 (Section 103) Thursdays 2:00 pm-2:55 pm
Discussion # 33408 (Section 105) Thursdays 5:00 pm-5:55 pm
Discussion # 33409 (Section 106) Fridays 11:40 am-12:35 pm

Course Description 
How does the American political system operate? This course provides an introduction to American political institutions, behaviors, and processes. Topics include (among other things) public opinion, elections, Congress, the presidency, the mass media, civic participation, the Constitution, federalism, and public policy. Although we will cover the “nuts and bolts” of American government, our focus is on political science rather than civics, which means our task is to analyze and interpret political phenomena.


PSC 121 m200 American National Government and Politics 
Instructor: Shana Gadarian
Class #: 31462
Offered: M/W 9:30 am-10:25 am 
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: None 
This course is required for all students who are majoring in political science. 

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course. 
Discussion # 31463 (Section 201) Thursdays 3:30 pm-4:25 pm
Discussion # 42180 (Section 202) Fridays 12:45 pm-1:40 pm
Discussion # 42181 (Section 203) Thursdays 5:00 pm-5:55 pm
Discussion # 31464 (Section 204) Fridays 11:40 am-12:35 pm 
Discussion # 31826 (Section 206) Thursdays 2:00 pm-2:55 pm
Discussion # 31959 (Section 207) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am

Course Description 
How does the American political system operate? This course provides an introduction to American political ideas, institutions, behaviors, and processes. Topics include (among other things) the Constitution, Congress, the presidency, the mass media, civic participation, and public policy. Although we will cover the “nuts and bolts” of American government, our focus is on political science rather than civics, which means our task is to analyze and interpret political phenomena.


PSC 123 m100 Comparative Government and Politics 
Instructor: Yüksel Sezgin
Class #: 31822
Offered: M/W 11:40 am - 12:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisites: None 

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course
Discussion # 31823 (Section 101) Thursdays 3:30 pm-4:25 pm
Discussion # 31824 (Section 102) Thursdays 5:00pm-5:55 pm
Discussion # 33410 (Section 103) Fridays 12:45pm-1:40pm 
Discussion # 31825 (Section 104) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm

Course Description 
Why are some countries democratic and others authoritarian? Do democracies provide citizens a better quality of life? Why do civil wars happen in some countries? What are the relations among history, culture, the economy and politics? These are some of the questions that we will cover in class. This is a course intended to introduce students to politics around the world in a comparative perspective. We will examine some of the pressing issues in politics today, and survey the social science literature to see how the theories it develops helps us understand politics better.


PSC 124 m100 International Relations 
Instructor: Terrell Northrup
Class #: 30747
Offered: M/W 11:40 am-12:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 30748 (Section 101) Thursdays 9:30 am-10:25 am
Discussion # 30749 (Section 102) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am
Discussion # 30750 (Section 103) Thursdays 3:30 pm-4:25 pm 
Discussion # 30751 (Section 104) Thursdays 12:30 pm-1:25 pm
Discussion # 31827 (Section 105) Fridays 11:40 am-12:35 pm 
Discussion # 31828 (Section 106) Fridays 2:00 pm-2:55 pm

Meets with PSC 139 m001

Course Description
This course introduces students to the main issues and actors in contemporary international relations, organized around three major topical perspectives: world structure and theoretical views of that structure; international political economy; and international conflict, cooperation and security. It will focus on current debates around global topics such as human rights, economic interdependence, nationalism, the global environment, and economic disparities. During section meetings, students are encouraged to explore and discuss how states, international institutions, and non-state actors shape current international affairs and future forms of global governance.


PSC 124 m300 International Relations 
Instructor: TBA
Class #: 30971
Offered: M/W 10:35 am-11:30 am
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 30972 (Section 302) Fridays 12:45 pm-1:40 pm
Discussion # 33413 (Section 304) Thursdays 9:30 am-10:25 am
Discussion # 31651 (Section 305) Fridays 11:40 am-12:35 pm
Discussion # 33414 (Section 306) Thursdays 11:00 am-11:55 am

Course Description
This course introduces students to the main issues and actors in contemporary international relations, organized around three major topical perspectives: world structure and theoretical views of that structure; international political economy; and international conflict, cooperation and security. It will focus on current debates around global topics such as human rights, economic interdependence, nationalism, the global environment, and economic disparities.  Students are encouraged to explore and discuss how states, international institutions, and non-state actors shape current international affairs and future forms of global governance.


PSC 125 m001 Political Theory 
Instructor: Glyn Morgan
Class #: 32181
Offered: T/Th 5:00 pm-5:55 pm 
Frequency Offered: Yearly Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course
Discussion # 34069 (Section 002) Fridays 9:30 am-10:25 pm
Discussion # 34070 (Section 003) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am
Discussion # 34071 (Section 004) Fridays 12:45 pm-1:40 pm
Discussion # 34072 (Section 005) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm

Meets with PHI 125 

Course Description
This course surveys political theories across large stretches of historical time while closely examining some of the great and near-great works from Plato to the present. The examining instruments are what we think we know today about such topics as rationality, social organization, morality, justice, and critical interpretation. At the end of the course we should have a better understanding of arguments and texts in political theory, and whether and how contemporary political theorists continue the inquiries that began at earlier times in our history. A variety of resources will be used in our journey. Most of the time we will be reading conventional -- what I call linear -- texts that tell a story of political theory from the past to the present. In approximately the last third of the course we will study material from more recent approaches to politics that sometimes maintains, at other times rejects, the theoretical narratives dominating classical and modern thought. The aim here is to illuminate political thought with more recent insights and concepts, often drawn from the work of theorists who question what is taken for granted in traditional theory on the nature of the self, the scope of rationality, and the organization of human communities.


PSC 139 m001 International Relations (Honors) 
Instructor: Terrell Northrup
Class #: 31465
Offered: M/W 11:40 am-12:35 pm; Th 9:30 am-10:25 am 
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisites: None

Meets with PSC 124 m100 

Course Description 
This course explores diverse world views and theoretical perspectives on issues in contemporary international relations, including foreign policy, global political economy, international conflict and cooperation, international law & organizations, and global issues such as health and the environment. Lectures, readings, analytic writing, case analysis, and group discussion. This course is offered ONLY for students currently enrolled in the Syracuse University Renee Crown Honors Program. Students not enrolled in the Crown Honors program must enroll in PSC 124 International Relations. Academic credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both.


PSC 202 m100 Introduction to Political Analysis 
Instructor: Simon Weschle
Class #: 31319
Offered: M/W 5:15 pm-6:10 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: None 
This course is required for all students who are majoring in political science. 

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course. 
Discussion # 31320 (Section 101) Fridays 10:35-11:30 am 
Discussion # 31321 (Section 102) Fridays 10:35-11:30 am 
Discussion # 31322 (Section 103) Fridays 12:45-1:40 pm 
Discussion # 31323 (Section 104) Fridays 12:45-1:40 pm 

Course Description 
The purpose of this course, required for political science majors, is to build skills for conducting, interpreting, and presenting political science research. These skills include: basic research and data collection practices, techniques for measuring political science concepts quantitatively, hypothesis testing, interpretation of statistical evidence, and the presentation of findings in a clear and compelling manner. Tying these components together is a thematic focus on important political science concepts such as democracy, power, or representation.


PSC 202 u001 Introduction to Political Analysis 
Instructor: Tae Hyun Lim
Class #: 41950
Offered: T/Th 5:00 pm-6:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: None 
This course is required for all students who are majoring in political science. 

Course Description 
The purpose of this course, required for political science majors, is to build skills for conducting, interpreting, and presenting political science research. These skills include: basic research and data collection practices, techniques for measuring political science concepts quantitatively, hypothesis testing, interpretation of statistical evidence, and the presentation of findings in a clear and compelling manner. Tying these components together is a thematic focus on important political science concepts such as democracy, power, or representation.


PSC 300 m101 American Political Development 
Instructor: Steven White
Class #: 34065
Offered: M/W 5:15 pm-6:35 pm 
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
How has American politics changed over time? This course addresses major themes in the historical development of American politics, while also introducing students to the American Political Development (APD) framework of political science research. Among other topics, we will examine whether the American federal government is smaller or merely different than that of other countries; the development of the American welfare state, including programs like Social Security and the debate over the national government's role in health care; the extent to which the United States has a distinctly individualistic political culture compared to other western democracies; and the central role of race in American political history.


PSC 300 m103 Race, Ethnicity, and American Politics 
Instructor: Steven White
Class #: 42072
Offered: M/W 3:45 pm-5:05 pm 
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None 

***Please note that you are not eligible to take Race, Ethnicity, and American Politics for credit in spring 2019 if you took Race and Politics in a previous semester***

Course Description
This course examines race and ethnicity in American politics, with particular attention to African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans as voters, activists, and policymakers.


PSC 300 m201 Trump and the Constitution
Instructor: Thomas Keck
Class#: 41968
Offered: T/Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering 
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course examines several leading U.S. constitutional conflicts during the Trump era, including the special counsel investigation and the merits of impeachment as a remedy for constitutional violations.


PSC 300 m203 Multi-track Diplomacy 
Instructor: Frederick Carriere
Class #: 32831
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering 
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course explores the unofficial contacts and other activities conducted by non-state actors – known as track two or second track/citizens’ diplomacy – which facilitate and enhance the effectiveness of the formal, interstate diplomacy conducted through official government channels. This inter-related complex of unofficial and official diplomatic activity – i.e., multi-track diplomacy – will be examined from the perspective of the underlying political, empirical, moral and ethical assumptions deployed to develop engagement strategies, influence public opinion, and organize human and material resources for the management or resolution of international conflicts. It also will include in depth case studies of the diplomatic efforts to resolve major longstanding intractable conflicts, including the Korean Peninsula, Iran and Northern Ireland.


PSC 300 m401 The Character of Self-Worth
Instructor: Laurence Thomas
Class #: 42074
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm 
Frequency Offered: Special Offering 
Prerequisites: None 

Meets with PHI 300.001

Course Description
Description not available – please contact the professor with any questions about this course.


PSC 304 m001 The Judicial Process
Instructor: Domenic Trunfio
Class #: 30752
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites:  None

Course Description
This course will take an in-depth examination of the Criminal Justice System from arrest to appeal, taught by an experienced prosecutor. Students will get a practical, realistic view of criminal justice and the court system through readings, lectures, class discussion and guest speakers who work in the legal system. This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of constitutional law and criminal procedure and will attempt to improve analytical ability and critical thought process.  It will examine how the rights of those accused of a crime are balanced against the rights of those who are victims of crime.  This course will also explore how the judicial process affects average citizens, their communities and American society, and how the system is often inaccurately portrayed in the media and by Hollywood.


PSC 307 m001 The Politics of Citizenship 
Instructor: Elizabeth Cohen
Class #: 32830
Offered: T/Th 11:00 am-12:20 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course focuses on how democratic nations define membership through their constitutions, laws, and practices.  Subjects covered will include the history of the idea of citizenship, the evolution of modern citizenship and the challenges posed to citizenship by mass migration.  We engage questions such as:  who is entitled to be a citizen of a country, what constitutes the legal right to exclude people from citizenship, and what are the characteristic rights and duties of citizenship. We will also look at issues of pressing immediate concern such as undocumented immigration, refugee crises and concerns over border security. The course materials will range from primary sources including constitutions and court cases to secondary studies of citizenship with an emphasis on political theoretical approaches.  Throughout the course students will be asked to respond critically to the ideas that are presented by the reading and in class.  


PSC 308 m001 The Politics of U.S. Public Policy
Instructor: Sarah Pralle
Class #: 42019
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course examines the process of policymaking in the United States. We will ask such questions as, how do particular issues become framed as public policy priorities and placed on the political agenda. How are certain policy alternatives chosen for consideration to the exclusion of others?  Why are some issues considered to be appropriate for government action, and others left to market forces?  How do democratic institutions shape the policymaking process? And we'll consider how policies can be designed so that they play a positive role in solving problems and shaping our society. As we grapple with these concerns, we will focus on a number of case studies. While these questions are often approached in a technical fashion, as if public policy was created and implemented in a scientific laboratory, our approach will acknowledge that public policy is inherently political and cannot be understood apart from the political processes and institutions in which it is created and implemented.


PSC 315 m001 Politics and Media
Instructor: Emily Thorson
Class #: 42077
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course provides an overview of the media’s role in American political life. In doing so, we will focus on several broad themes: the relationship between the media and government; the process of newsmaking and how it shapes the content of political news; and the effects of the media on public opinion and voting behavior. We will also examine recent developments in the media ecosystem, from Facebook algorithms to the rise of "fake news."


PSC 317 m001 Local Internship 
Instructor: Grant Reeher
Class #: 30753
Offered: M/W/F 11:40 am-12:35 pm 
Frequency Offered: Every semester 
Prerequisites: The internship program is intended for juniors and seniors only 

Course Description
The course is based on a local internship experience in politics, public affairs, or the law. Placements are found at the beginning of the semester based on a list provided by the professor. Students also meet once a week in the classroom for organizational discussions, Q&A sessions with local political figures, and advice from professional development experts. Interested students are advised to review a FAQ sheet and recent syllabus, which can be found in 100 Eggers Hall or by contacting the professor.


PSC 318 m001 Technology, Politics, and Environment 
Instructor: William Lambright
Class #: 31324
Offered: M/W/F 3:45 pm-5:05 pm 
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course analyzes the relation of government to policymaking in the domain of environment, where technology and politics intersect in many crucial ways. Attention is given primarily to politics and administration of environmental policy in the US at all levels of government. Comparative and international aspects of the problem are also examined. Particular emphasis is given to the processes by which policy is formulated, implemented and modified.


PSC 321 m001 Populism and Conspiracy Culture
Instructor: Mark Rupert
Class #: 32466
Offered: M/W 12:45 pm-2:05 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
Populist political ideologies claim to speak on behalf of the people and take their side against malevolent social forces that oppress or exploit them – elites, or others represented as alien to, hostile toward, or parasitic upon the people. This course will explore the history of American populisms, with special attention to the rise of powerful strains of right-wing populism that have reshaped the American political landscape from Barry Goldwater to Ronald Reagan to the Trump administration. We will also explore the roots of conspiracy culture in America, linking it to right-wing versions of populism that scapegoat marginalized groups within society by projecting upon them the blame for society’s ills. As Berlet and Lyons (2000, p. 2) have argued, right-wing populism and conspiracism “attract people who often have genuine grievances against elites, but channel such resentments in ways that reinforce social, cultural, political, or economic power and privilege.”


PSC 325 m100 Constitutional Law II 
Instructor: Tom Keck
Class #: 31516
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am 
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisites: Sophomore or above (taken PSC 324 preferred)

Course Description
This course, a continuation of the course sequence that began with Constitutional Law I (PSC 324), focuses on a variety of significant political and legal conflicts regarding the US Constitution from the mid-twentieth century to the present, including civil rights for racial minorities, women, and LGBT persons; reproductive rights; gun rights; religious freedom; free speech; and presidential power during wartime.


PSC 341 m001 Politics of Africa 
Instructor: Horace Campbell
Class #: 34085
Offered: T/Th 11:00 am-12:20 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None 

Cross-listed with AAS 341

Course Description
The objective of the course is to seek to understand the foundations of the political process in Africa. The focus will be to bring to life the humanity of the African people and to understand the processes which have been unleashed to heighten dehumanization. This will require a new epistemology, since in this post fordist era there are new definitions of politics. These definitions seek to deconstruct cold war conceptions of modernization with the old emphasis on elite structures and the simple equation of parties, elections and voting as the basis for political participation. We will seek to understand "politics" and interrogate the relationship between the "personal and the "political".  However, it may be necessary to understand how the very concept of "personal" reinforces the moral ethic of individualism and how this relates to the moral ethic of social collectivism.

It is on the terrain of the politics of gendered constructions where the articulation of African politics has been most underdeveloped. In an attempt to explore the links between gender and politics, it will be necessary to analyze the foundations of the present societies in Africa. This will require an analysis of pre-colonial forms of democratic participation and community solidarity as manifest in the palaver. From this background, it will be necessary to look at the ways in which Europe Underdeveloped Africa and the processes which were set in motion for neo colonial politics. The forms of humanitarianism and external intervention will be analyzed to grasp the continuities of external military involvement in Africa. The politics of Operation Restore Hope will be contrasted to the international response of European and American governments to the issues of destabilization and apartheid.

Because there are over 51 states on the continent it would be unrealistic to cover this vast continent in one semester. Thus, the emphasis of the course will be on theme and methodological tools which would sharpen our analytical skills. Students are encouraged to use their term paper to focus on one society. The lectures and visual presentations will draw from the material and intellectual culture of the region to provide an understanding of the dynamic of the societies.


PSC 342 m001 Religion and Politics in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict 
Instructor: Miriam Elman
Class #: 33399
Offered: T/Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None 

Cross-listed with JSP 342, MES 342, and REL 342

Course Description
The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is one of the world’s most contested and protracted conflicts.
■ How much does religion matter in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict? 
■ Is religion at the root of the conflict?
■ What are the implications of a ‘secular’ peace process?
■ Can religion be a force for peace between Israelis and Palestinians?
This course considers these questions via a cross-disciplinary approach that considers scholarship across the social sciences and humanities, including work by political scientists, religious studies scholars, journalists and media experts, sociologists, and scholars of peace studies and conflict resolution. 


PSC 346 m001 Comparative Third World Politics
Instructor: S.N. Sangmpam
Class #: 33400
Offered: M/W 12:45 pm-2:05 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None 

Cross-listed with AAS 346 

Course Description
The prevailing tendency in the comparative politics of the third world today is to deal with each region or country separately and to emphasize their differences.  Although one needs to recognize such differences, this course proceeds from the assumption that differences can be better understood only via an examination of the similar political features shared by the regions and countries of the third world.  For this reason, the course examines thematically the political systems of South American, Asia, and Africa, exploring such aspects as colonization, decolonization and nation-building, the post-colonial state and its institutional make-up both under authoritarian and democratic regimes, the recent wave of democratization, and the challenges of socioeconomic development.  In order to better apprehend similarities and difference, specific case-studies from the major regions of the third world will be discussed.  To facilitate the understanding of these issues, the course starts with basic concepts and methodologies of comparative politics. 


PSC 349 m001 Politics of Iran
Instructor: Mehrzad Boroujerdi
Class #: 42033
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm - 4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisite: None

Cross-listed with MES 349.001

Course Description
This course will provide students with a historical and theoretical understanding of modern Iranian politics and society from the late nineteenth century to the present. Students will learn about Iran’s cultural ambiance and heritage, ethnic/class/religious cleavages, foreign policy, the causes and consequences of the 1979 revolution, and the nature of the post-revolutionary political system through reading some of the most seminal scholarly essays on these subjects.  


PSC 352 m001 International Law 
Instructor: Audie Klotz
Class #: 42017
Offered: T/Th 12:30 pm-1:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
PSC352 introduces the principles, practices, and politics of public international law. We consider the origins, evolution, and future of international law as a means of conflict resolution in the global system, and we examine the role of international organizations in making and enforcing the “law of nations.” We also investigate critiques of current legal philosophy and practice. Topics include the legality of the use of force, maritime law, environmental law, and human rights.


PSC 358 m001 Latin American International Relations 
Instructor: Francine D’Amico
Class #: 41833
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None 

Cross-listed with LAS 358 

Course Description
Examines Organization of American States and other regional institutions. Considers how regional cooperation efforts have been shaped by political, economic, and cultural diversity of the countries in the region and by the changing global context.


PSC 363 m001 Ethics and International Relations  
Instructor: Glyn Morgan
Class #: 42102
Offered: T/Th 6:30 pm-7:50 pm 
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisite: None

Cross-listed with PHI 363 

Course Description
This course examines the fundamental questions of ethics and international relations.  Among the topics addressed: raison d'etat; the just war tradition; humanitarian intervention; terrorism; torture; fair trade; foreign aid; immigration; human rights; nationalism; and climate change.

 

PSC 374 m001 Law and Society 
Instructor: Yüksel Sezgin
Class #: 41443
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisite: None 

Course Description
This class will treat the law as a process through which the rules of the game is constantly made and remade through interactions between the state and society. In other words, the course will take a diachronic view of legal institutions and norms in the making rather than a view of “the” law as a body of synchronic and pre-established norms. Against this background, students will be introduced to various ways of understanding law’s complex role in the societal and individual domains as a constitutive, regulative and coercive force. In the process, students will be asked to think critically about how law shapes and enables social and individual interactions, how law constructs difference, how law mediates power relationships, how law demarcates communal boundaries, and how law operates in the society as a means of violence, domination and control. Yet, when the law is viewed as such a powerful force both in our private and public lives, the next question that comes to mind is who the ultimate authority, which makes and implements the rules of the game in the society is. In this regard, students will be challenged to think out of the box and approach the question through lenses of legal anthropology and understand the power of culture and its relation to the law. At this point, the course will introduce the concept of legal pluralism, and encourage students to think about the question of whether human societies could function properly without formal institutions and processes of law and justice by looking at various examples of non-state normative orderings. Lastly, the wide array of empirical materials will come from a wide geographical range that includes Brazil, Uruguay, the US, Canada, Russia, India, and South Africa among many others.


PSC 378 m001 Power and Identity 
Instructor: Elizabeth Cohen
Class #: 32835
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm - 4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course examines classic and contemporary theories of identity as well as their manifestation in political practice. We will examine basic theories about how identities are constructed and what meaning/import such constructs have.  This will allow students to critically examine specific manifestations of identity including the role of race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, social class and foreignness in democratic politics. Assigned reading will include normative theory as well as texts drawn from public policies and court decisions.  Students enrolled in the course must participate actively in all discussions and demonstrate serious engagement with the material via thoughtful written assignments.


PSC 382 m001 Contemporary Political Philosophy 
Instructor: Kenneth Baynes
Class #: 42107
Offered: T/Th 11:00 am-12:20 pm 
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisite: None 

Cross-listed with PHI 417 

Course Description
This course examines the works of prominent contemporary theorists of politics through the lens of basic issues central to the organization of social and political life. Such issues will include: globalization, nationalism, distributive justice, citizenship, animal rights, and multiculturalism. Readings will include both abstract theoretical works written by authors including Rawls, Nozick and Isaiah Berlin as well as more concrete and immediately relevant political case studies.


PSC 391 m001 Revolutions in the Middle East 
Instructor: Hossein Bashiryeh
Class #: 32182
Offered: M/W 3:45 pm-5:05 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisite: None

Cross-listed with MES 391

Course Description
Whereas revolutions are more or less abating in other regions of the world today, the Middle East still finds itself in the throes of revolution. A new wave of revolutionary upheavals has begun since January 2011 and continues to shape the politics of the region. In theoretical terms, four aspects of these political revolutions need to be studied: 1) Taxonomy; 2) Etiology; 3) Morphology, and 4) Teleology. Hence, in the first few weeks of the course we will study the major theories of revolution. Then in light of the theoretical discussion, we will explain the new wave of revolutions in the Middle East in terms of their causes and consequences. In every historical case we will discuss the following sequence of processes:
1- The pre-revolutionary authoritarian stability;
2- How crises emerge and provide opportunities for collective action;
3- Oppositions, and their modes of mobilization;
4- The complex interactions between authorities and oppositions including the possibility of repression, accommodation, and revolution;
5- Post-revolutionary power struggles.


PSC 392 m001 Islamism and Islamist Movements
Instructor: Hossein Bashiryeh
Class #: 42030
Offered: M/W 12:45 pm-2:05 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly 
Prerequisites: None 

Cross-listed with MES 392 and REL 362

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to explain various aspects of Islamism as a major contentious political ideology in the world today. Islamism has been described as a traditionalist, militant ideology and movement trying to preserve and reinvent a religious tradition against the forces of secularization, modernization, democratization and globalization. Since its emergence, Islamism has been challenging various aspects of Western modernity. It has emerged out of a deep sense of hostility and indignation and anger against various aspects of modern life. In this course we will study the origins, various generations, types, internal tendencies and trends, as well as the impact of Islamism and Islamist movements in a number of countries in the Middle East as well as in a number of non-Muslim nations.


PSC 400 m301 Civil War
Instructor: Ryan Griffiths
Class#: 42117
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering 
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
Civil War represents one of the most definitive challenges to the legitimacy and authority of the sovereign state. In this course we will survey the latest literature on the topic. We will examine explanations for the causes of civil war, the strategies and tactics that occur during civil war, and civil war termination.

 

PSC 400 m302 Humanitarian Action in World Politics
Instructor: Lamis Abdelaaty
Class#: 34066
Offered: T/Th 12:30 pm-1:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering 
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
This course deals with the global politics of humanitarianism. Topics covered include the historical evolution of humanitarian norms and principles, key actors in the humanitarian sector, and institutional frameworks governing humanitarian action. We also explore the challenges associated with emergency relief, development aid, and military intervention. The emphasis throughout the course is on critically assessing the underlying foundations, dilemmas, and consequences of international humanitarianism.


PSC 400 m303 Human Rights in the Americas
***CANCELED***
Instructor: Kwame Dixon
Class#: 42245
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am
Frequency Offered: Special Offering 
Prerequisites: None 

Meets with AAS 417 and IRP 417

Course Description
Barely a half century after the Universal Declaration of Human Rights the international human rights movement, despite some impressive victories, is in chaotic disarray. The human rights paradigm is being challenged, if not undermined, by leading strategic actors. Security in the name of democracy has triumphed human rights protection.  Moreover, after more than fifty years of international human rights treaties, conventions, covenants, and strong civil society, human rights violations – from genocide, to ethnic cleansing, to the use of child soldiers in warfare – serve to undermine global stability.   Human Rights in the Americas will examine some of the key problems facing the international human rights community and global civil society in their attempt to forge a new human rights paradigm.

 

PSC 434 m001 Pursuing Sustainability Policy 
Instructor: Sherburne Abbott
Class #: 42179
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None 

Cross-listed with GEO 434

Course Description
This course provides an introduction to the pursuit of sustainability policy.  Students will examine whether the complex systems approach to sustainability and sustainable development leads to different priorities, strategies, and methods compared to conventional approaches and analytical tools that are used in environmental policy.  The course will draw from case studies related to energy and climate change, water sustainability, and land use change, as well as theoretical materials. 


PSC 478 m001 Politics of China
Instructor: Dimitar Gueorguiev
Class #: 34058
Offered: W 2:00 pm-3:20 pm 
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None 

Course Description
China’s rise is arguably the most important feature of the 21st Century.  Its growth-driven model of single-party rule challenges democratic ideals nurtured since WWII and its expanding economic and political weight threatens the existing world order.  At the same time, China’s larger-than-life presence belies a fragile domestic environment, riddled with rampant corruption, extreme pollution, and bubbling social tensions.  How did China get to this point and where is it going?  In this class, we explore China’s transition from an impoverished agriculture society to leading world power and assess how China's involvement in the global economy influences its domestic as well as its foreign policy aspirations.  As such, this class should appeal to a broad audience, including those with personal or professional experience in China as well as those with no background in Chinese studies but with a curiosity and concern for the country and its future.

 

PSC 496 m001 Distinction Thesis II 
Instructor: Dimitar Gueorguiev
Class #: 31652
Offered: W 3:45-6:30 pm 
Frequency Offered: Yearly 
Prerequisites: PSC 495 Distinction I 

Course Description
The program requires the student to produce a senior thesis that reflects an understanding of the contemporary literature relevant to the thesis topic, advances an original argument, and presents evidence appropriate to the underlying inquiry. The thesis should generally be modeled after a typical academic journal article in the field of Political Science. The thesis will be read and evaluated by a committee of three, consisting of the main advisor and two additional readers. Two of the readers must be members of the Political Science department. One of the readers may be a graduate student in Political Science. An oral defense will determine if the thesis meets the departmental requirements for distinction.