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Maxwell School Events Calendar

  • The Archaeology of Eighteenth Century Historic Households in Central New York

    Maxwell Hall, 204

    The Historic Households of Central New York project focuses on gaining a deeper understanding of the Indigenous and white settler colonialist populations moving into this region following the Revolutionary War through geophysical survey and small-scale excavations of homesteads identified through historic markers. we examine domestic spaces and daily life as the locus for the creation of new routines, relationships, and identities as people adjusted to life in a new landscape. These contexts are also useful for assessing the impacts people had on the region, including the establishment of villages and educational institutions that persist today.

  • David Robinson: Community Input in the Design of Algorithms

    Eggers Hall, 220

    Author David Robinson will join ASPI faculty members Johannes Himmelreich and Baobao Zhang for a discussion about community input in the design of algorithms.

  • CPR Seminar Series: Trevon Logan

    Virtual

    Trevon Logan (Ohio State University) will present “Competition and Discrimination in Public Accommodations: Evidence from the Green Books” as part of the CPR Seminar Series.

  • Opportunities for Research at the Cornell Federal Statistical Research Data Center

    Eggers Hall, 426

    Dr. Nichole Szembrot and Professor Zhuan Pei will discuss "Opportunities for Research at the Cornell Federal Statistical Research Data Center."

  • Funding at the Graduate Level: Understanding the Process and Navigating Resources

    Virtual

    Join the Maxwell School's Associate Director of Admission & Financial Aid to get an orientation to the financial aid and scholarship process. We will focus broadly on describing the different types of funding options available and how to navigate relevant resources.

  • Maxwell School - Executive Master's Programs Virtual Information Session

    Virtual

    This virtual information session gives an overview of the executive professional master’s programs offered by the Department of Public Administration and International Affairs and is ideal for midcareer professionals.

  • A Stamp on the Seafloor/Un Sello en el Fondo del Mar

    Maxwell Hall, 204

    In July 2017, Ruben Santana died in a spearfishing accident off the coast of Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic. This short ethnographic film chronicles his life and the events of his death through the voices of his colleagues, for whom Ruben was deeply loved.

  • M.A. in International Relations: A Curriculum Overview

    Virtual

    Join M.A. (IR) Program Director Michael Williams and associate director of admission & financial aid to get an in depth look at the master of arts in international relations curriculum, benefits and outcomes.

  • Syracuse-Chicago Webinar Series on Property Tax Administration and Design: Yanling Mayer

    Virtual

    Yanling Mayer (CoreLogic, Inc.) will discuss "Appraisal overvaluation: Evidence of price adjustment bias in sales comparisons."

  • State of Democracy Lecture on The State of Congress: Looking Toward the Mid-Terms

    Maxwell Hall, Auditorium

    State of Democracy Lecture with Sarah Binder, professor of political science at George Washington University and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution, who specializes in Congress and legislative politics. Dr. Binder will discuss, "The State of Congress: Looking Toward the Mid-Terms."

  • Master of Public Administration: A Curriculum Overview

    Virtual

    Join the Chair of the Department of Public Administration & International Affairs, Dr. Colleen Heflin, and the Associate Director of Admission & Financial Aid for an in depth look at the Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) curriculum, benefits and outcomes.

  • Applied Micro Seminar with Samuel Saltmarsh

    Eggers 112

    "Durable housing, vacancies, and blight: The effects of residential demolitions in Detroit"

  • A Doleful Place Indeed, for the Site of a Future City

    Maxwell Hall, 204

    Shifting power dynamics and infrastructural development within the city of Syracuse have long intertwined with geographic adjacency and the ability to control water resources. A population’s social and economic standing correlated to their proximity to areas subjected to flooding and other negative consequences of a water-rich landscape.

  • What's at Stake for US Climate Goals?

    Virtual

    What's at Stake for US Climate Goals?: Prospects in the Wake of WV v EPA and the Inflation Reduction Act

  • Syracuse-Chicago Webinar Series on Property Tax Administration and Design: Hans Koster

    Virtual

    Hans Koster (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam) will discuss "How do Households Value the Future? Evidence from Property Taxes."

  • Misremembered Massacre: Simon Pokagon’s Indigenous Account of the Battle of Fort Dearborn

    Maxwell Hall, 204B

    The Battle of Fort Dearborn is commonly portrayed as a foundational event in the early history of Chicago. Typical historical narratives describe the battle as a massacre of innocent white settlers by blood thirsty Potawatomi warriors.

  • M.A. in Public Diplomacy & Global Communications: A Curriculum Overview

    Virtual

    Learn more about the M.A. in Public Diplomacy & Global Communications from the #1-ranked school of public affairs and renowned S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications.

  • CPR Seminar Series: Ying Shi

    Eggers Hall, 060

    Ying Shi (Syracuse University) will present “Minority Political Participation, the Voting Rights Act, and the Aftermath of Shelby County v. Holder” as part of the CPR Seminar Series.

  • Applied Micro Seminar with Zhe He

    Eggers 112

    “Partial Identification of the Marginal Treatment Effect with an Invalid Discrete Instrument”

  • The archaeological record of the African diaspora in Brazil

    Maxwell Hall, 204

    Archaeological research carried out in slave quarters in Brazil in the last twenty years has revealed a large and diversified assortment of material items, including ceramic vessels, ornaments, recycled items, and faunal remains. In this presentation, I will contrast these items with those found on African-American and African-Caribbean contexts.