Past CQMI Events

The Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry supports events that provide research methodology training and education to faculty and students.

For more guidance and related resources on data-collection techniques and analytic methods training, or for information on data management and research transparency events, visit the QDR guidance and resource page https://qdr.syr.edu/guidance/workshops.

If you have an idea for a workshop or event, please contact Christiane Pagé.

October 19, 2018: Introduction to ATLAS.ti (v7)

Atlas.ti October 19,2018Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Professor of International Relations, Robert Rubinstein taught the basics of ATLAS.ti, a Computer Assisted Qualitative Data AnalysiS (or CAQDAS) application for multi-method and qualitative data management and analysis. Training participants either discovered for or expanded their knowledge of this powerful tool. ATLAS.ti is used to facilitate qualitative data collection and analysis, and management -- whether text or multi-media, across multiple documents, with linking, visualization, tracking codes and more.

For those that are interested in using ATLAS.ti for current or future projects, the Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry (CQMI) holds five ATLAS.ti (v7) licenses that can be used remotely from any computer. For instructions, please visit our Remote Lab at CQMI page

August 30- September 2, 2018: APSA Annual Meeting: Democracy and Its Discontents 

The Organized Section on Qualitative and Multi-Method Research seeks to promote research and training focused on the several branches of methodology associated with the qualitative tradition, broadly defined. The section also strives for an integrated understanding of these diverse methods and of their relationship to other branches of methodology, including quantitative methods. Please visit our APSA section for more details. 

August 29, 2018: Technical Solutions to Advance Evaluation and Replication in the Social Sciences: What’s New, What's Next

The workshop is the fourth in a series on "Developing and Implementing Data Policies: Conversations Between Journals and Data Repositories." The series is designed to promote discussion among social science journal editors, personnel from data repositories, data librarians, and other relevant constituencies about current approaches to data citation, management, and archiving.

June 18-29, 2018: The Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research (IQMR)

The institute seeks to enable participants to create and critique methodologically sophisticated qualitative research designs, including case studies, tests of necessity or sufficiency, and narrative or interpretive work. It explores the techniques, uses, strengths, and limitations of these methods, while emphasizing their relationships with alternative approaches.

May 21, 2018: "Protecting People, Sharing Data" Data Sharing and Human Participant Challenges in the Social Sciences

Institutional Research Board (IRB) are charged with helping social scientists conduct research in ways that will protect their human subjects from harm. In that role, IRBs sometimes encourage scholars to withhold – or even destroy – their research data in an effort to prevent even minimal risks of disclosure of private information. As interest in data sharing and research transparency has grown, IRBs and other institutions in the social science ecosystem – in particular funding organizations and academic journals – have engaged in rich discussions about how to continue protecting research participants while simultaneously making academic research more open.

February 22- 23, 2018: Annotation for Transparent Inquiry (ATI) #1

Workshop participants will discuss their experiences using ATI to annotate their articles, and reading articles that have been annotated using ATI. The goal of the workshops is to evaluate all aspects of ATI, identifying the ways in which it enhances scholarship and the challenges employing it presents, and considering how the ATI approach and technology can be further developed. The first workshop focused on articles based on qualitative evidence that were recently published, or are forthcoming, in an academic journal, and that authors retrospectively annotated using ATI. 

November 14, 2017: Grad Research Skills Series- Research Transparency and Data Management: Principles and Practices

Colin Elman, Director of the Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry and Qualitative Data Repository, and Sebastian Karcher, Associate Director of the Qualitative Data Repository, led the workshop by providing a short overview over recent debates around research transparency, focusing on the theoretical and practical justifications for transparency and data sharing. As the workshop continued it provided hands-on advice on how to conduct transparent research, focusing on data management practices that facilitate transparent research with a particular focus on data management planning in the social sciences. Other topics included writing effective data management plans, working with IRBs, best practices for organizing and storing files, and sharing data.

October 20, 2017: Introduction to ATLAS.ti (v7)

Students learning Atlas.ti software in a computer lab

Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Professor of International Relations, Robert Rubinstein taught the basics of ATLAS.ti, a Computer Assisted Qualitative Data AnalysiS (or CAQDAS) application for multi-method and qualitative data management and analysis. Training partipants either discovered for or expanded their knowledge of this powerful tool. ATLAS.ti is used to facilitate qualitative data collection and analysis, and management -- whether text or multi-media, across multiple documents, with linking, visualization, tracking codes and more.

For those that are interested in using ATLAS.ti for current or future projects, the Center for Qualitative and Multi-Method Inquiry (CQMI) holds five ATLAS.ti (v7) licenses that can be used remotely from any computer. For instructions, please visit our Remote Lab at CQMI page.

September 28, 2017: Teaching Qualitative Data Management Webinar

QDR experts led a webinar, as part of IASSIST's Professional Development series, on social science data management planning (DMP) with a special focus on teaching. More specifically, the management of qualitative data, for example, human participant protections and intellectual property concerns in the context of data sharing; data storage and backups from a field site abroad were addressed. The webinar included practical advice on managing qualitative data, as well as suggestions for exercises and lessons learned during QDR’s own instruction sessions.

September 15, 2017: Protecting People, Sharing Data Workshop

Members of the data repository and IRB communities gathered in New York City to discuss social science research. Workshop participants explained their thoughts and opinions on strategies that are expanding the potential for the ethical sharing of data generated through interacting with human participants. The discussions were used to formulate better practices with regard to the promise and praxis of data sharing.

Protecting People, Sharing Data Agenda

August 30, 2017: Data Under Constraint Workshop

Data Under Constraint was the third workshop in the Data-PASS series "Developing and Implementing Data Policies: Conversations Between Journals and Data Repositories." The series was designed to promote discussion among social science journal editors, personnel from data repositories, data librarians, and other relevant constituencies about current approaches to data citation, management, and archiving. In this workshop, the discussion focused on the editors and authors dealing with data that are under constraint – e.g., data that were generated through interaction with human participants, are classified, are under copyright, or have some other proprietary content. Authors of course must comply with relevant agreements they signed, ethical commitments they made, and applicable laws. Therefore, participants shared opinions and strategies on how journal editors could facilitate transparency under these conditions, and how much transparency they should encourage.

Data Under Constraint Agenda

March 23, 2017: CQMI Open House

The Open House invited university community members to learn about the center's collaborations, innovations in annotation technologies, and other resources available to faculty, staff, and students through CQMI. The Open House featured services and advances in data publishing, reuse, and policy resources through the Qualitative Data Repository; data management planning consultancy and webinars; innovative bibliographic resources, teaching modules, syllabi resources; access to computer assisted qualitative data analysis applications; the two Cambridge book series, Strategies for Social Inquiry and Methods for Social Inquiry; and, finally, training opportunities and workshops.