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  • Four Maxwell students named as 2021 Boren Fellows

    Four students in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs have been named as recipients of the 2021 Boren Fellowship. The fellowship, sponsored by the National Security Education Program, funds immersive foreign language study abroad experiences for graduate students who plan to work in the federal national security arena. Through their experiences, the fellows develop critical foreign language and international skills that are important for their chosen careers. The recipients are Courtney Blankenship, Roger Onofre, Ivy Raines and Kelli Sunabe.

    7/9/2021

     

    Lovely talks to Bloomberg about Beijing relations with Europe, US

    Mary Lovely, professor of economics, discussed Beijing relations with Europe and the U.S. on 'Bloomberg Markets: China Open.' "I think that they [Europe] can have a very important role to play in lowering the temperature and starting to set the stage for us to find solutions and a way forward," Lovely says.

    7/9/2021

     

    Jacobson discusses US troop withdrawal, Afghanistan on CBS, MSNBC, VOA

    On Thursday, President Joe Biden announced the rapid withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan would conclude by August 31, weeks before the September 11 deadline he set earlier this year. The new deadline comes as the Taliban continue to gain new territory at an alarming pace, raising concerns the militant Islamic group could topple the Afghan government. "I still think there's a good chance that the Taliban are able to topple the government in Kabul and then we're right back to 1996 again," Mark Jacobson, assistant dean of Washington Programs, told VOA. Jacobson also discussed the withdrawal of U.S. troops from Afghanistan with ABC Radio National, CBS, MSNBC and USA Today.

    7/9/2021

     

    Bendix talks to LA Times about CA wildfires, fireworks threat

    Last month, more than 100 fire scientists signed a letter urging the Western U.S. to forgo fireworks this Fourth of July. Jacob Bendix, professor of geography and the environment who specializes in the study of wildfire distribution, was one of the scientists who signed the letter. Given the increasingly flammable landscape, "pleas to skip the fireworks make perfect sense," says Bendix. "This is particularly true in Southern California, where the vast majority of wildfires are started by people rather than lightning," he says, "so that it is largely in our hands as to whether our behavior causes catastrophe." Read more in the Los Angeles Times article, "No such thing as ‘safe and sane’ fireworks in a bone-dry California primed to burn."

    7/8/2021

     

    Farciy weighs in on Democrat's proposed tax strategy in WSJ

    Top Democrats are in the process of designing a roughly $1 trillion infrastructure deal, and a second, broader antipoverty package and they need to resolve differences over the amount of spending, how much must be paid for, and which of Mr. Biden’s proposed tax increases should advance. "A lot of Democratic voters are moderate to conservative. A lot of Democratic voters have low trust in government,” says Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science. "You have to tie it to something that is popular, that you can sell to people that will be an improvement in their day-to-day lives." Read more in the Wall Street Journal article, "Democrats Focus on Turning Tax Talk Into Action."

    7/8/2021

     

    Gadarian quoted in Vox piece on political polarization, COVID vaccine

    The COVID-19 epidemic in the U.S., at face value, has become a division between those who are vaccinated and those who are unvaccinated. But, increasingly, it’s also a division between Democrats and Republicans—as vaccination has ended up on one of the biggest dividing lines in the U.S., political polarization. "Partisanship is now the strongest and most consistent divider in health behaviors," says Professor Shana Gadarian. "It didn’t have to be this way," Gadarian says. "There’s really nothing about the nature of being a right-wing party that would require undercutting the threat of COVID from the very beginning." Gadarian was quoted in the Vox article, "How political polarization broke America’s vaccine campaign."

    7/8/2021

     

    Alumna oversees students in NYS Assembly where she once interned

    Going to work every day at the New York State Assembly, Vanessa Salman ’17 BA (PSc) is reminded of her time in the Maxwell School. As part of her responsibilities as a staff training associate for the Assembly Minority Conference, Salman oversees students within the conference participating in the Albany semester program. In 2017, Salman was one of those interns. The Assembly Intern Program in Albany gives students the opportunity to work full-time in the New York State legislature. DurSalman found her experience as an intern powerful, and this ultimately drew her back to work full-time post-graduation.

    7/8/2021

     

    Gueorguiev quoted in SCMP piece on Chinese human rights abuses, UN

    Highlighting the one-year anniversary of Hong Kong’s controversial national security law (NSL) and also focusing on mainland China’s far-western autonomous regions of Xinjiang and Tibet, the [U.S.] Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC), asked UN Secretary General António Guterres for "immediate measures to closely monitor and assess China’s behaviour." "Letters and appeals to [Guterres], as opposed to ambassadorial diplomacy, are more about public position-taking and signaling than they are about actual results," says Dimitar Gueorguiev, associate professor of political science. Read more in the South China Morning Post article, "US agency urges UN to move on investigation of alleged human rights abuses in China."

    7/7/2021

     

    Michelmore featured in WAER article on changes to Child Tax Credit

    The American Rescue Plan allows families, regardless of work status, to claim a tax credit up to $300 per month per child under the age of 17. "I think importantly in contrast to something that comes in a lump sum, which has its own benefits itself, getting something on a regular basis gives families something they can count on," says Katherine Michelmore, associate professor of public administration and international affairs. "So gives them some consistency, so they can count on getting this benefit every month, particularly if there’s some unexpected expenses that come up." Michelmore was featured in the WAER article, "Could New Child Tax Credit End Poverty for Many US Children? SU Expert on Impact."

    7/6/2021

     

    Thompson discusses US-Vatican relationship in The Hill

    Secretary of State Antony Blinken recently visited with Pope Francis in what was seen as an attempt to reset relations between Washington and the Holy See following former President Trump’s administration. "In this meeting, it seems that there was far more cordiality and acknowledgment of what the U.S. and Vatican have in common," says Margaret Susan Thompson. "I think this is emblematic of Pope Francis’s entire papacy that he has always emphasized a more comprehensive view of Catholic social teaching, he is not a single-issue pope," Thompson says. "There’s plenty about the Biden administration that the pope can work with. There’s plenty of areas they can agree on." Read more in The Hill article, "Post-Trump, Biden seeks to restore US relations with Holy See."

    7/6/2021

     

    Maxwell students awarded Downey Scholarships from SU ICCAE

    Four Maxwell students were among the 13 undergraduate, graduate and law students awarded Downey Scholarships by the Syracuse University Intelligence Community Center for Academic Excellence (SU ICCAE). The $1,500 award recognizes academic excellence, commitment to public service and potential to bring diverse and distinctive backgrounds and experiences to the U.S. Intelligence Community (IC).

    7/1/2021

     

    Hamersma study on health insurance, children's mental health published

    "The effect of public health insurance expansions on the mental and behavioral health of girls and boys," co-authored by Associate Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Sarah Hamersma, was published in Social Science & Medicine. The authors leverage major expansions in public health insurance eligibility for children and adolescents under Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program during 1997–2002 to examine mental health care utilization and outcomes for children in the National Survey of America's Families. They found the expansions are associated with an estimated 30% reduction in mental health care utilization for girls, but no measurable effect for boys, which may partly be accounted for by increased well-child visits for girls.

    6/30/2021

     

    Sociologists explore veteran service-connected disability in new study

    "Service-Connected Disability and the Veteran Mortality Disadvantage," co-authored by Maxwell sociologists Scott Landes, Andrew London and Janet Wilmoth, was published in Armed Forces & Society. Their results indicate that service-connected disability status accounts for some variation in, and may have a cumulative effect on, the veteran mortality disadvantage. Future research should account for service-connected disability status when studying veteran–nonveteran mortality differentials.

    6/29/2021

     

    Dwidar study on group lobbying, public policy published in PSJ

    "Diverse Lobbying Coalitions and Influence in Notice-and-Comment Rulemaking," authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Maraam Dwidar, was published in Policy Studies Journal. Dwidar tested the influence of diverse coalitions of interest groups on bureaucratic policy outputs by analyzing a new dataset of organizations’ co-signed public comments across nearly 350 federal agency rules proposed between 2005 and 2015. She found that agencies favor recommendations from organizationally diverse coalitions, and not coalitions that are bipartisan or dominated by business interests.

    6/26/2021

     

    Pralle examines changes in flood insurance rate maps in RHCPP

    "To appeal and amend: Changes to recently updated Flood Insurance Rate Maps," co-authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Sarah Pralle, was published in Risk, Hazards & Crisis in Public Policy. The findings suggest changes to flood zones on Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM) occur more often where people have greater socioeconomic means, raising questions of equity for future FIRM appeals and revisions.

    6/25/2021

     

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