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Taylor Talks to the Associated Press, Wall Street Journal About Putin’s Fifth Term

“The war in Ukraine is central to his current political project, and I don’t see anything to suggest that that will change. And that affects everything else,” says Brian Taylor, professor of political science and director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

May 10, 2024

Huber Article on the Politics of Building Published in Damage Magazine

“The turn to a ‘politics of building’ is a welcome change in environmental thinking, but the green Left is still at odds in important ways with the labor movement, which better understands what is needed for deep decarbonization and, most importantly, has the power to help bring it about,” writes Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment.

May 1, 2024

Thompson Weighs In on Relations Between US Sisters and the Vatican in Global Sisters Report

Margaret Susan Thompson, associate professor of history and political science, says one of the biggest reasons for the changing relationship is that [Pope] Francis and other key decision-makers were members of religious congregations themselves. "I think that made a big difference," she says.

April 30, 2024

See related: Religion, United States

Taylor Discusses ‘Trump 2.0’ With the Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Brian Taylor, professor of political science, says a key feature of Trump 2.0 would likely be that the president would not have as many Russia-sceptics in his sphere. "If Trump is elected in 2024, he will surround himself with people who adhere to his worldview and are therefore less hostile to Russia and more sympathetic to Putin."

April 22, 2024

Siddiki, Baynes Honored for Excellence in Graduate Education

The student-driven award acknowledges faculty who have had a significant impact and positive influence on graduate education because of their superior graduate-level teaching, dedication to departmental and community presence and excellence in research and creative activities. 

April 15, 2024

See related: Awards & Honors

Peacebuilding Through Cooperation in Health Care and Public Health Between Israel and Palestine

Linda Young Landesman, Robert A. Rubinstein, Robert A., Brian S. Englander

“Peacebuilding Through Cooperation in Health Care and Public Health Between Israel and Palestine,” co-authored by Distinguished Professor of Anthropology Robert Rubinstein, was published in the Journal of Public Health Management & Practice.

April 12, 2024

Citizenship and Bureaucratic Indifference in Refugee-UNHCR Correspondence

Lamis Abdelaaty

"'The Greatest and Most Important Human Right': Citizenship and Bureaucratic Indifference in Refugee-UNHCR Correspondence," authored by Lamis Abdelaaty, associate professor of political science, was published in Migration Politics.

April 9, 2024

Taylor Provides an Update on Russia's War with Ukraine on Campbell Conversations

“In general, not a huge amount of change,” says Brian Taylor, professor of political science. “Russia is on the front foot now because Ukraine is running out of ammunition, especially artillery. And this has to do with the hold up on the U.S. military assistance package in the U.S. Congress over the last half year.”

March 30, 2024

Sultana Piece on Collaborating to Advance Water Justice Published in Nature

“Globally, safe water access for all can be achieved only by involving Indigenous and local communities in water governance and climate planning. People are not voiceless, they simply remain unheard. The way forward is through listening,” says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment.

March 22, 2024

See related: Climate Change, Water

Have Repertoire, Will Travel: Nonviolence as Global Contentious Performance

Selina Gallo-Cruz

"Have Repertoire, Will Travel: Nonviolence as Global Contentious Performance," written by Associate Professor of Sociology Selina Gallo-Cruz, was published by Cambridge University Press.

March 20, 2024

See related: Conflict

Taylor Discusses Putin and Russia’s Presidential Election With CBS News, Newsweek, Al Jazeera

“Really, we have 24 years of watching Putin build an increasingly repressive, authoritarian state. So the main purpose of elections like this in an authoritarian country is to show everyone that Putin is forever, there is no alternative to Putin, there's no point in resisting his state,” says Brian Taylor, director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

March 18, 2024

9 Projects Awarded MetLife Foundation-Lender Center Racial Wealth Gap Grants

The awards are funded by a 2022 MetLife Foundation grant that supports research and community programming over three years to examine the racial wealth gap’s root causes and ideas that may resolve its economic and social inequalities, says Kendall Phillips, Lender Center interim director.

March 13, 2024

Taylor Speaks With Fox, Newsweek, WWL Radio About the Ongoing War in Ukraine

"I thought the Russian invasion two years ago would have been more successful. I thought Russia would have managed to seize and hold more territory than they did. ...That’s because Russia fought worse than I thought they would and Ukraine has fought much better," says Brian Taylor, director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

February 27, 2024

Taylor Speaks With Forbes and WABC About the Death of Russian Opposition Leader Alexei Navalny

"We don’t know every detail about the circumstances of his death today, but it is 100 percent fair to say that Alexei Navalny was killed by Vladimir Putin and the Russian state," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science and director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

February 21, 2024

Taylor Quoted in La Presse Article on a Clash Between NATO and Russia

"He [Putin] could get drunk on his success, conclude that the West is just a paper tiger and decide to push further to see what happens," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science and director of the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs.

February 10, 2024

Catherine Herrold Receives Award to Study Locally Led Development in Serbia

The associate professor will analyze how Serbians organize for social change at the local level.

February 9, 2024

Taylor Comments on Declining Human Rights in Russia in Forbes Article

“Russia doesn't have real elections most of all because it's basically illegal to be an opposition politician or activist or independent journalist anymore, not just because of manipulating rules at election time,” says Brian Taylor, professor of political science.

January 30, 2024

Sultana Discusses the Feedback Loops Between War and Fossil Fuels in Atmos Article

“The control of oil and gas resources has been a key factor in many conflicts and geopolitical imperialism, either by providing part of the motivation for an invasion or by helping countries fund their militaries,” says Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment. “Conflict, in turn, feeds production by driving up oil and gas prices,” she adds.

January 26, 2024

Research by Sultana Cited in Scientific American Article on Extreme Weather, Long-Term Health

Women in Bangladesh suffer disproportionately during floods, as Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, has documented in a study, in part because they bear the brunt of responsibility for managing water and food for their household, as well as taking care of their children.

January 4, 2024

Taylor Weighs In on President Putin’s Announcement That He Will Run Again in RFE/RL Article

"Everyone knew this was coming and the only questions were when and how exactly the announcement would be made," says Brian Taylor, professor of political science. "Usually, things like this don’t happen by accident in Russian politics," he says.
December 20, 2023

See related: Elections, Government, Russia

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Conversations in Conflict Studies with Professor Tina Nabatchi

204 Maxwell Hall

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"Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy: Rethinking our Civic Infrastructures.”  Tina Nabatchi, Associate Professor in Public Administration and International Affairs at the Maxwell School, Syracuse University. Democracy is often described as ‘government of the people, by the people, for the people.’ We can easily recognize how representative democracy deals with the ‘of’ and ‘for’ – but where are we when it comes to ‘by’? What could government and residents gain in terms of better public policy and more effective program and service delivery if we encouraged and harnessed the many voices of ordinary people? Filled with examples, this presentation explores the forms of public participation, and explains how giving good process, activating local leaders and networks, using the building blocks of participation, and providing systemic supports can help us rethink our local civic infrastructures and advance governance for 21st century democracy.

Conversations in Conflict Studies is a weekly educational speaker series for students, faculty, and the community. The series, sponsored by PARCC, draws its speakers from Syracuse University faculty, national and international scholars and activists, and PhD students. Pizza is served. Follow us on Twitter @PARCCatMaxwell, tweet #ConvoInConflict.

If you require accommodations, please contact Deborah Toole by email at datoole@syr.edu or by phone at 315.443.2367. 


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Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration
400 Eggers Hall