Skip to content

Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Commentary

Reeher Discusses Trump’s Indictments, Primary Success in The Hill and Washington Examiner Articles

“We’re at a different point now because people know this about him. The question will be what new information about him that is going to be relevant to people’s decision is going to be imparted,” says Grant Reeher, director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute.

September 20, 2023

Heather Law Pezzarossi Quoted in New York Times Article on Washoe Basket Weaver Louisa Keyser

Heather Law Pezzarossi, assistant professor of anthropology, argues that our contemporary arguments over cultural appropriation are misapplied to Louisa Keyser’s baskets. “Authenticity is a completely Western, American fixation we’ve mapped onto this concept of indigeneity to make it part of an American past, not an American future,” she says.

September 20, 2023

Huber Weighs In on United Auto Workers Strike in The Hill

“The UAW…strike action is ultimately trying to realize one of the Biden Administration’s core policy goals and political selling points: you can have good, family-sustaining union jobs alongside climate action. The problem is the automakers see EV production as a way to trim labor costs and shift production to non-union plants,” says Matt Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

September 19, 2023

Benanav Talks to CNBC About AI and the Future of Work

“I think about academics having to write grants all the time,” says Aaron Benanav, assistant professor of sociology, as an example. Those can be formulaic and would take far less time with the help of a machine. In programming, it’s helping engineers “write up basic outlines of code or sometimes like whole sections of code,” he says. 

September 18, 2023

McFate Speaks with USA Today About the War in Ukraine

"Things are going nowhere for Ukraine," says Sean McFate, adjunct professor in Maxwell's Washington Programs. "Wars are no longer won like World War II by taking the enemy’s land, killing their troops and flying your flag over their capital."

September 16, 2023

Hammond Discusses New Book, “Placing Islam,” in UC Press Blog and in Jadaliyya Article

"One initial impetus for the book was my desire to bring geography’s concepts and insights into better conversation with topics in Middle East area studies," says Timur Hammond, assistant professor of geography and the environment. "Although over a decade has passed since I started research on this topic, expanding the disciplinary connections between geography and Middle East area studies continues to be a core goal."

September 15, 2023

Kurien Quoted in Texas Standard Article on Immigrant Churches in Diaspora Network, US Church Growth

Prema Kurien, professor of sociology, says there is a logical reason why immigrant groups exhibit higher rates of religiosity. “Immigration and relocation from a familiar context to something completely unfamiliar is a theologizing experience,” Kurien says. “It raises existential questions—things that people don’t think about when they are in their home country with a familiar community.”

September 14, 2023

Faricy Comments on the State of Negotiations on Funding the Government in Spectrum News Article

“There are enough moderate Republicans in the House, along with Democrats in the House, to pass a spending bill out of the House that they know the Senate Democrats, which control the Senate, would agree to,” says Chris Faricy, associate professor of political science. “But in doing that, you risk a backlash from the Freedom Caucus.”

September 13, 2023

Bendix Speaks to the Washington Post About the Maui Wildfires

Jacob Bendix, professor emeritus of geography and the environment, says the grasses provided “fine fuels that ignite easily” due to their high surface area-to-volume ratio, dense growth patterns and height.

September 12, 2023

Mallon Andrews Talks to Science News About Climate Change and the Color of Seawater

Some colors can affect divers’ physical and mental health, says Kyrstin Mallon Andrews, assistant professor of anthropology. For instance, because yellow water clouds the water’s surface, the fishermen must dive continually to see fish, an exhausting process. Yellow water also causes skin rashes and debilitating ear infections, along with “sort of generalized angst,” she says.

September 6, 2023

Explore by:

Communications and Media Relations Office
500 Maxwell Hall