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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Electoral Democracy and Working-Age Mortality

Jennifer Karas Montez, Kent Jason Cheng, Jacob M. Grumbach

"Electoral Democracy and Working-Age Mortality," co-authored by University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and social science Ph.D. student Kent Cheng, was published in The Milbank Quarterly.

July 10, 2023

Ecologies of Mistrust: Fish, Fishermen, and the Multispecies Ethics of Ethnographic Authority

Kyrstin Mallon Andrews

"Ecologies of mistrust: Fish, fishermen, and the multispecies ethics of ethnographic authority," authored by Assistant Professor of Anthropology Kyrstin Mallon Andrews, was published in American Anthropologist.

July 10, 2023

Maria Zhu Awarded the 2023 Montonna Fund

The assistant professor of economics received the honor for her work teaching undergraduate students.

July 10, 2023

See related: Awards & Honors

Maxwell Student Megan Edenfeld Article on Securing International Airspace Published by US State Dept

"Illicitly proliferated Man-Portable Air Defense Systems (MANPADS) and Anti-Tank Guided Missiles, or All-purpose Tactical Guided Missiles (ATGMs), continue to pose risks to international skies," writes Maxwell student Megan Edenfeld. "With the safety of commercial and military aircraft at stake, securing airspace is a priority for the U.S. government and partner and Allied governments worldwide."

July 10, 2023

Taylor Discusses the Wagner Group, Russian President Putin with Business Insider, DW and Newsweek

Brian Taylor, professor of political science, says that the mutiny fallout has put Putin in a position he's neither familiar nor comfortable with—often using his pulpit to blast political enemies, both inside and outside of Moscow. "Now he's applying that very same language to one of his own guys, someone he elevated to a position of power and responsibility," Taylor says.

July 7, 2023

Azadeh Tajdar Joins Maxwell as Inaugural Cramer Family Professor of Practice in Community Impact

Seated in citizenship and civic engagement, the professorship was created with a generous gift by the Gerald and Daphna Cramer Foundation.

July 7, 2023

Silverstein Weighs In on America’s Religious Shift in New York Times Article

One of the main qualifications people seem to be looking for in their new spiritual communities is something that is less exclusionary than the denominations they were raised in. But it’s precisely the more “dogmatic” denominations and religious sects that are better able to keep adherents, says Merril Silverstein, professor of sociology.

July 5, 2023

See related: Religion, United States

Allport Discusses the Impact of Prince Harry’s Tabloid Lawsuit on the Royal Family

"He [Prince Harry] will be, I imagine, under a lot of pressure from the palace to try to tone things down. But on the other hand, he is pretty alienated from a lot of these folks and he may feel that since he's not actually a working royal anymore that he's entitled to say whatever he wishes," says Alan Allport, Dr. Walter Montgomery and Marian Gruber Professor of History.

June 30, 2023

See related: Europe, Law

In Memoriam: Life Trustee Allan D. Sutton ’55 BA (PSc)

Through his generosity to Syracuse University, he had a profound impact on the reputation of the Department of Philosophy and advanced the careers of some of the nation’s brightest philosophy scholars. Sutton passed away on May 31, 2023, in his home in Rancho Santa Fe, California, at the age of 90.

June 29, 2023

See related: Centennial, In Memoriam

McFate Speaks With NPR About the Repercussions of the Wagner Group's Rebellion in Russia

"The problem of private warfare is control and accountability. And you have very little of it, especially in a conflict zone. So right now, we have the problem—well, Putin has a problem, is he can give amnesty temporarily to Wagner Group and to Prigozhin," says Sean McFate, adjunct professor in Maxwell's Washington programs.

June 29, 2023

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