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Maxwell School News and Commentary

In the Washington Post, Griffiths Discusses Secessionist Movements

January 3, 2022
In the Washington Post article, “Secession might seem like the lesser of two evils. It’s also the less likely,” Ryan Griffiths, associate professor of political science, says, “In the long run, there will be another secessionist movement in the United States. It will just happen. No country is permanent. It will change. It will break apart in some way.”

Reeher Talks to Spectrum News about NY Governor's Race

December 23, 2021
According to Professor Grant Reeher, U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi is likely more of a threat to incumbent Kathy Hochul than New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams.

Lovely Discusses China and the World Trade Organization with R Street Institute

December 22, 2021
Professor Mary Lovely joined the R Street Institute for a panel discussion on economic issues and relations between the world’s two largest economies.

Tracking COVID’s Toll

December 21, 2021

Pandemic research by Maxwell faculty and students is shaping policy and perception on everything from aging to opioid addiction.

Thorson Quoted in New York Times Piece on Political Misinformation

December 21, 2021
Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, says that email helped lies that the 2020 election was rigged gain traction. Read more in the New York Times article, "Now in Your Inbox: Political Misinformation."

Alumni Spotlight: Joining the Global Conversation

December 20, 2021

Jen Proch ’21 M.A.I.R. took advantage of an internship with the Council of Europe and the Atlantis Program, which enables students to earn master’s degrees from both Maxwell and the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin. 

Jackson Reflects on Bell Hooks' Legacy in Washington Post

December 19, 2021
Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science, reflects on bell hooks’ legacy in the Washington Post's The Lily article, "Black women share what bell hooks taught them about feminism."

Murphy examines race and borders in the colonial Caribbean in new book

December 18, 2021
In her new book, "The Creole Archipelago: Race and Borders in the Colonial Caribbean" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Tessa Murphy, assistant professor of history, traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge connections that spanned the eastern Caribbean.

Anger, Despair and Seeds of Hope

December 17, 2021

Maxwell alumni wonder whether the changes they worked for in Afghanistan will endure after the ‘heartbreaking’ U.S. withdrawal.

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