ASI community collab benefits older adults with cognitive decline

Maria BrownNovember 15, 2018

A recently launched pilot project to screen for cognitive decline as part of routine community health services currently offered to older adults is expected to demonstrate the benefits of early detection of Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias (AD/D). One major benefit is the potential of keeping Syracuse-area adults aged 65 and older healthy and safe in their homes for as long as possible.

A $51,110 grant was awarded by the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York for the project, “Early Identification of Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults Living at Home.” The study focuses on adults aged 65+ who are served by select community programs in Syracuse neighborhoods with high concentrations of poverty and high proportions of older adults. Led by Dr. Maria T. Brown, assistant research professor in Falk College’s School of Social Work and faculty associate in Syracuse University’s Aging Studies Institute (ASI), project partners include ASI, the Onondaga County Office for Aging, SUNY Upstate’s Center of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease, Syracuse Community Connections, and the Central New York Citizens Aging Research and Action Network (CNY-CAN). 

"We are thrilled that the Health Foundation for Western and Central New York has chosen to fund this pilot project, which enables us to reach older adults who might not otherwise be diagnosed or receive needed supports,” says Dr. Brown. “We are fortunate to be partnering with agencies that are embedded in the local community and familiar with the issues faced by older African Americans in that community, and to have members of the community whose lives have been touched by dementia or dementia caregiving on our project team.” 

Syracuse University’s Aging Studies Institute is a collaborative initiative of the Maxwell School of Citizenship & Public Affairs and the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. 

Read the full article here: "Maria Brown leads Aging Studies Institute’s community collaboration to benefit older adults with cognitive decline."