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In the News: Emily Thorson

Emily Thorson Receives Moynihan Award for Teaching and Research

The assistant professor of political science will make remarks at the Maxwell School Graduate Convocation on May 10.

April 29, 2024

See related: Awards & Honors

Thorson Explores Causes of Public Policy Misperceptions in New Book

Emily Thorson

Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, recently published “The Invented State: Policy Misperceptions in the American Public” (Oxford University Press, 2024).

March 26, 2024

Emily Thorson Talks to KQED About Policy Misperceptions

"The more politicized a misperception is, the more it's tied up with someone's party identity, the more likely it is to be a product of people's political attitudes rather than something that affects those attitudes," says Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science.

March 15, 2024

Thorson Research Examines Echo Chambers and Political Attitudes on Social Media

Entitled “Like-minded Sources on Facebook Are Prevalent but Not Polarizing” and co-authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Thorson, this groundbreaking research published in Nature uses an on-platform experiment to examine what happens when Facebook users see dramatically less content from people who share their political leanings.

August 1, 2023

Like-Minded Sources on Facebook Are Prevalent but Not Polarizing

Brendan Nyhan, Jaime Settle, Emily Thorson, Magdalena Wojcieszak, et al.

"Like-minded sources on Facebook are prevalent but not polarizing," co-authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Emily Thorson, was published in Nature. The study is focused on the prevalence and effects of "echo chambers" on social media.

July 27, 2023

New Article by Abdelaaty and Thorson Explores the Prevalence of Misperceptions About Refugee Policy

Lamis Abdelaaty, Emily Thorson

"Misperceptions about Refugee Policy," co-authored by political science professors Lamis Abdelaaty and Emily Thorson, was published in American Political Science Review.

October 20, 2022

See related: Refugees, United States

Thorson Quoted in New York Times Piece on Political Misinformation

Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, says that email helped lies that the 2020 election was rigged gain traction. Read more in the New York Times article, "Now in Your Inbox: Political Misinformation."
December 21, 2021

See related: Elections, United States

Thorson quoted in National Geographic article on conspiracy theories

Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, was quoted in the National Geographic article, "Why people latch on to conspiracy theories, according to science." 
January 11, 2021

Thorson provides key election takeaways in Washington Post article

Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, and her co-author write about their takeaways from the 2020 Presidential elections, including the long-lasting impact of high voter turnout, the importance of candidate attributes even amidst partisan polarization, and the continued significance of survey research in understanding voting patterns and voter behavior.

November 9, 2020

Thorson quoted in CT Mirror article on Connecticut's tax myth

“Misconceptions about a particular policy, these are pretty common,” says Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, about falsehoods about policies for an article for the CT Mirror.

November 22, 2019

Thorson discusses belief echoes on WCNY's Capitol Pressroom

"Corrections of misinformation are constantly being amplified," says Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science. People are trying to do something good by correcting the misinformation but in the process they're "pushing it out to more people and potentially causing more belief echoes to arise."

June 11, 2019

Research by Emily Thorson cited in Forbes article on misinformation

Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, defines "belief echoes" as "effects on attitudes that persist even when you know that a piece of information is false."

May 22, 2019

Thorson weighs in on study of uncivil online discourse in The Atlantic

"I’d argue that much of the dysfunction we see in online interactions is just a symptom of much larger and older social problems, including but not limited to racism and misogyny," says Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science.

April 8, 2019

Thorson discusses how partisanship affects belief of facts with PBS

According to Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, negative misinformation about a politician of an opposing party is hard to shake, even after people learn that the original story was false.

April 1, 2019

Thorson weighs in on the issue of sharing fake news in PBS article

"Most people are not being inundated with fake news," says Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science. "That is not to say that this isn’t a problem, but I don’t think this is the magnitude of a problem that people often think it is."

January 25, 2019

Thorson discusses how Trump responds to difficult questions on NPR

"My sense is that he's relying on some stock phrases that he pulls out again and again, especially when he's called on to make a statement about an issue that perhaps he hasn't done a lot of research on or doesn't have a lot of information on," says Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science. 

October 16, 2018

Thorson weighs in on Trump attacks, NFL ratings in USA Today

According to Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, it's difficult to separate non-football issues—such as politics, concussions, cord-cutting and other unknown factors—from the events on the field.

October 9, 2018

Thorson cited in Pacific Standard article on political misconceptions

Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, found that relatively simple corrections could reduce some misperceptions by as much as 20 percentage points or more.

August 15, 2018

Thorson paper on fight against fake news published in Science

David Lazer, Matthew Baum, Yochai Benkler, Adam Berinsky, Kelly Greenhill, Filippo Menczer, Miriam Metzger, Brendan Nyhan, Gordon Pennycook, David Rothschild, Michael Schudson, Steven Sloman, Cass Sunstein, Emily Thorson, Duncan Watts & Jonathan Zittrain
Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, and co-authors call for a coordinated investigation into the underlying social, psychological and technological forces behind fake news to counteract the phenomenon's negative influence on society.
March 9, 2018

See related: Civil Rights

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