Undergraduate Study

Spring 2020 Courses

All information in this guide is tentative and subject to change. Check the Political Science Department Office for updates.  Information on rooms and times for the classes listed can be obtained from the university-wide Time Schedule of Classes or from the Political Science office.

“Cross listed” Courses: These may applied to a Political Science major or minor without a petition, regardless of the departmental prefix. For example, if you take African-American Politics as AAS 306, you do not need to petition to apply it to your Political Science major.

"Meets With” Courses": If you take a “Meets With” course under a departmental prefix other than PSC, you will need to petition to count that course towards your Political Science major or minor.

Current information on rooms and times for classes can be obtained on your MySlice or from the Political Science office.

PSC 121 m100 American National Government and Politics

Instructor: Christopher Faricy
Class #: 30736
Offered: T/Th 11:00am – 11:55 am
Frequency Offered: Every semester
Prerequisites: None

This course is required for all students who are majoring in Political Science.

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 32690 (Section 101) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am
Discussion # 32691 (Section 103) Thursdays 2:00 pm-2:55 pm
Discussion # 33191 (Section 105) Thursdays 5:00 pm-5:55 pm
Discussion # 33192 (Section 106) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm

Course Description
How does the American political system operate? This course provides an introduction to American political institutions, behaviors, and processes. Topics include (among other things) public opinion, elections, Congress, the presidency, the mass media, civic participation, the Constitution, federalism, and public policy. Although we will cover the “nuts and bolts” of American government, our focus is on political science rather than civics, which means our task is to analyze and interpret political phenomena.

PSC 121 m200 American National Government and Politics

Instructor: Shana Gadarian
Class #: 314613
Offered: M/W 9:30 am-10:25 am
Frequency Offered: Every semester
Prerequisites: None

This course is required for all students who are majoring in political science.

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 31414 (Section 201) Thursdays 3:30 pm-4:25 pm
Discussion # 34277 (Section 202) Fridays 12:45 pm-1:40 pm
Discussion # 34278 (Section 203) Thursdays 5:00 pm-5:55 pm
Discussion # 31415 (Section 204) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm
Discussion # 31765 (Section 206) Thursdays 2:00 pm-2:55 pm
Discussion # 31889 (Section 207) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am

Course Description
How does the American political system operate? This course provides an introduction to American political ideas, institutions, behaviors, and processes. Topics include (among other things) the Constitution, Congress, the presidency, the mass media, civic participation, and public policy. Although we will cover the “nuts and bolts” of American government, our focus is on political science rather than civics, which means our task is to analyze and interpret political phenomena.

PSC 123 m100 Comparative Government and Politics *

Instructor: Erin Hern
Class #: 31761
Offered: M/W 11:40 am - 12:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 31762 (Section 101) Thursdays 3:30 pm-4:25 pm
Discussion # 31763 (Section 102) Thursdays 5:00pm-5:55 pm
Discussion # 33193 (Section 103) Fridays 12:45pm-1:40pm
Discussion # 31764 (Section 104) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm

Course Description
Why are some countries democratic and others authoritarian? Do democracies provide citizens a better quality of life? Why do civil wars happen in some countries? What are the relations among history, culture, the economy and politics? These are some of the questions that we will cover in class. This is a course intended to introduce students to politics around the world in a comparative perspective. We
will examine some of the pressing issues in politics today, and survey the social science literature to see how the theories it develops helps us understand politics better.

PSC 124 m100 International Relations *

Instructor: Terrell Northrup
Class #: 30737
Offered: M/W 11:40 am-12:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester
Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 30738 (Section 101) Thursdays 9:30 am-10:25 am
Discussion # 30739 (Section 102) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am
Discussion # 30740 (Section 103) Thursdays 3:30 pm-4:25 pm
Discussion # 30741 (Section 104) Thursdays 12:30 pm-1:25 pm
Discussion # 31766 (Section 105) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm
Discussion # 31767 (Section 106) Thursdays 2:00 pm-2:55 pm

Meets with PSC 139 m001

Course Description
This course introduces students to the main issues and actors in contemporary international relations, organized around three major topical perspectives: world structure and theoretical views of that structure; international political economy; and international conflict, cooperation and security. It will focus on current debates around global topics such as human rights, economic interdependence, nationalism, the global environment, and economic disparities. During section meetings, students are encouraged to explore and discuss how states, international institutions, and non-state actors shape current international affairs and future forms of global governance.

PSC 124 m300 International Relations *

Instructor: Daniel McDowell
Class #: 30956
Offered: M/W 10:35 am-11:30 am
Frequency Offered: Every semester
Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 30957 (Section 302) Fridays 12:45 pm-1:40 pm
Discussion # 33194 (Section 304) Thursdays 9:30 am-10:25 am
Discussion # 31596 (Section 305) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm
Discussion # 33195 (Section 306) Thursdays 11:00 am-11:55 am

Course Description
This course introduces students to the main issues and actors in contemporary international relations, organized around three major topical perspectives: world structure and theoretical views of that structure; international political economy; and international conflict, cooperation and security. It will focus on current debates around global topics such as human rights, economic interdependence, nationalism, the global environment, and economic disparities. Students are encouraged to explore and discuss how states, international institutions, and non-state actors shape current international affairs and future forms of global governance.

PSC 125 m001 Political Theory

Instructor: Dennis Rasmussen
Class #: 32093
Offered: M/W 10:35 am -11:30 am
Frequency Offered: Yearly Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 33632 (Section 002) Fridays 9:30 am-10:25 pm
Discussion # 33633 (Section 003) Fridays 10:35 am-11:30 am
Discussion # 33634 (Section 004) Fridays 12:45 pm-1:40 pm
Discussion # 33635 (Section 005) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm

Meets with PHI 125

Course Description
This course examines some of the most important thinkers and concepts of modern political philosophy, including the rejection of ancient political philosophy and the rise of liberalism (Hobbes, Locke, Mill, and a brief look at the American founding) as well as critiques of the liberal outlook in the name of nature and virtue (Rousseau), tradition and custom (Burke), equality and liberation (Marx), and creativity and greatness (Nietzsche). In addition to exploring the various conceptions of nature, human nature, justice, freedom, history, and the good life in the works of these thinkers, we will also use their arguments to reflect on the health or illness of liberal democracy in today’s world.

PSC 139 m001 International Relations (Honors) *

Instructor: Terrell Northrup
Class #: 31416
Offered: M/W 11:40 am-12:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: None

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 34000 (Section 002) Thursdays 9:30 am-10:25 am

Meets with PSC 124 m100

Course Description
This course explores diverse world views and theoretical perspectives on issues in contemporary international relations, including foreign policy, global political economy, international conflict and cooperation, international law & organizations, and global issues such as health and the environment. Lectures, readings, analytic writing, case analysis, and group discussion. This course is offered ONLY for students currently enrolled in the Syracuse University Renee Crown Honors Program. Students not enrolled in the Crown Honors program must enroll in PSC 124 International Relations. Academic credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both

PSC 202 m100 Introduction to Political Analysis

Instructor: Simon Weschle
Class #: 31274
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:10 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester
Prerequisites: None

This course is required for all students who are majoring in political science

All students must also enroll in a discussion section listed for this course.
Discussion # 31275 (Section 101) Fridays 10:35-11:30 am
Discussion # 31276 (Section 102) Fridays 10:35-11:30 am
Discussion # 31277 (Section 103) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm
Discussion # 31278 (Section 104) Fridays 2:15 pm-3:10 pm
Discussion # 42490 (Section 105) Fridays 9:30 am-10:25 pm
Discussion # 42491 (Section 106) Fridays 9:30 am-10:25 pm

Course Description
The purpose of this course, required for political science majors, is to build skills for conducting, interpreting, and presenting political science research. These skills include: basic research and data collection practices, techniques for measuring political science concepts quantitatively, hypothesis testing, interpretation of statistical evidence, and the presentation of findings in a clear and compelling manner. Tying these components together is a thematic focus on important political science concepts such as democracy, power, or representation.

PSC 300 m101 Policy Implementation

Instructor: Zachary Huitink
Class #: 42610
Offered: T/Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Meets with PAI 300.002

Course Description
This course is about how public policy gets put into action, with a focus on developing knowledge and skills essential for addressing some of society’s most complex problems. The course will help you understand what we really mean when we say “policy implementation,” as well as some realities of implementation as it is done in practice. The course will stress, in particular, the widespread roles of not only government but also the private and nonprofit sectors at all levels in the implementation process, and how these actors use policy tools like regulations, grants, vouchers, and public-private partnerships to get things done. Government and non-governmental actors have taken numerous approaches to achieving public policy goals, from (among many others) reducing poverty and improving education to ensuring public health and safety, protecting the environment, and recovering from disasters. What are the trade-offs of different strategies to pursuing goals like these, and why has the record of achievement been mixed? How do government, business, nonprofits, and individual members of the public contribute to implementation efforts? How can they work better with one another to make public policy successful? How do we assess whether policies have had their intended impacts on people and communities? Students will consider these questions through a mix of lecture, discussion, examples, and hands-on exercises, and develop abilities in areas including policy field mapping, logic modelling, planning, and applied implementation analysis..

PSC 300 m102 Education Policy

Instructor: Ying Shi
Class #: 42613
Offered: M 9:30 am-12:15 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Meets with PAI 300.001

Course Description
This course introduces students to the education policy landscape in the U.S. We begin with an overview of how schools work and the roles of key actors at the federal, state, and local levels. We then discuss the standards of evidence alongside empirical tools and data sources that are relevant for
identifying policy problems. Next the course walks through a set of education policy issues, including school funding and accountability reforms. Students will have the opportunity to investigate specific dimensions of education policy such as low-performing schools and achievement gaps, use evidence to diagnose potential problems, and develop solutions.

PSC 300 m103 Black Feminist Politics

Instructor: Jenn Jackson
Class #: 34267
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Meets with WGS 300.003

Course Description
This seminar critically examines key issues, assumptions, and debates in contemporary, post-civil rights Black Feminist thought, action, and behavior. As such, we will understand that Black Feminism is global and diasporic. We will begin with a survey and broad analysis of Black Feminist history and origins. We will pay particular attention to how Black Feminists make use of standpoint theory, Black nationalism, Black liberalism, liberal feminism, Black Marxism, and radical feminist thought. We will also investigate the simultaneity of race, gender, class, and sexual oppression and its relationship to power. This means that we will draw connections between Black Feminist models and contemporary queer and trans politics. In this course, we will also focus on Black feminist understandings of intersectionality, the history of this analytical frame, and how this framework has contributed to today’s politics. The particular questions we will analyze include but are not limited to the following: How do we evaluate Black movements and leadership using a Black Feminist lens? What is the relationship between racism, gender based oppression, homophobia, and classism in Black women’s lives? What forms of resistance do many Black women engage in? How do these decisions shape politics

PSC 300 m104 US Intelligence Community *

Instructor: Robert Murrett
Class #: 34267
Offered: T/Th 8:00 am-9:20 am
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Meets with PAI 300.004 and IRP 300.001

Course Description
This course will focus on the practice, structure and governance of the intelligence field, and material that has a direct bearing on its current posture. Students will study the functional elements of intelligence tradecraft (human intelligence, signals intelligence, imagery analysis, etc.), and engagement with international counterparts. The course will review governance and oversight of the Intelligence Community (I.C), and in order to understand the full range of today’s intelligence activities, students will examine the evolution of the I.C. since its inception in 1947 through the present day. Key phases and specific events will be explored, including I.C. efforts throughout the Cold War, The Cuban Missile Crisis, The Vietnam Conflict, the Church Committee, the Balkans Conflicts, pre and post-9/11 operations, the 911 and WMD Commissions and the subsequent executive and legislative changes implemented over the past decade. The class will participate in case studies, in which the students will evaluate, provide briefings and recommend decisions in realistic scenarios, both in terms of analysis and intelligence-driven decision-making on policy and operational matters.

PSC 300 m201 Islamic Law and Society *

Instructor: Yüksel Sezgin
Class#: 34232
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Meets with MES 300.003, SAS 300.001, and REL 300.003

Course Description
This course provides an introduction both to classical and modern versions of the Islamic law that continue to guide and regulate the lives of hundreds of millions of Muslims in the contemporary Middle East and South Asia. The course explores origins, sources, institutions, and historical evolution of classical Islamic law, and problematizes the appropriation of so-called “divine” law by colonial and postcolonial states. The course adopts the law-in-society approach to the study of Islamic law and discusses in detail Islamic constitutionalism, Islamic criminal laws, Islamic family laws, gender, political violence, Islamic banking, insurance, and human rights through examination of various case studies from Egypt, Iran, Saudi Arabia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Malaysia among others. Additionally, the course adopts a cross-cultural approach to allow students to better understand Islamic law by studying religio-legal and normative differences and similarities among Islamic, Jewish, Hindu, and Christian traditions.

PSC 300 m203 Multi-track Diplomacy *

Instructor: Frederick Carriere
Class #: 32694
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course explores the unofficial contacts and other activities conducted by non-state actors – known as track two or second track/citizens’ diplomacy – which facilitate and enhance the effectiveness of the formal, interstate diplomacy conducted through official government channels. This inter-related complex of unofficial and official diplomatic activity – i.e., multi-track diplomacy – will be examined from the perspective of the underlying political, empirical, moral and ethical assumptions deployed to develop engagement strategies, influence public opinion, and organize human and material resources for the management or resolution of international conflicts. It also will include in depth case studies of the diplomatic efforts to resolve major longstanding intractable conflicts, including the Korean Peninsula, Iran and Northern Ireland.

PSC 300 u301 Politics of Immigration *

Instructor: Ugur Altundal
Class #: 42316
Offered: T/Th 5:00 pm-6:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
Immigration has become a major topic in both domestic and global politics. This course introduces key scholarly debates in the study of migration in political science, and aims to provide students with ethical, theoretical, and empirical frameworks to gain a deeper understanding of international migration.

PSC 304 m001 The Judicial Process

Instructor: Domenic Trunfio
Class #: 30742
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm-4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course will take an in-depth examination of the Criminal Justice System from arrest to appeal, taught by an experienced prosecutor. Students will get a practical, realistic view of criminal justice and the court system through readings, lectures, class discussion and guest speakers who work in the legal system. This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of constitutional law and criminal procedure and will attempt to improve analytical ability and critical thought process. It will examine how the rights of those accused of a crime are balanced against the rights of those who are victims of
crime. This course will also explore how the judicial process affects average citizens, their communities and American society, and how the system is often inaccurately portrayed in the media and by Hollywood

PSC 307 m001 The Politics of Citizenship

Instructor: Elizabeth Cohen
Class #: 32693
Offered: T/Th 11:00 am-12:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course focuses on how democratic nations define membership through their constitutions, laws, and practices. Subjects covered will include the history of the idea of citizenship, the evolution of modern citizenship and the challenges posed to citizenship by mass migration. We engage questions such as: who is entitled to be a citizen of a country, what constitutes the legal right to exclude people from citizenship, and what are the characteristic rights and duties of citizenship. We will also look at issues of pressing immediate concern such as undocumented immigration, refugee crises and concerns over border security. The course materials will range from primary sources including constitutions and court cases to secondary studies of citizenship with an emphasis on political theoretical approaches. Throughout the course students will be asked to respond critically to the ideas that are presented by the reading and in class.

PSC 308 m001 The Politics of U.S. Public Policy

Instructor: Sarah Pralle
Class #: 42019
Offered: T/Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course examines the process of policymaking in the United States. We will ask such questions as, how do particular issues become framed as public policy priorities and placed on the political agenda. How are certain policy alternatives chosen for consideration to the exclusion of others? Why are some issues considered to be appropriate for government action, and others left to market forces? How do democratic institutions shape the policymaking process? And we'll consider how policies can be designed so that they play a positive role in solving problems and shaping our society. As we grapple with these concerns, we will focus on a number of case studies. While these questions are often approached in a technical fashion, as if public policy was created and implemented in a scientific
laboratory, our approach will acknowledge that public policy is inherently political and cannot be understood apart from the political processes and institutions in which it is created and implemented

PSC 314 m001 Public Opinion & Electoral Behavior

Instructor: Emily Thorson
Class #: 42385
Offered: T/Th 12:30 pm-1:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course will tackle a series of big questions about the role of citizens' attitudes and opinions in contemporary democracy: How do people make sense of the political world? How does public opinion shape policies? How can we understand today's politically polarized climate? We will consider the history of public opinion as well as how our understanding of it is changing in an era of Facebook and Twitter. The course will go beyond discussions of polling data to explore the role of media content, political talk, and social identities in shaping what we think about politics and public life. Students will write an original research paper about a public opinion topic of their choice.

PSC 315 m001 Politics and Media

Instructor: Emily Thorson
Class #: 42070
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course provides an overview of the media’s role in American political life. In doing so, we will focus on several broad themes: the relationship between the media and government; the process of newsmaking and how it shapes the content of political news; and the effects of the media on public opinion and voting behavior. We will also examine recent developments in the media ecosystem, from Facebook algorithms to the rise of "fake news.

PSC 317 m001 Local Internship

Instructor: Grant Reeher
Class #: 30743
Offered: M/W/F 11:40 am-12:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Every semester
Prerequisites: The internship program is intended for juniors and seniors only

Course Description
The course is based on a local internship experience in politics, public affairs, or the law. Placements are found at the beginning of the semester based on a list provided by the professor. Students also meet once a week in the classroom for organizational discussions, Q&A sessions with local political figures, and advice from professional development experts. Interested students are advised to review a FAQ sheet and recent syllabus, which can be found in 100 Eggers Hall or by contacting the professor.

PSC 318 m001 Technology, Politics, and Environment

Instructor: William Lambright
Class #: 31279
Offered: M/W 3:45 pm-5:05 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course analyzes the relation of government to policymaking in the domain of environment, where technology and politics intersect in many crucial ways. Attention is given primarily to politics and administration of environmental policy in the US at all levels of government. Comparative and international aspects of the problem are also examined. Particular emphasis is given to the processes by which policy is formulated, implemented and modified.

PSC 321 m001 Populism and Conspiracy Culture

Instructor: Mark Rupert
Class #: 32362
Offered: M/W 12:45 pm-2:05 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
Populist political ideologies claim to speak on behalf of the people and take their side against malevolent social forces that oppress or exploit them – elites, or others represented as alien to, hostile toward, or parasitic upon the people. This course will explore the history of American populisms, with special attention to the rise of powerful strains of right-wing populism that have reshaped the American political landscape from Barry Goldwater to Ronald Reagan to the Trump administration. We will also explore the roots of conspiracy culture in America, linking it to right-wing versions of populism that scapegoat marginalized groups within society by projecting upon them the blame for society’s ills. As Berlet and Lyons (2000, p. 2) have argued, right-wing populism and conspiracism “attract people who often have genuine grievances against elites, but channel such resentments in ways that reinforce social, cultural, political, or economic power and privilege.”

PSC 325 m100 Constitutional Law II

Instructor: Casey Sprock
Class #: 31464
Offered: T/Th 5:00 pm-6:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: Sophomore or above (taken PSC 324 preferred)

Course Description
This course, a continuation of the course sequence that began with Constitutional Law I (PSC 324), focuses on a variety of significant political and legal conflicts regarding the US Constitution from the mid-twentieth century to the present, including civil rights for racial minorities, women, and LGBT persons; reproductive rights; gun rights; religious freedom; free speech; and presidential power during wartime

PSC 326.001 Foundations of American Political Thought

Instructor: Dennis Rasmussen
Class #: 42190
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: None

Cross-listed with HST 383

Course Description
This course examines American political thought through the mid-nineteenth century, concentrating on the founding debate, the development of Lincoln’s thought and the Civil War, and Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America. Topics include the nation’s Puritan origins and founding documents, the challenges posed by the Anti-Federalists, the defense of the large republic in The Federalist, the problems presented by slavery, the proper role of a democratic statesman, and Tocqueville's hopes and worries about liberal democratic society and government (especially its American variant).

PSC 329 m001 The Modern American Presidency

Instructor: Margaret Thompson
Class #: 42275
Offered: T/Th 12:30 pm-1:50pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisites: None

Cross-listed with HST 341

Course Description
This course will analyze the evolution of the modern presidency and its present operation. The focus of our attention will be on the years since the Second World War, and especially on those since 1960. The decision making process and operation of presidential administrations from Kennedy to Trump will be studied in detail; we will also discuss presidential elections—especially in the context of this important election year. We shall consider the various roles that the president plays in government, politics and society. The presidency as an institution and as an individual office will be examined to identify factors that have contributed to the successes and failures of particular administrations. This course shall also examine the roles and influence of unelected officials (esp. senior White House staff), and popular attitudes toward both the symbolic and the practical presidency—especially as they have been shaped by the traditional mass media and the “new media” (especially online interactivity). We will consider what lasting effects, if any, events during the last quarter century have had upon the presidency as an institution. Finally, we will leave space for discussion of breaking news and unexpected developments, especially those related to the primaries, caucuses—and impeachment.

PSC 341 m001 Politics of Africa *

Instructor: Horace Campbell
Class #: 33644
Offered: T/Th 11:00 am-12:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Cross-listed with AAS 341 and meets with PAI 500

Course Description
The objective of the course is to seek to understand the foundations of the political process in Africa. The focus will be to bring to life the humanity of the African people and to understand the processes which have been unleashed to heighten dehumanization. This will require a new epistemology, since in this post fordist era there are new definitions of politics. These definitions seek to deconstruct cold war conceptions of modernization with the old emphasis on elite structures and the simple equation of parties, elections and voting as the basis for political participation. We will seek to understand "politics" and interrogate the relationship between the "personal and the "political". However, it may be necessary to understand how the very concept of "personal" reinforces the moral ethic of individualism and how this relates to the moral ethic of social collectivism.
It is on the terrain of the politics of gendered constructions where the articulation of African politics has been most underdeveloped. In an attempt to explore the links between gender and politics, it will be necessary to analyze the foundations of the present societies in Africa. This will require an analysis of
pre-colonial forms of democratic participation and community solidarity as manifest in the palaver. From this background, it will be necessary to look at the ways in which Europe Underdeveloped Africa and the processes which were set in motion for neo colonial politics. The forms of humanitarianism and external intervention will be analyzed to grasp the continuities of external military involvement in Africa. The politics of Operation Restore Hope will be contrasted to the international response of European and American governments to the issues of destabilization and apartheid.
Because there are over 51 states on the continent it would be unrealistic to cover this vast continent in one semester. Thus, the emphasis of the course will be on theme and methodological tools which would sharpen our analytical skills. Students are encouraged to use their term paper to focus on one society. The lectures and visual presentations will draw from the material and intellectual culture of the region to provide an understanding of the dynamic of the societies.

PSC 343 m001 Politics of Europe *

Instructor: Seth Jolly
Class #: 42412
Offered: T/Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to familiarize you with the politics of Europe, not on a country by country basis, but in a truly comparative way. We will study various aspects of European politics including domestic political and economic institutions, the process of European integration, and current events such as immigration and the Euro crisis. For each topic we will compare a range of European countries, but, following the textbook, we will focus on several European countries in more detail.

PSC 347 m001 Politics of Russia *

Instructor: Brian Taylor
Class #: 42374
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course is an introduction to the politics of the Russian Federation (Russia). The course is divided into two, unequal parts. The first, short part is organized chronologically and covers the period up to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. The goal for this part of the course is to provide some minimal, essential background for those who have never had a course in Russian or Soviet history. The second, longer part of the course is organized thematically and covers the 26 years since the Soviet collapse.
We study the basic institutional structure of Russian politics, learn about Vladimir Putin and his worldview, investigate some important challenges facing Russia today, assess the political, economic, and social order created over the last two and a half decades, and seek to understand Russia’s current place in the world and where the country is going.

PSC 349 m001 Politics of Iran *

Instructor: TBD
Class #: 34259
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm - 4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisite: None

Cross-listed with MES 349.001

Course Description
This course will provide students with a historical and theoretical understanding of modern Iranian politics and society from the late nineteenth century to the present. Students will learn about Iran’s cultural ambiance and heritage, ethnic/class/religious cleavages, foreign policy, the causes and consequences of the 1979 revolution, and the nature of the post-revolutionary political system through reading some of the most seminal scholarly essays on these subjects.

PSC 351 m001 Political Economy of Development *

Instructor: Erin Hern
Class #: 42289
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
How is the political economy of developing countries different than that of developed countries? By definition, developing countries have lower national incomes than developed countries, but poverty alone cannot explain the different political and economic processes in the developing world. This course examines how colonial history and late state formation influences contemporary political and economic institutions and how developing “late” changes the rules of the game in the international economy. In the contemporary period, it examines the relationship between economic development and democracy, democracy and “good governance,” the challenges to “acting like a state” in the developing world, and the relationship dynamics between developing countries and the international community.How is the political economy of developing countries different than that of developed countries? By definition, developing countries have lower national incomes than developed countries, but poverty alone cannot explain the different political and economic processes in the developing world. This course examines how colonial history and late state formation influences contemporary political and economic institutions and how developing “late” changes the rules of the game in the international economy. In the contemporary period, it examines the relationship between economic development and democracy, democracy and “good governance,” the challenges to “acting like a state” in the developing world, and the relationship dynamics between developing countries and the international community.

PSC 353 m001 International Organization *

Instructor: Francine D’Amico
Class #: 42305
Offered: T/Th 9:30 am-10:50 am
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
In this course we examine the origins and operations of international organizations in international relations. We begin with an exploration of the membership, structure, purpose, and function of the United Nations Organization (UNO), then undertake a comparative analysis of three multipurpose regional intergovernmental organizations (IGOs): the European Union (EU), the Organization of American States (OAS), and the African Union (formerly the Organization for African Unity-OAU). We will also investigate several nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) engaged in work on human rights and globalization. Our goal is to understand the role and significance of each organization in contemporary international relations.

PSC 355 m001 International Political Economy *

Instructor: Daniel McDowell
Class #: 42413
Offered: M/W 12:45 pm-2:05 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
From the rise of Donald Trump’s economic populism to Great Britain’s “Brexit” from the European Union, it is impossible to deny the tenuous political underpinnings of economic globalization today. To borrow from Prof. Jeffry Frieden, globalization is a choice, not a fact. That is, the global economic integration we observe today is the product of governments’ policy decisions over a period of many decades. This course introduces the student to the field of international political economy (IPE). IPE studies how politics impacts the global economy and, in return, how the global economy impacts politics. There are two central questions that we will wrestle with in this class. First, what explains the international economic policy choices governments make? Second, what are the effects of those policy choices both within and across countries? Over the course of the session, we will engage with a number of key topics in IPE including: international trade, economic development, multinational corporations, international capital flows, exchange rates, sovereign debt, and financial crises. We will rely on two primary analytic tools: basic economic principles to explain how economic policies influence the distribution of income and political economy theories that explain how politicians set policies. Together, we will use these tools to help understand historical and contemporary phenomena.

PSC 357 m001 U.S. Foreign Policy *

Instructor: Ryan Griffiths
Class #: 42375
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
A survey and critique of US foreign policy for advanced undergraduate majors in Political Science and International Relations. In this course we examine the evolution of foreign policy since the birth of the country. We investigate why American primacy came to be, what its consequences are, and what will drive US foreign policy in the future. Attention will be given to historical analysis, grand strategy, and a range of contemporary policy issues from the rise of China to the threat of terrorism. In addition, we will examine the challenges of decision-making from the perspective of the practitioner who must deal with problems of individual choice, small groups, bureaucratic politics, organizational constraints, and public opinion. The aim of the course is to give students the theoretical and analytical tools necessary to think critically about the past, present, and future of US foreign policy, and its implications for international relations.

PSC 363 m001 Ethics and International Relations *

Instructor: Glyn Morgan
Class #: 34271
Offered: T/Th 6:30 pm-7:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly
Prerequisite: None

Cross-listed with PHI 363

Course Description
This course examines the fundamental questions of ethics and international relations. Among the topics addressed: raison d'etat; the just war tradition; humanitarian intervention; terrorism; torture; fair trade; foreign aid; immigration; human rights; nationalism; and climate change.

PSC 373 m001 The Social Contract Tradition and its Critics

Instructor: Kenneth Baynes
Class #: 42494
Offered: T/Th 11:00 am-12:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisite: None

Crosslisted with PHI 317.001

Course Description
This course will explore the idea of the social contract as a basis for political obligation and political authority as well as various criticisms of that view of the social contract. Readings will include both classic and contemporary texts, including Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Rawls, Pateman and Mills.

PSC 378 m001 Power and Identity

Instructor: Elizabeth Cohen
Class #: 32697
Offered: T/Th 3:30 pm - 4:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course examines classic and contemporary theories of identity as well as their manifestation in political practice. We will examine basic theories about how identities are constructed and what meaning/import such constructs have. This will allow students to critically examine specific manifestations of identity including the role of race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, social class and foreignness in democratic politics. Assigned reading will include normative theory as well as texts drawn from public policies and court decisions. Students enrolled in the course must participate actively in all discussions and demonstrate serious engagement with the material via thoughtful written assignments.

PSC 391 m001 Revolutions in the Middle East *

Instructor: Hossein Bashiryeh
Class #: 32094
Offered: M/W 3:45 pm-5:05 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisite: None

Cross-listed with MES 391

Course Description
Whereas revolutions are more or less abating in other regions of the world today, the Middle East still finds itself in the throes of revolution. A new wave of revolutionary upheavals has begun since January 2011 and continues to shape the politics of the region. In theoretical terms, four aspects of these political revolutions need to be studied: 1) Taxonomy; 2) Etiology; 3) Morphology, and 4) Teleology. Hence, in the first few weeks of the course we will study the major theories of revolution. Then in light of the theoretical discussion, we will explain the new wave of revolutions in the Middle East in terms of their causes and consequences. In every historical case we will discuss the following sequence of processes:
1- The pre-revolutionary authoritarian stability;
2- How crises emerge and provide opportunities for collective action;
3- Oppositions, and their modes of mobilization;
4- The complex interactions between authorities and oppositions including the possibility of repression, accommodation, and revolution;
5- Post-revolutionary power struggles.

PSC 392 m001 Islamism and Islamist Movements *

Instructor: Hossein Bashiryeh
Class #: 34258
Offered: M/W 12:45 pm-2:05 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Cross-listed with MES 392 and REL 362

Course Description
The purpose of this course is to explain various aspects of Islamism as a major contentious political ideology in the world today. Islamism has been described as a traditionalist, militant ideology and movement trying to preserve and reinvent a religious tradition against the forces of secularization, modernization, democratization and globalization. Since its emergence, Islamism has been challenging various aspects of Western modernity. It has emerged out of a deep sense of hostility and indignation and anger against various aspects of modern life. In this course we will study the origins, various generations, types, internal tendencies and trends, as well as the impact of Islamism and Islamist movements in a number of countries in the Middle East as well as in a number of non-Muslim nations.

PSC 400 m101 Poverty Policy

Instructor: Colleen Heflin
Class#: 42611
Offered: W 9:30 am -12:15 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This seminar will examine the nature and extent of poverty in the U.S., its causes and consequences, and the antipoverty effects of existing and proposed government programs and policies. The following questions will be addressed: What is poverty? Why is poverty so persistent? Why are poverty rates for minorities so high? What are the dynamics of rural poverty? What are the goals and purposes of social welfare programs? How has welfare reform changed the playing field? Is marriage a viable antipoverty strategy? Is there a culture of poverty? How are immigration and demographic trends changing the U.S. demographic profile? How do the current economic and housing crises impact people in poverty?

PSC 400 m302 Humanitarian Action in World Politics *

Instructor: Lamis Abdelaaty
Class#: 33629
Offered: T/Th 12:30 pm-1:50 pm
Frequency Offered: Special Offering
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
This course deals with the global politics of humanitarianism. Topics covered include the historical evolution of humanitarian norms and principles, key actors in the humanitarian sector, and institutional frameworks governing humanitarian action. We also explore the challenges associated with emergency relief, development aid, and military intervention. The emphasis throughout the course is on critically assessing the underlying foundations, dilemmas, and consequences of international humanitarianism.

PSC 434 m001 Pursuing Sustainability Policy

Instructor: Sherburne Abbott
Class #: 34276
Offered: M/W 2:15 pm-3:35 pm
Frequency Offered: OfferedYearly
Prerequisites: None

Cross-listed with GEO 434

Course Description
This course provides an introduction to the pursuit of sustainability policy. Students will examine whether the complex systems approach to sustainability and sustainable development leads to different priorities, strategies, and methods compared to conventional approaches and analytical tools
that are used in environmental policy. The course will draw from case studies related to energy and climate change, water sustainability, and land use change, as well as theoretical materials.

PSC 478 m001 Politics of China *

Instructor: Dimitar Gueorguiev
Class #: 33625
Offered: T/Th 2:00 pm-3:20 pm
Frequency Offered: Irregularly
Prerequisites: None

Course Description
China’s rise is arguably the most important feature of the 21st Century. Its growth-driven model of single-party rule challenges democratic ideals nurtured since WWII and its expanding economic and political weight threatens the existing world order. At the same time, China’s larger-than-life presence belies a fragile domestic environment, riddled with rampant corruption, extreme pollution, and bubbling social tensions. How did China get to this point and where is it going? In this class, we explore China’s transition from an impoverished agriculture society to leading world power and assess how China's involvement in the global economy influences its domestic as well as its foreign policy aspirations. As such, this class should appeal to a broad audience, including those with personal or professional experience in China as well as those with no background in Chinese studies but with a curiosity and concern for the country and its future.

PSC 496 m001 Distinction Thesis II

Instructor: Dimitar Gueorguiev
Class #: 31597
Offered: W 3:45-6:30 pm
Frequency Offered: Yearly

Prerequisites: PSC 495 Distinction I

Course Description
The program requires the student to produce a senior thesis that reflects an understanding of the contemporary literature relevant to the thesis topic, advances an original argument, and presents evidence appropriate to the underlying inquiry. The thesis should generally be modeled after a typical academic journal article in the field of Political Science. The thesis will be read and evaluated by a committee of three, consisting of the main advisor and two additional readers. Two of the readers must be members of the Political Science department. One of the readers may be a graduate student in Political Science. An oral defense will determine if the thesis meets the departmental requirements for distinction.