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  • Burman weighs in on scope of Biden's stimulus plan in Insider article

    President Biden's first economic package was bold in its size, breadth and lack of bipartisanship. It's a sharp contrast to the smaller package of the Obama era—and that era's slower recovery. "We have lots of experience with spending too little to try to get out of a recession. We don't have any experience with spending too much," says Leonard Burman, Paul Volcker Chair in Behavioral Economics. "So it'll be interesting to see what happens." Burman was quoted in the Insider article, "Biden is splitting with Obama on the economy and the proof is in their stimulus plans."

    3/29/2021

     

    Montez discusses state policies, life expectancy on Innovation Hub

    Policymakers have a thumb on the scale when it comes to how long we live. Jennifer Karas Montez, professor of sociology and Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar in Aging Studies, has spent her career studying the social causes of death and disease in the United States—how differing state policies have contributed to a seven year gap between the state with the highest (Hawaii) and the lowest (West Virginia) life expectancy in the U.S. Montez was interviewed for the segment, "Your State’s Politics Might Be The Death of You," on Innovation Hub podcast.

    3/26/2021

     

    Monnat examines opioid misuse, family structure in new study

    "Opioid misuse and family structure: Changes and continuities in the role of marriage and children over two decades," co-authored by Lerner Chair for Health Promotion Shannon Monnat, was published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. The authors found that married young adults and those with children have a lower probability of prescription opioid misuse and heroin use.

    3/26/2021

     

    Rasmussen speaks to Bloomberg about the Founders' disillusionment

    In his new book, “Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America’s Founders” (Princeton University Press, 2021), Dennis Rasmussen, professor of political science, grapples with the founding generation’s deep and abiding doubts about their experiment. He was interviewed for the Bloomberg article, "Even America’s Founders Were Disillusioned With America." "...their [the Founders] deepest causes for worry—extreme partisanship, an ineffective federal government, a lack of civic virtue, sectional divisions within the country—are very much still with us. That they’ve been here from the beginning suggests that they aren’t likely to go away any time soon," says Rasmussen.

    3/26/2021

     

    Williams discusses the US's approach to warfare on History Hit podcast

    Michael John Williams, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, was a guest on History Hit's Warfare podcast for the episode titled "Liberalism and the American Way of War." From Ancient Greece, through the Enlightenment, the Napoleonic Wars, World Wars I and II, and all the way through to modern drone warfare, Williams explains the American rationale, approach to and methods of warfare.

    3/24/2021

     

    Reeher weighs in on NY's 2022 gubernatorial race in Press-Republican

    With less than 20 months to go before the Nov. 8, 2022, statewide election, many potential scenarios are being discussed, and the most informed people can only speculate as to who the major party nominees for governor will be. Professor Grant Reeher says next year's Democratic primary may favor a left-leaning candidate such as Attorney General Letitia James, should she decide to go for the governor's office. The anchor of James' political strength is metropolitan New York City, which has the bulk of Democratic votes in the state. Read more in the Press-Republican article, "Cuomo crisis ignites hope for GOP as 2022 nears."

    3/24/2021

     

    McCormick talks to AP, Bloomberg about the US-Mexico border crisis

    A U.S. delegation discussed immigration and regional development in a series of meetings in Mexico on Tuesday at a time when the rising number of migrants arriving at their shared border has raised concerns in both countries. Gladys McCormick tells the Associated Press that while the Biden administration was employing a more diplomatic approach than Trump did, the U.S. delegation came in wanting "to have the Mexicans do some of their dirty work, which is yet again to stop the flow of people coming in on the southern border." McCormick was also quoted in the Bloomberg article, "U.S., Mexico Talk ‘Orderly’ Migration Amid More Crossings," and in the Sinclair Broadcast Group article, "Biden pushes for more cooperation from Mexico amid migrant surge."

    3/24/2021

     

    Six Maxwell students receive prestigious Critical Language Scholarship

    The Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Program is an intensive overseas language and cultural immersion program for American graduate and undergraduate students enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities. Traditionally, some 550 students spend eight to 10 weeks abroad studying one of 15 languages—Arabic, Azerbaijani, Bangla, Chinese, Hindi, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Punjabi, Russian, Swahili, Turkish or Urdu. The program is fully funded and includes intensive language instruction and structured cultural enrichment experiences designed to promote rapid language gains.

    3/23/2021

     

    Murrett discusses the progress of the Chinese navy in Military Times

    "There is a good deal of interest these days in the growth of the Chinese navy, known officially as the Peoples Liberation Army Navy (PLAN). Most of the discussion tends to focus on the steady and significant increase in the inventory of PLAN ships and submarines, as well as the gradual expansion of the operational reach of these ships," says Robert Murrett. "However, the other dimensions of sea power that constitute the real effectiveness of any navy are not always sufficiently considered. In the case of China, an assessment of strategy, operational proficiency, regional and global naval power, and leadership deserve additional emphasis," he says. Read more in his article, "China has a large and growing navy: What is the rest of the story?," published in Military Times.

    3/22/2021

     

    Three Maxwell students named 2021 Syracuse University Scholars

    Maxwell students Katelyn Bajorek, Patrick Linehan and Simran Mirchandani are among the twelve seniors that have been named as the 2021 Syracuse University Scholars, the highest undergraduate honor the University bestows.

    3/22/2021

     

    Burman discusses Biden's tax proposal in Vox article

    President Biden’s follow-up recovery plan is still taking shape, as are plans to accompany it with taxes. "Taking out the politics, planning a tax bill that would help reduce inequality, make the system work better, raise revenue to slow the rate of growth of the debt, all of those things would make a whole lot of sense," says Leonard Burman, Paul Volcker Chair in Behavioral Economics. "But the question is just timing, and it’s always a bad time for a tax increase because it’s hard to get your base excited about raising taxes." Burman was interviewed for the Vox article, "Joe Biden’s tax plan, explained."

    3/19/2021

     

    Pralle talks to Forbes about FEMA's upcoming changes, flood insurance

    Flood insurance premiums for millions of at-risk homes and businesses could surge as much as four times what they currently pay over the next few years when FEMA announces its "Risk Rating 2.0." For homeowners, or prospective buyers, "rising insurance rates could lead to a reduction in home values," says Sarah Pralle, associate professor of political science, and "they could be forced to sell at a loss, or even abandon their property." Pralle agrees that flood insurance has to change, but the government needs to "help vulnerable communities and homeowners who’ll struggle with the transition." Read more in the Forbes article, "FEMA’S Upcoming Changes Could Cause Flood Insurance To Soar At The Shore."

    3/19/2021

     

    Lovely quoted in Reuters article on Biden's nominee for US trade rep

    Katherine Tai, President Joe Biden’s nominee for U.S. Trade Representative, won unanimous support in a U.S. Senate procedural vote on Tuesday and appeared set for confirmation. "The 98-0 vote in favor does, I believe, show her views are in line with many senators on trade," say Professor Mary Lovely. She adds that Tai has satisfied pro-labor lawmakers by playing an important role in negotiating stronger labor provisions in the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement and has satisfied China hawks by vowing to hold Beijing to its promises. Read more in the Reuters article, "Biden trade nominee Tai wins unanimous U.S. Senate backing in procedural vote."

    3/18/2021

     

    Reeher weighs in on Tucker Carlson 2024 run in National Interest

    Tucker Carlson, host of Fox News’s "Tucker Carlson Tonight," has been floated as a contender for a presidential run in 2024. "Carlson has been keen to focus on the supposed failings and absurdities of Democratic elites, and that puts him in as good a position as any to inherit his supporters—those for whom Trump, as an individual candidate and office-holder, carried some extra appeal beyond the standard Republican brand," says Grant Reeher, professor of political science. He was quoted in the National Interest article, "How Tucker Carlson Could Take Over the GOP and Run in 2024."

    3/18/2021

     

    Jackson talks about Black women's experiences with COVID in GenForward

    In their article, "This Women’s History Month, Recognize Black Women’s Efforts To Save Ourselves," published by the GenForward Survey, Jenn Jackson discusses Black women's experiences with COVID-19. "This Women’s History Month, as we celebrate our wins it’s critical that we acknowledge how Black women continue to struggle against the disproportionate impacts of health precarity and how that struggle has only been compounded during the pandemic," writes Jackson. "For many of these women, it isn’t just the health institutions and systemic racism that shape their experiences during the pandemic. It has also been the proliferation of unreliable information sources since the start of the global health crisis."

    3/16/2021

     

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