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  • Wolf study on minimum wage, infant mortality featured on CNY Central

    A study by Douglas Wolf, Gerald B. Cramer Professor of Aging Studies, was featured in the CNY Central article "New SU study shows that raising the minimum wage could save lives." "Increasing the minimum wage benefits people who are not working but are somehow in the economic orbit of those who are," says Wolf. The study looked at data from 2001 to 2018 in states that have laws against raising the minimum wage, which did not include New York. "If those areas had been able to raise the minimum wage about 600 infant deaths would have been prevented," Wolf says.

    6/23/2021

     

    Schwartz quoted in EdSurge article on challenges of student mobility

    In Chelsea, Massachusetts, high student mobility used to be a challenge without a clear solution. But then the district formed the Five District Partnership to develop curriculum in tandem and make moving a bit easier. There’s new interest in the model as schools and communities suddenly face big changes in enrollment as a result of the pandemic. "It’s not like kids are moving from Boston to Chicago to LA and then back again,” says Amy Ellen Schwartz, Daniel Patrick Moynihan Chair in Public Affairs. "Kids for whom housing instability is a problem, many of them are moving around in the same urban area." Read more in the EdSurge article, "School Is Hard for Mobile Students. These Districts Want to Help."

    6/23/2021

     

    Khalil speaks to SBG about Iran's president-elect Ebrahim Raisi

    The Biden administration has made clear that reestablishing the nuclear agreement with Iran is a top concern for his administration. Experts say that may be increasingly possible following the election of hardline leader Ebrahim Raisi but any negotiations beyond the original 2015 nuclear deal could prove difficult if not impossible under Iran's new hardline president. The election of Raisi was a "mixed bag" for President Biden, says Osamah Khalil. "In the short term, it will likely enable a renewed JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action). In the longer term, it will make it more difficult to have an expanded agreement or expanded relations with Iran," he says. Read more in the Sinclair Broadcast Group article, "Iran's new hardline president could complicate Biden's foreign policy agenda."

    6/22/2021

     

    Banks discusses Dept. of Justice secret subpoenas on Bloomberg Law

    On the latest Bloomberg Law podcast episode, Professor Emeritus and national security law expert William Banks discussed the controversy over revelations the Justice Department under former President Donald Trump had secretly subpoenaed records from House Democrats, former White House counsel Don McGahn and members of the media.

    6/21/2021

     

    Thompson quoted in The Hill article on banning communion for Biden

    U.S. bishops are set to open a debate over whether President Biden, the second Catholic president in U.S. history, and other politicians should be denied communion based on their stance on abortion. It promises to be a testy discussion on a sensitive issue that is dividing people from the top of the Vatican, with some bishops eager to make an example of Biden and others warning this would weaponize the Holy Communion. "There really is a tension between bishops and that tension has always existed in the USCCB (U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops), it’s always been there. It’s just a question of what is predominant," says Margaret Susan Thompson. She was quoted in The Hill article, "Bishops to debate banning communion for president."

    6/21/2021

     

    Khalil weighs in on end of Israel PM Netanyahu's career in USA Today

    Israel's parliament cast a historic vote on Sunday that ended Benjamin Netanyahu's 12-year tenure as prime minister and ushered in a "change coalition" that includes hardline factions, centrists and an Arab party, the first ever in an Israeli government. "It is a watershed moment," says Osamah Khalil. It may be a "Nixon-goes-to-China" pivot in Israeli politics—making it easier for future Israeli politicians to join forces with Arab parties after the hardline Bennett took that first step, he adds. Read more in the USA Today article, "'Watershed moment': Netanyahu’s fate on the line as Israel prepares for historic vote." Khalil was also quoted in the USA Today article, "Who is Naftali Bennett, Israel’s next prime minister if Benjamin Netanyahu is ousted?"

    6/14/2021

     

    Internship Brings ‘Full Circle’ Moment

    Student Connor Muldoon watched the opening arguments in the trial of George Floyd’s convicted killer, former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, on a television in the Syracuse Police Department. His viewing companions—three police officers. It was a moment provided by an educational opportunity; Muldoon was hired to intern in the police department in the spring semester. The opportunity was made possible by a gift from Syracuse University alumnus and Maxwell Advisory Board member David Kelso ’68.

    6/14/2021

     

    Reeher quoted in The Hill article on Biden, success of democracies

    President Joe Biden is casting his first international trip as an opportunity to prove to the world that democracies work—but Americans are just as polarized as their elected representatives. "Biden does have a challenge," says Professor Grant Reeher. "He is arguing, 'I am here as the American president to be the leading voice.' But then he is subject to people saying, 'Wait a minute, look at what you folks have been going through. Why is it you? Why isn’t it [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel? Or one of the other leaders?' And it’s a legitimate criticism," he says. Read more in The Hill article, "The Memo: Biden says democracies work; the US is not helping his case."

    6/10/2021

     

    Gadarian comments on upcoming NYS mayoral races in City & State

    Incumbent mayors are facing challenges in Albany, Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse—Upstate New York’s four largest cities. These races are largely following a pattern found in recent Democratic primaries in New York, especially in New York City: More moderate incumbents are being challenged by opponents who say they have failed to address injustices like police brutality and income inequality. "I think what you’re seeing in upstate is pretty similar to what the discussion is at the national level in the Democratic Party, which is the progressive wing being more prominent than what you’ve seen in the past, and progressive Democrats running quite clearly on being progressive," says Professor Shana Gadarian. Read more in the City & State article, "Upstate incumbent mayors face challenges from the left."

    6/8/2021

     

    Abdelaaty talks to NBN about her book Discrimination and Delegation

    Lamis Abelaaty, assistant professor of political science, spoke with the New Books Network about her recently published book "Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees" (Oxford University Press, 2021). Abdelaaty develops a two-part theoretical framework in which policymakers in refugee-receiving countries weigh international and domestic concerts. At the international level, policymakers consider relations with the refugee-sending country. At the domestic level policymakers consider political competition among ethnic groups. When these international and domestic incentives conflict, shifting responsibility to the UN allows policymakers to placate both refugee-sending countries and domestic constituencies.

    6/8/2021

     

    Lovely discusses India's COVID crisis, US textile imports with NBC

    As the coronavirus pandemic tears across India, forcing garment factories to shut down or work at half capacity to stem new cases, retail suppliers are scrambling to move production to China. While India constitutes a smaller fraction of imports as compared to China, it still plays a significant role in certain sectors which makes it difficult to move supply chains outside the country, says Professor Mary Lovely. "If India dropped off the face of the world, where you would notice an impact is certainly in manufactured goods, textile and mill products and things like cloth and towels," she says. "You don't just move supply chains. They’re not like pins on a map." Read more in the NBC News article, "India's COVID crisis has ripple effects for garment industry worldwide."

    6/3/2021

     

    Faricy quoted in MarketWatch article on Child Tax Credit payouts

    The U.S. government is preparing to send up to $300 a month per child in expanded Child Tax Credit payouts to millions of families this summer. The payouts are due to start July 15 and stem from March’s $1.9 trillion stimulus law. "The Child Tax Credit isn’t new," says Christopher Faricy. "What might be new is the motivation driving this in the Biden administration, which is a real understanding about how outdated the social safety net is—and recognizing the dual-earner status as becoming much more common since the post-World War II era, when a lot of the safety net was built." Read more in the MarketWatch article, "Monthly payments of up to $300 per child are starting for most families — and could keep coming for years."

    6/1/2021

     

    Reeher comments on probes into Gov. Cuomo allegations in Newsday

    Inquiries regarding the Cuomo administration's handling of nursing homes and deaths from COVID-19, the governor's possible use of state personnel and resources to help produce his most recent book and the multiple allegations of sexual harassment leveled at the governor are advancing. "You’ve got three different institutions looking at accusations and he’s going to have to have clean bills of health on all of them to survive," says Professor Grant Reeher. "And the state-level institutions are all in his (Democratic) party, so he can’t claim partisan politics. That makes it tougher for him." Reeher was quoted in the Newsday article, "Cuomo probes move toward critical points with his tenure, legacy at stake."

    6/1/2021

     

    Heflin discusses food insecurity in military, veteran families in MT

    Professor Colleen Heflin and other advocates participated in a roundtable discussion of hunger in the military and veteran communities before the House Rules Committee on May 27. They discussed the stigma in asking for help that’s perceived by service members, veterans and their families; difficulties families face in qualifying for assistance; and lack of real data to quantify the extent of the problem. Heflin suggests providing automatic SNAP benefits, formerly known as food stamps, to service members in the lower ranks as they separate from the military. "It’s a small dollar item that could really help service members during this critical transition period." Read more in the Military Times article, "‘A national outrage’: Lawmakers seek solutions to food insecurity in military, veteran families."

    6/1/2021

     

    Flores-Lagunes discusses open jobs, unemployment on Syracuse.com

    At a time of high unemployment, CNY businesses are having trouble finding workers to take their low-wage jobs. That’s because an additional $300 a week in unemployment benefits means people who made minimum wage when working earn the equivalent of $15 an hour for sitting at home. “Workers have a little more power for a change,” says Alfonso Flores-Lagunes, professor of economics. Flores-Lagunes says he does not think the unemployment benefits are the only factor keeping people out of the workforce. But, he says, they are making it easier for people on the margin to stay home or to come back to work at a slower pace. Read more in the Syracuse.com article, "An epidemic of open jobs and the unemployed in CNY; for many, work doesn’t work anymore."

    5/27/2021

     

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