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Maxwell / Department of History
  • Department of History

    Understanding history — the record of what people have thought, said, and done — is essential in understanding the world of today. Undergraduate and graduate students explore not only events of the past, but their meaning and implications for our own lives.

    For undergraduates, the department focuses on the broad relevance of history to a variety of careers — given the discipline’s emphasis on research, writing, and critical thinking. All students complete an original research project, either through the required senior research seminar or the BA with Distinction. Our active chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, the history honor society, plans field trips and hosts graduate school and career workshops. Undergraduate majors have gone on to careers in law, politics, education, journalism, business, and medicine.

    Our graduate program is characterized by close intellectual and working relationships between students and faculty. Recent graduates have received appointments on college and university faculties, in libraries and archives, and in federal and state government agencies.

    The department includes 25 current and 11 emeritus faculty members, and many have received national and international recognition for their work. The faculty includes historians of the United States, Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, South Asia, East Asia, and the Ancient World.  In addition to geographic and chronological focuses, our colleagues teach in fields such as political, social, military, and cultural history, with particular interest in political violence, empire, religion, law, women, gender and sexuality, labor, race and ethnicity, and intellectual history.

    The History Department is one of the oldest departments in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University, having granted its first Ph.D. in 1883. 

  • History News

    Murphy examines race and borders in the colonial Caribbean in new book

    In her new book, "The Creole Archipelago: Race and Borders in the Colonial Caribbean" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Tessa Murphy, assistant professor of history, traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge connections that spanned the eastern Caribbean.

     

    Khalil weighs in on foreign perceptions of the US in Morning Consult

    Favorable views of the U.S. rose among adults in nine ally and partner states in Europe and Asia during the first year of the Biden administration, with adults in the same countries maintaining firmly negative views of China over the same period. "The Biden bump, if you will, is probably more about personality and rhetoric. The fact that he is not Donald Trump accounts for a large part of that swing,” says Osamah Khalil, associate professor of history and chair of international relations. Read more in the Morning Consult article, "America Is Experiencing a Biden Bump Abroad, but It’s What Allies Fear That Matters Most."

     

    Allport's Britain at Bay wins HWA 2021 Crown Award for nonfiction

    "Britain at Bay: The Epic Story of the Second World War: 1938-1941" (Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2020), written by Professor of History Alan Allport, won the Historical Writers' Association 2021 Crown Award for nonfiction. According to the judges, "It changed our perspective, not just on Britain in the Second World War but on British national identity and the way that we deploy history more generally."

     
  •  Submitting Undergraduate Forms 

    All Undergraduate Forms should be submitted to Christina Cleason for review. 

    • Undergraduate Student Forms include: major/minor declarations, transfer credit petitions, petitions to faculty, independent study forms, etc.

    Director of Undergraduate Studies:

    Professor Mark Schmeller 

    Office Coordinator: 
    Christina Cleason

    315-443-2210