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Maxwell School News and Commentary

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Thompson Discusses the Legacy of Far-Right Women’s Groups in the US on WORT 89.9FM

"There have been women involved for a long, long time. For example, there was a very active women’s branch of the Klu Klux Klan in the 1920s. And many of those women, but not all, had been members of the United Daughters of the Confederacy," says Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science.

July 27, 2023

McFate Offers Perspective on the NATO Summit and Ukrainian President Zelenskyy in USA Today Article

Sean McFate, adjunct professor in Maxwell's Washington programs, thinks Zelenskyy is in trouble. McFate says Zelenskyy kept pushing NATO countries for increasingly sophisticated weapons on the promise that Ukraine would have a decisive spring offensive. "When the offensive happened, it was summer and failing,'' he says.

July 25, 2023

Ueda-Ballmer Weighs In on Japan’s Mental Health Crisis, Gender Inequality in The Nation Article

“Suicide was always a men’s issue,” says Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs. During the pandemic, “suddenly, women’s suffering became visible.” For the first time, “the government was forced to confront an approach to suicide prevention that had previously focused exclusively on middle-aged men.” 

July 20, 2023

McDowell Discusses How Geoeconomics Impacts Central Bank Reserve Managers in OMFIF Article

"After 9/11, the U.S. Treasury recognised that global dollar dominance gave Washington control over the critical plumbing of global finance. A new breed of financial sanctions emerged which could precisely cut individual targets—terrorists, foreign government officials, state institutions, firms—off from the dollar system. ‘Smart’ financial sanctions revolutionised economic warfare," writes Daniel McDowell, associate professor of political science.

July 18, 2023

Research by Gallo-Cruz Cited in Salon Article on the Human Costs of Global Warming

Citing the work of organizations like Global Witness in conflict zones worldwide, Selina Gallo-Cruz, associate professor of sociology, points out that a significant part of the violence on this planet comes from the North's "extraction of natural resources through mining or deforestation—palm oil plantations are a big one—and mega-, mega-agricultural projects," all of which lead to "outbreaks of very violent conflict."

July 18, 2023

Campbell Piece on US Military, White Supremacy and Affirmative Action Published in CounterPunch

"This contradiction of diminishing equity in access to higher education while maintaining the recruitment of non-whites to fight to defend the system of white racism is a contradiction that is coming to the fore in the United States," writes Horace Campbell, professor of political science.
July 17, 2023

Banks Comments on Military Vehicles in Urban Areas, Rumors of Martial Law in Military Times

“What people are seeing now is what people have seen every summer for as long as I’ve been alive,” says William Banks, professor emeritus of public administration and international affairs. “Folks are taking their summer National Guard duty right now and riding convoys to wherever they’re going to be. For many of us, it’s a regular scene in the summer on the highways.”

July 15, 2023

Murrett Quoted in Newsweek Article on Ukraine Retaking the City of Bakhmut

"It is just a matter of time until Ukrainian forces overrun Bakhmut, as reflected in advances already made by their forces in key areas surrounding the city," says Vice Adm. Robert Murrett (Ret.), professor of practice of public administration and international affairs.

July 14, 2023

Keck Discusses the Conservative Supermajority of the US Supreme Court in Al Jazeera Article

The “dominant theme” of the court’s recent term is that the bench remains staunchly conservative. Over the last two years, the conservative supermajority has overseen “multiple, rapid” shifts in the law that appear “ideologically driven,” says Thomas Keck, professor of political science.

July 13, 2023

See related: SCOTUS, United States

Yingyi Ma Speaks to The World About Declining Number of Chinese Students Studying at US Universities

Yingyi Ma, professor of sociology, says that around 2018-2019, American universities began to see a slight decrease in the number of Chinese students. “And then the pandemic hit,” Ma says. “And with the rising geopolitical tensions between the U.S. and China...[it] made Chinese students hesitate to come to the United States to study.”

July 11, 2023

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