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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Latin America & the Caribbean

Schmeller discusses how the poinsettia came to the US in Washington Post

Mark Schmeller discusses how the 'Christmas Flower,' poinsettia came from Mexico to the United States.
January 8, 2020

Lovely quoted in Quartz article on USMCA

"One way to get a trade agreement passed is just to throw out free trade," says Mary Lovely, professor emerita of economics, about the Trump administration's trade policies, in a Quartz article.
December 20, 2019

Lovely speaks with NY Times, PBS, Washington Post about USMCA trade deal

"Clearly, the U.S. is trying to gain advantage in the agreement, and we did. We were able to squeeze some stuff out," says Mary Lovely, professor of economics. We "got an agreement that was basically the NAFTA agreement with some updating."

December 13, 2019

McDowell discusses history of the Washington Consensus on World Politics Review podcast

Daniel McDowell, associate professor of political science, was a guest on World Politics Review's latest Trend Lines podcast where he discussed the history of the Washington Consensus and why it continues to spark controversy around the world 30 years after the term was coined.
December 5, 2019

McCormick discusses Mexico, drug cartels in Bloomberg, Reuters

According to Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador and Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard are anticipated to resist and challenge the designation of Mexican cartels as terrorist groups by the United States.

December 3, 2019

Armstrong and collaborators author paper, win grant for excavation

Douglas Armstrong, professor and chair of anthropology, co-authored “Where Strangers Met: Evidence for Early Commerce at LaSoye Point, Dominica,” published last month in the journal Antiquity. The article is based on preliminary research conducted during 2018 at the LaSoye Point archaeological site on the east coast of Dominica, funded by a Northwestern University Research Grant.
November 25, 2019

McCormick discusses the violence in Mexico with CNN, Washington Post

A whole series of sort of mid-tier and lower level and smaller kind of up-and-coming, wannabe cartels are trying to set up shop in this terrain," says Gladys McCormick, associate professor of history and Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations. "They're striking deals with each other, with the big players."

November 11, 2019

Armstrong, Singleton cited in Science article on Caribbean excavation

Doug Armstrong and Theresa Singleton, both professors of anthropology, were interviewed for the Science article "Caribbean excavation offers intimate look at the lives of enslaved Africans." They shared insight from their own research on plantation slavery in the Caribbean. Maxwell alum Mark Hauser '98 MA (Anth)/'01 PhD (Anth) was also mentioned in the article.
November 8, 2019

McCormick speaks with Boston Herald, Bloomberg about cartel violence in Mexico

On Monday, nine members of a Mormon family, all US citizens, were killed in northern Mexico in an apparent attack by drug cartels. "The level of violence is brutal," Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations, told the Boston Herald
November 7, 2019

McCormick discusses recent violence in Mexico in Yucatan Times

Gladys McCormick, associate professor of history and Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations, says Thursday’s apparent capitulation to the Sinaloa Cartel was "sending a loud message to other organized crime networks…that if they show up with enough firepower to a fight, they will win and get their way because the government does not have the wherewithal to fight back."

November 4, 2019

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