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Maxwell School News and Commentary

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Wilson Discusses Why Wildfire Smoke is No Longer Solely a West Coast Problem in The Hill

"Before this week, it was easy for those of us in the East to think that suffocating wildfire smoke was solely a West Coast problem. But no longer. The smoke clouding our skies, scratching our throats and watering our eyes shows we’re all Westerners now," writes Robert Wilson, associate professor of geography and the environment.

June 12, 2023

Harrington Meyer Quoted in Bloomberg Article on Grandparents and the Childcare Crisis

“For a lot of families, grandparent care is the gold standard,” says University Professor Madonna Harrington Meyer, who notes that grandparents are often far more flexible than other childminders; they’ll watch your kid for free, for long or short periods of time, on little notice. They will even do it when your child is sick. 

June 9, 2023

McFate Weighs In on North Korea’s Failed Military Reconnaissance Satellite Launch in The Independent

Sean McFate, adjunct professor in Maxwell's Washington programs, says the North's satellite launch is mostly for "domestic political consumption" and unlikely to have a substantial impact. "Kim’s autocracy is legitimized by the 'enduring threat' of the U.S., and this demonstration shows he’s fulfilling his social contract with North Koreans."

June 7, 2023

Huber Discusses His Book, “Climate Change as Class War” on Future Histories Podcast

"So if we can pair climate decarbonization with more increased secure access to people's basic material needs, you could start to build a much broader popular base," says Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment. 

June 7, 2023

Murrett Talks to the Daily Beast About North Korea’s Missile Tech Advances

“North Korea’s recent development and initial testing of a long-range solid-fuel ICBM does represent a significant step forward in its ongoing development of potentially nuclear-capable delivery vehicles,” says Vice Adm. Robert Murrett (Ret.), professor of practice of public administration and international affairs. 

June 6, 2023

Shi Article on Putting Teachers on School Boards Published in Education Next

Ying Shi, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, and John G. Singleton of the University of Rochester, investigated what happens when educators are elected to school boards. "Despite raising teachers’ salaries, electing an educator to a school board does not translate into improved outcomes for students and has negative impacts on charter schools."

June 5, 2023

Reeher Comments on How to Solve Gun Violence Issues in Alabama Reflector Article

Grant Reeher, professor of political science, says no single law will solve the issues of gun violence. “You have to think very specifically about it,” Reeher says. “There is no one blanket policy that is going to say, ‘OK, this is going to reduce gun violence and it is going to apply equally to everybody.’ You have to think of the pockets and where the risk is.”

June 5, 2023

McCormick Weighs In on Mexican President AMLO’s Seizure of Billionaire’s Rail Line in Bloomberg

Gladys McCormick, Jay and Debe Moskowitz Endowed Chair in Mexico-U.S. Relations, says Lopez Obrador’s recent actions reflect the “sort of populist demagogue persona that he’s carved out for himself,” and that it’s all been part of a perfect recipe “for him to be go out there in public and remind people that he is, above all, for Mexico.”

June 2, 2023

McDowell Quoted in DW Article on the Decline of the Dollar’s Dominance in the Middle East

"Statements are easy, action is more difficult," says Daniel McDowell, associate professor of political science. "For oil-producing states, like Saudi Arabia, these sorts of statements and agitations are also a way to get America's attention. Flirting with the Chinese may make American policymakers focus more attention on the interests of the Gulf states." 

June 1, 2023

Gadarian Speaks with WBUR About the Politicization of COVID-19 and Its Impact on Democracy

“It turns out that partisanship just swamped everything else as early as March of 2020," says Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science. 

May 26, 2023

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