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Maxwell / Department of History
  • Department of History

    Understanding history — the record of what people have thought, said, and done — is essential in understanding the world of today. Undergraduate and graduate students explore not only events of the past, but their meaning and implications for our own lives.

    For undergraduates, the department focuses on the broad relevance of history to a variety of careers — given the discipline’s emphasis on research, writing, and critical thinking. All students complete an original research project, either through the required senior research seminar or the BA with Distinction. Our active chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the history honor society, plans field trips and hosts graduate school and career workshops. Undergraduate majors have gone on to careers in law, politics, education, journalism, business, and medicine.

    Our graduate program is characterized by close intellectual and working relationships between students and faculty. Recent graduates have received appointments on college and university faculties, in libraries and archives, and in federal and state government agencies.

    The department includes 25 current and 11 emeritus faculty members, and many have received national and international recognition for their work. The faculty includes historians of the United States, Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, and the Ancient World.  In addition to geographic and chronological focuses, our colleagues teach in fields such as political, social, military, and cultural history, with particular interest in political violence, empire, religion, law, women, gender and sexuality, labor, race and ethnicity, and intellectual history.

    The History Department is one of the oldest departments in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University, having granted its first Ph.D. in 1883. 

  • History News

    Khalil weighs in on end of Israel PM Netanyahu's career in USA Today

    Israel's parliament cast a historic vote on Sunday that ended Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister and ushered in a "change coalition" that includes hardline factions, centrists and an Arab party, the first ever in an Israeli government. "It is a watershed moment," says Osamah Khalil. It may be a "Nixon-goes-to-China" pivot in Israeli politics—making it easier for future Israeli politicians to join forces with Arab parties after the hardline Bennett took that first step, he adds. Read more in the USA Today article, "'Watershed moment': Netanyahu’s fate on the line as Israel prepares for historic vote." Khalil was also quoted in the USA Today article, "Who is Naftali Bennett, Israel’s next prime minister if Benjamin Netanyahu is ousted?"

     

    Lasch-Quinn explores useful philosophy of Bridgerton in Zócalo

    In her piece published in Zócalo, "Can 'Bridgerton' Teach Us How to Live?," Professor Elisabeth Lasch-Quinn looks at whether the "voguish Netflix show that also carries strong resonances from the philosophical past" can help us learn how to live. "Even if renewed interest in ancient philosophies of living has reappeared on the horizon, this does not mean new references or allusions resemble anything more than bits and pieces, no longer recognizably related to a conversation about how to live a morally good life," writes Lasch-Quinn. "While 'Bridgerton,' like many other expressions of all kinds, might refer vaguely to Epicureanism, anyone reading the ancient texts, or about them, will see the difference," she says.

     

    McCormick comments on violence ahead of Mexico elections in Al Jazeera

    There have been 34 candidates murdered nationwide in Mexico ahead of the June 6 legislative elections that will fill thousands of local seats and nearly half of the country’s governors. "There’s always been violence with elections and electoral cycles especially at the mayoral level where you really see things get heated, but this time it feels like it’s way more than ordinary," says Gladys McCormick. "It’s a testament of the influence of organized crime with these local elections trying to sway the institutions,” McCormick says. "Organized crime has infiltrated municipalities, law enforcement at the municipal levels,” she says. "This is working its way up." Read more in the Al Jazeera article, "Another candidate assassinated in Mexico ahead of June 6 vote."

     
  • Current Procedure for Submitting Undergraduate Forms 

    All Undergraduate Forms should be submitted to Christina Cleason for review. All summer office hours and meetings with students will be conducted remotely. 

    • Undergraduate Student Forms include: major/minor declarations, transfer credit petitions, petitions to faculty, independent study forms, etc.

    Director of Undergraduate Studies:

    Professor Albrecht Diem

    Office Coordinator: 
    Christina Cleason

    315-443-2210