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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Allport Speaks with NewsNation, WGN Radio About Prince Harry’s New Book

January 13, 2023

"Harry seems to, for good reasons or bad, rightly or wrongly, he seems to have an enormous amount of grievances and he’s not being shy about saying them," says Alan Allport, professor of history.

See related: Europe, Media & Journalism

Maxwell Students, Faculty Among SOURCE and Honors Grant Recipients

January 13, 2023

Eleven Maxwell School students have been awarded grants from the Syracuse Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Engagement (SOURCE) and the Renée Crown University Honors Program. The awards provide up to $7,500 in support for original undergraduate research projects.

In Memoriam: Life Trustee, Maxwell Alumnus and Distinguished Professor Emeritus Walter Broadnax

January 12, 2023

Public service isn’t about something you do today and then you’re done. It’s about improving our society, improving the world…for the people that live in it.” Words attributed to Walter Broadnax G’75 that defined the way he approached life, education, work and volunteer service. The esteemed Syracuse University alumnus, professor, trustee and benefactor passed away on Dec. 2, 2022, at the age of 78.

See related: In Memoriam

Barton Piece on the Problem with Primaries Published in American Purpose

January 12, 2023

"The Problem with Primaries," written by Richard Barton, assistant teaching professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in American Purpose. "To free political parties from fringe candidates, we need to eliminate primaries that favor extremes," says Barton.

Baobao Zhang Joins First Cohort of AI2050 Early Career Fellows

January 11, 2023

Zhang, assistant professor of political science, has received up to $200K to research the role of citizens in the governance of artificial intelligence systems. 

Purser Talks to ABC News About the Nurse Strike in New York City

January 11, 2023

"Nurses are really bargaining for the collective good. They are putting, first and foremost, patients' safety above all else and that was the breaking point—they've been working under less-than-ideal conditions that jeopardized the safety of patients," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. 

Heflin Discusses Seniors’ Use of Food Benefits, Impact on Memory Decline in Neurology Today Article

January 11, 2023

"Screening for food insecurity can at least provide the clinician some sense of the risks their patients might be facing and their potential negative health consequences," says Colleen Heflin, professor of public administration and international affairs.

Gadarian’s “Pandemic Politics” Reviewed by Foreign Affairs

January 10, 2023

"Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID" (Princeton University Press, 2022), co-authored by Professor and Chair of Political Science Shana Kushner Gadarian, was reviewed in Foreign Affairs. "Their book is a sophisticated study, based on voluminous data, of U.S. politics as revealed by the strains and stresses of the pandemic," writes Jessica T. Mathews. 

Koch Article on Arizona Depleting its Groundwater Supply Published in New York Times

January 10, 2023

“Pumping groundwater in Arizona remains largely unregulated,” writes Natalie Koch, professor of geography. “It’s this legal failing that, in part, allows the Saudi company to draw unlimited amounts of water to grow an alfalfa crop that feeds dairy cows 8,000 miles away.”

Murrett Quoted in Newsweek Article on US Providing Aid to Ukraine

January 9, 2023

"If the U.S. had not worked with our allies and provided substantial military, economic and humanitarian aid to Ukraine, we would be facing a wide range of strategic threats in Europe and elsewhere," Robert Murrett, professor of practice of public administration and international affairs, tells Newsweek.

See related: Diplomacy, Russia, Ukraine

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