Amy Lutz

Associate Professor, Sociology

Biography

Amy Lutz is an Associate Professor of Sociology and a Senior Research Associate in the Center for Policy Research. She conducts research on children of immigrants, race ethnicity, and educational inequalities. Professor Lutz is currently working on a project that examines the educational and early labor market outcomes among children of immigrants in France and the United States. She is also working on a collaborative project on the relationship between families and schools and the role of social class on educationally relevant parenting practices. Additionally, Amy is working on a project that aims to determine how different affirmative action contexts have affected different racial-ethnic groups’ enrollment and completion of degrees at selective colleges and universities. Amy received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Albany in 2002.

Select Publications

Books

Pamela R. Bennett, Amy Lutz and Lakshmi Jayaram. "Parenting in Privilege or Peril: How Social Inequality Enables or Derails the American Dream." New York: Teachers College Press. Forthcoming.

Publications

2020     Lutz, Amy, Pamela R. Bennett and Rebecca Wang. “State Bans on Affirmative Action and Talent Loss among Blacks and Latinos in the United States.” Ethnic Studies Review 43: 58-76.

2020     Lutz, Amy and Dalia Abdelhady. “Working-Class Children of Mexican Immigrants in Dallas, Texas.” City and Community 19: 310-314.

2019     Lutz, Amy, Pamela R. Bennett and Rebecca Wang. “How Affirmative Action Context Shapes Collegiate Outcomes at America’s Selective Colleges and Universities.” Journal of Law and Social Policy 31: 71-91. 


More Publications

Research Grants and Awards

Principal Investigator.  “Working and Teaching from Home in New York State amidst the Coronavirus Pandemic.” National Science Foundation. 2020-2022.

Principal Investigator. Access to Selective Colleges in the Pre- and Post-Grutter Eras Among Racial, Ethnic, and Immigrant Groups," with CO-PI Pamela Bennett (UMBC). Funded by the National Science Foundation. 2012-2017.