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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Commentary

Mihm Speaks to FedScoop About Biden's Learning Management Agenda

January 7, 2022
On FedScoop's "The Daily Scoop" podcast, Chris Mihm, adjunct professor of public administration and international affairs and former managing director for strategic issues at the Government Accountability Office, explains what’s important about the learning agenda and the process of taking in comments on it.

Reeher Weighs in on Gov. Hochul's 2022 Strategy in Spectrum News Piece

January 4, 2022
“What I see her doing right now is pushing restrictions and regulations about as far as they can be pushed given the appetite of the people for them at this point,” says Professor Grant Reeher, director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute.

O'Keefe Talks to The Guardian About SpaceX's Latest Venture

January 4, 2022
The first orbital test launch of the largest and most powerful rocket ship ever to leave Earth—SpaceX’s towering Starship, from its Starbase headquarters in Texas—is seen by many as a pathway back to the moon for the first time in half a century.

See related: Space Exploration , Technology

Weschle Quoted in Sky News on Income of Members of Parliament

January 3, 2022
New analysis by Sky News found that former cabinet ministers who remain in parliament earn an average of £162,000 on top of their Member of Parliament (MP) salary from the private sector in their first year after leaving government. The fact that MPs gain rather than lose out financially from being in the Cabinet is supported by the findings of Simon Weschle, assistant professor of political science, who analyzed MPs earnings from 2010 - 2015.

In the Washington Post, Griffiths Discusses Secessionist Movements

January 3, 2022
In the Washington Post article, “Secession might seem like the lesser of two evils. It’s also the less likely,” Ryan Griffiths, associate professor of political science, says, “In the long run, there will be another secessionist movement in the United States. It will just happen. No country is permanent. It will change. It will break apart in some way.”

Lovely Discusses China and the World Trade Organization with R Street Institute

December 22, 2021
Professor Mary Lovely joined the R Street Institute for a panel discussion on economic issues and relations between the world’s two largest economies.

Thorson Quoted in New York Times Piece on Political Misinformation

December 21, 2021
Emily Thorson, assistant professor of political science, says that email helped lies that the 2020 election was rigged gain traction. Read more in the New York Times article, "Now in Your Inbox: Political Misinformation."

Jackson Reflects on Bell Hooks' Legacy in Washington Post

December 19, 2021
Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science, reflects on bell hooks’ legacy in the Washington Post's The Lily article, "Black women share what bell hooks taught them about feminism."

Herrold Piece on the Summit for Democracy Published in Foreign Policy

December 16, 2021
President Joe Biden recently held a virtual Summit for Democracy to amplify U.S. commitments to defend democracy. But what can the Biden administration realistically hope to achieve from the summit? Catherine Herrold, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, says, "A humbler approach is needed in which the United States creates a platform for dialogue about how to shift power to citizens rather than prescribing democracy templates." In their article "When Promoting Democracy, Less Is More," published in Foreign Policy, Herrold and co-author Aseem Prakash recommend three primary reforms.

See related: Democracy , Diplomacy

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