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    With the support of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs, the Maxwell African Scholars Union promotes the scientific study of African societies and the continental African experience in the globalized world. Discover the richness of Masu_logo_smallthe continent with its cultural heritage and diversity, wealth of natural resources, tourist attractions and its intricate political systems.
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  • Moynihan News

    McCormick quoted in Al Jazeera article on use of spyware in Mexico

    A rights group has called on the Mexican government to suspend all use of surveillance spyware until robust and transparent regulations are put in place that respect human rights. The administration of President Lopez Obrador says previous Mexican governments purchased and used the spyware. "This is something that could potentially be good because it does lend validity to the accusations that Enrique Pena Nieto and the old guard of the political establishment are corrupt," says Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations. Read more in the Al Jazeera article, "Rights group calls for moratorium on the use of spyware in Mexico."

     

    Lovely talks to Bloomberg about Beijing relations with Europe, US

    Mary Lovely, professor of economics, discussed Beijing relations with Europe and the U.S. on 'Bloomberg Markets: China Open.' "I think that they [Europe] can have a very important role to play in lowering the temperature and starting to set the stage for us to find solutions and a way forward," Lovely says.

     

    Khalil speaks to SBG about Iran's president-elect Ebrahim Raisi

    The Biden administration has made clear that reestablishing the nuclear agreement with Iran is a top concern for his administration. Experts say that may be increasingly possible following the election of hardline leader Ebrahim Raisi but any negotiations beyond the original 2015 nuclear deal could prove difficult if not impossible under Iran's new hardline president. The election of Raisi was a "mixed bag" for President Biden, says Osamah Khalil. "In the short term, it will likely enable a renewed JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action). In the longer term, it will make it more difficult to have an expanded agreement or expanded relations with Iran," he says. Read more in the Sinclair Broadcast Group article, "Iran's new hardline president could complicate Biden's foreign policy agenda."

     

    Khalil weighs in on end of Israel PM Netanyahu's career in USA Today

    Israel's parliament cast a historic vote on Sunday that ended Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister and ushered in a "change coalition" that includes hardline factions, centrists and an Arab party, the first ever in an Israeli government. "It is a watershed moment," says Osamah Khalil. It may be a "Nixon-goes-to-China" pivot in Israeli politics—making it easier for future Israeli politicians to join forces with Arab parties after the hardline Bennett took that first step, he adds. Read more in the USA Today article, "'Watershed moment': Netanyahu’s fate on the line as Israel prepares for historic vote." Khalil was also quoted in the USA Today article, "Who is Naftali Bennett, Israel’s next prime minister if Benjamin Netanyahu is ousted?"

     

    Lovely discusses India's COVID crisis, US textile imports with NBC

    As the coronavirus pandemic tears across India, forcing garment factories to shut down or work at half capacity to stem new cases, retail suppliers are scrambling to move production to China. While India constitutes a smaller fraction of imports as compared to China, it still plays a significant role in certain sectors which makes it difficult to move supply chains outside the country, says Professor Mary Lovely. "If India dropped off the face of the world, where you would notice an impact is certainly in manufactured goods, textile and mill products and things like cloth and towels," she says. "You don't just move supply chains. They’re not like pins on a map." Read more in the NBC News article, "India's COVID crisis has ripple effects for garment industry worldwide."

     
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Maxwell African Scholars Union
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