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Maxwell / CEPA
  • About CEPA

    The Center for Environmental Policy and Administration (CEPA) is an interdisciplinary center at Syracuse University's Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs that focuses on environmental issues. It supports research by faculty and students from departments across Maxwell and works to foster broadly interdisciplinary teaching and research that links researchers in the social sciences with those in the natural sciences, engineering, and law. It also has close working relationships with Maxwell’s Center for Policy Research, with the University’s Environmental Finance Center, and with the University’s Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems.

  • CEPA News

    Popp discusses Biden's green jobs agenda in Forbes article

    "Wages in solar and wind could increase if demand increased, at least initially," says Professor David Popp, who wrote about the impact of fiscal policy on green jobs in a working paper in June 2020. "But higher wages would also attract more workers to develop the skills to work in wind and solar, so the increase need not be permanent." Read more in the Forbes article, "The Challenge Facing Biden’s Green Jobs Agenda? Green Jobs."

     

    Ajello Fellows create open data repository of electric grid in Vietnam

    When the pandemic hit, Nguyen Phan Bao Linh and Yu En Hsu were worried that they wouldn’t be able to find internships and they would have to leave their Data Analytics for Public Policy program. A gift from James Ajello’s MPA ’76 provided them the opportunity to quickly put together a project focused on energy and the environment that let them use their unique skills and abilities to create a valuable resource for sustainability researchers worldwide.

     

    Pralle discusses updating county flood maps in Cortland Standard

    The Cortland County flood map "might show a reasonable flood risk today, but since we don’t make those investment decisions with ramifications far into the future, the maps don’t really help us plan for a different climate," says Sarah Pralle, associate professor of political science. "When we look at flood maps now, the conversations are about the insurance cost," Pralle says. Instead, "we have to get to the point where we talk about these things as risks and how to mitigate these things as well." Read more in the Cortland Standard article, "What Cortland County’s flood map does, and doesn’t, show."

     

Center for Environmental Policy and Administration
200 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244-1020
Phone: +1.315.443.2252