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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: State & Local

Maxwell Students Take Honors in City of Syracuse’s Inaugural Open Data Day

Encouraged by Associate Professor Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, the group of mostly MPA students used public data to address city transportation challenges.

January 10, 2024

Examining the Smart City Generational Model: Conceptualizations, Implementations, and Infrastructure

Austin Zwick, Zachary Spicer

"Examining the Smart City Generational Model: Conceptualizations, Implementations, and Infrastructure Canada's Smart City Challenge," co-authored by Austin Zwick, assistant teaching professor of policy studies, was published in Urban Affairs Review.

January 8, 2024

Extreme Weather Events and Local Fiscal Responses: Evidence from US Counties

Qing Miao, Michael Abrigo, Yilin Hou, Yanjun (Penny) Liao

"Extreme Weather Events and Local Fiscal Responses: Evidence from U.S. Counties," co-authored by Yilin Hou, professor of public administration and international affairs, was published in Economics of Disasters and Climate Change.

November 20, 2023

Huber Discusses the Build Public Renewables Act in Public Power Review Articles

In his two-part essay on the Build Public Renewables Act (BPRA), Professor of Geography and the Environment Matthew Huber examines the labor question and assesses dubious campaign claims that BPRA is a climate victory.

November 13, 2023

Barton Article on Alaska’s Nonpartisan Primary System Published in Governing

"The state’s new election system, combining nonpartisan primaries and instant-runoff general election voting, makes elections more competitive and encourages cooperative governance," writes Richard Barton, assistant teaching professor of public administration and international affairs.

October 30, 2023

Montez Cited in Washington Post Article on the Impact of States’ Policies on Life Expectancy

The differences in state policies directly correlate to those years lost, said Jennifer Karas Montez, director of the Center for Aging and Policy Studies and author of several papers that describe the connection between politics and life expectancy.

October 17, 2023

Ekbia Comments on the Current State of AI Regulation by State Governments in Bloomberg Law

“Unfortunately, academics as much as many others, including Silicon Valley folks, are culpable for spreading this kind of fear and anxiety in the society,” says University Professor Hamid Ekbia. “Let’s stop for a second, take a deep breath, and see what is really possible in both directions, in terms of risks, but also in terms of the promises.”  

August 10, 2023

Banks Quoted in The Hill Article on Trump’s Indictments

“Going forward I think there’s almost no doubt he’s going to be indicted in Washington. And because he’s going to be indicted in Washington and the potential for a jury that would sit and judge him in Washington, his prospects for remaining free got a lot darker,” says William Banks, professor emeritus of public administration and international affairs.

July 29, 2023

Barton Article on Eliminating Partisan Primaries Published in The Fulcrum

"Given how partisan and ideologically extreme most politicians still are, are nonpartisan primaries really enough to save American democracy? While we’re already seeing improvements in the states that have them, the tide won’t fully change until a critical mass of politicians are freed from partisan primaries at the state and national level," writes Richard Barton, assistant teaching professor of policy studies and public administration and international affairs.

July 28, 2023

Jackson Joins WCNY Connected for a Panel Discussion on LGBTQIA+ Issues Facing New Yorkers

"What I think is the best mode is for the government to step back and to support community organizations who are often at the forefront of these conversations and are often populated by people who are directly impacted, and who are the very people who have the expertise because they are the people we are talking about," says Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science.

June 28, 2023

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