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New study explores effect of preemption laws on infant mortality rate

Jan 19, 2021

Effects of US state preemption laws on infant mortality

Douglas A. Wolf, Shannon M. Monnat & Jennifer Karas Montez

Preventive Medicine

Douglas A. Wolf

Douglas A. Wolf


Shannon Monnat

Shannon Monnat


Jennifer Karas Montez

Jennifer Karas Montez


"Effects of US state preemption laws on infant mortality," co-authored by Maxwell professors Douglas Wolf, Shannon Monnat and Jennifer Karas Montez, was published in Preventive Medicine. States are increasingly preempting city and county governments from enacting policies that benefit workers, such as raising the minimum wage. The authors found that each additional dollar of minimum wage reduces infant deaths by up to 1.8 percent annually in large U.S. cities. Additionally, in the 25 states that preempted minimum wage increases since 2001, over 600 infants could have been saved annually if localities had been allowed to raise their wage to $9.99. 01/19/21

Center for Policy Research
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