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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: United States

Midcareer Students from Mexico Converge on DC to Explore US Political Systems and Policymaking

February 7, 2023

The program, which ran Jan. 23-27, was titled “U.S. Government and Politics: Policy and Decision Making” and offered participants an overview of U.S. political institutions, elections and federal systems; and touched on some of the most fractious issues facing U.S. policymakers today, including guns, immigration and the role of media.

Williams Reacts to the US Deployment of Tanks to Ukraine in Atlantic Council Article

February 6, 2023

"The decision of Germany to allow allies to send Leopard 2 tanks to Ukraine, as well as Berlin dispatching its own bilateral donation, is a significant symbol of allied commitment to Ukraine, but the implications of this move should not be exaggerated," says Michael Williams, associate professor of public administration and international affairs.

Gueorguiev Talks to NewsRadio 570 WSYR About the Chinese Spy Balloon, Impact on US-China Relations

February 6, 2023

"A bizarre situation with this balloon, in particular, is best understood as an attempt to kind of clarify what the terms of engagement are," says Dimitar Gueorguiev, associate professor of political science. "And what you’ve seen over the past couple of days is that surveillance aircraft at a certain level of altitude are now probably more likely to happen and are more at risk of being shot dow," he says.

Reeher Quoted in Governing Article on New York Gov. Kathy Hochul

February 3, 2023

The governor of New York possesses too much formal power to think about writing her off, says Grant Reeher, director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute. “She has an enormous amount of power in the budget,” he says, “and that’s the thing that’s coming up next.”

Radcliffe Discusses a Possible Return of Trump to the Presidency in The Hill

February 2, 2023

"If Trump, unable to accept losing, ignored the available evidence confirming the election’s integrity and really believed it was fraudulent, then his dearth of intellectual honesty renders him cognitively incompetent to hold the most powerful office in the world," says Dana Radcliffe, adjunct professor of public administration and international affairs.

On Tragedy’s Anniversary, Former NASA Leader Sean O’Keefe Reflects on the ‘Price of Diligence’

January 31, 2023

O’Keefe, a Maxwell School alumnus and Syracuse University Professor, was at the helm 20 years ago when Columbia broke apart while returning from a space research mission. 

Williams Discusses NATO’s DIANA Initiative with DefenseScoop

January 27, 2023

DIANA [Defence Innovation Accelerator for the North-Atlantic] could prove key to facilitating interoperability and a more level playing field between the nations—in emerging tech areas and traditional ones that are rapidly evolving, says Michael Williams, associate professor of public administration and international affairs.

Benanav Discusses Latest Tech Company Layoffs in TIME Article

January 23, 2023

“When interest rates were very low, companies basically had endless money—and investors were telling them to focus on growth, not profitability,” says Aaron Benanav, assistant professor of sociology. “But because interest rates are rising, there’s a shift from big investors to say, ‘No, now you really have to focus on profitability.’ And the big way to do that is through cuts.”

Gadarian Quoted in Christian Science Monitor Piece on Trump’s Political Future

January 19, 2023

“Trump starts off with a huge advantage in terms of name recognition and money in the bank—not his own money, but money from 2020 and money that he’s raising now,” says Shana Kushner Gadarian, professor and chair of political science. “So there is absolutely the case that he could be the nominee.”

See related: Government, United States

Thompson Talks to WRVO About the Scrutiny Surrounding Rep. George Santos

January 18, 2023

"If people decide that they will vote for somebody, regardless of what they may have done in their past, that's one thing," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science. "But if they vote under the misconception that somebody is what they say they are and then they find out later when it's too late that [it] is wrong. That's a very different situation."

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