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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: International Affairs

Jacobson discusses the removal of US troops from Afghanistan on MSNBC

April 15, 2021

"I just think that he [Biden] has been given, by his team, a false binary choice: either we stay indefinitely with a massive commitment, or we leave," says Mark Jacobson, assistant dean for Washington Programs who served in Afghanistan with both the Army and Navy reserves. "And there's a lot of areas in between, a lot of work we can do that is beyond that binary choice."

 

Murrett weighs in on the size of China's naval fleet in Military Times

April 13, 2021
When it comes to fleet size, Robert Murrett, professor of practice of public administration and international affairs, says that China’s fleet largely remains in its backyard, while a good number of the U.S. force is underway around the world, making a number-to-number assessment incomplete.

Taylor explores impact of Putin’s new constitution in Foreign Affairs

April 13, 2021
"Putin’s solution to the 2024 problem was for his own benefit, but it also was designed to reassure Russia’s political and economic elite. They were dreading a potentially treacherous succession crisis that might put their power, wealth, and freedom at risk," writes Brian Taylor, professor of political science. "Resetting Putin’s presidential clock does little for the Russian people, however."

Murrett talks to Fox News about Russia's Arctic build-up

April 8, 2021
"Russia is developing a series of weapons that are very concerning from the standpoint of the United States," says Vice Adm. Robert B. Murrett (Ret.), professor of practice of public administration and international affairs. "The Arctic is actually smaller and just a terrific shortcut whether you're in an aircraft, whether you're underneath the surface of the ocean, and also for intercontinental ballistic missiles, this goes back to the Cold War."

Williams discusses the US approach to warfare on History Hit podcast

March 24, 2021
Michael Williams, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, was a guest on History Hit's Warfare podcast for the episode titled "Liberalism and the American Way of War." 

McCormick talks to Associated Press, Bloomberg about the US-Mexico border crisis

March 24, 2021
A U.S. delegation discussed immigration and regional development in a series of meetings in Mexico on Tuesday at a time when the rising number of migrants arriving at their shared border has raised concerns in both countries.

McCormick discusses US-Mexico immigration in Al Jazeera article

March 15, 2021
Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations, says Mexico's President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador is likely to request more U.S. funding than under previous arrangements with Trump to respond to the situation.

Lovely speaks to South China Morning Post about the EU's new trade policy

February 22, 2021
"The new EU trade policy tries to strike a principled balance between the U.S. and China, with clear signals to both that it will set its own course," says Professor Mary Lovely. "Finding a way forward that is both 'open' and 'autonomous' will be difficult, however, as openness brings interdependence," she says.

Khalil discusses the Arab Spring after 10 years on PBS NewsHour

February 12, 2021
"I think it's tempting to think about the Arab Spring as a failure. But I think the reality is that it's really still under way," says Osamah Khalil, associate professor of history. "Many of those same issues that brought the protest to a head and the challenging of those—of the different Arab governments still exist." Watch the full PBS NewsHour interview, "Ten years after the Arab Spring, democracy remains elusive in Egypt." 

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