Skip to content

Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: State & Local

Shi Article on Putting Teachers on School Boards Published in Education Next

Ying Shi, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, and John G. Singleton of the University of Rochester, investigated what happens when educators are elected to school boards. "Despite raising teachers’ salaries, electing an educator to a school board does not translate into improved outcomes for students and has negative impacts on charter schools."

June 5, 2023

Barton Article on Making Primaries Nonpartisan, or Eliminating Them, Published in Governing

"Primary elections are where most of those who govern us are chosen. Can making them nonpartisan—or eliminating them altogether—diminish the impact of ideological fringes? What has happened in Louisiana suggests that it can," writes Richard Barton, assistant teaching professor of public administration and international affairs and policy studies.

May 11, 2023

Murrett Talks to Censor.NET About How the US Cares for War Veterans

"I believe that all three of these areas are important: business support, education and especially taking care of veterans' families. It is very important to support families. And, of course, support in the healthcare sector is fundamental," says retired Vice Adm. Robert Murret, professor of practice of public administration and international affairs.

May 6, 2023

Banks Weighs in on Claim that Nashville Protest Was an Insurrection in USA Today Article

“The critical difference is there was no threat to the integrity of a democracy in Tennessee,” says William Banks, professor emeritus of public administration and international affairs. “Insurrection conditions occur when civilian authorities are unable to enforce the laws. That was a real threat on Jan. 6. Not so in Nashville.”

April 28, 2023

Montez Quoted in Boston Globe Article on Life Expectancy and Where People Live

In one study, University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and other researchers found that, if every state simply implemented the same policy environment as Connecticut, “The U.S. would increase its life expectancy by roughly two years,” she says. “That is a massive increase.”

April 24, 2023

New State and Local Scholarship Supports Student’s Path to Local Government

Rosalyn Impink is the first recipient of the scholarship created by an alumnus who had a long career in public finance.

April 12, 2023

Huber Talks to Real Change News About Carbon Pricing Programs

The fact that the costs of compliance are typically borne by workers and consumers is a fundamental flaw of carbon pricing programs, says Matthew Huber, professor of geography and the environment. It’s one that, he suggests, has led to the Biden administration’s relatively skeptical stance on cap-and-trade programs.

March 20, 2023

Taylor Hamilton ’18 MPA/MA (IR) to Spend a Year in Asia as a Luce Scholar

The Maxwell School alum aspires to work as an urbanist and spatial equity advocate.

March 15, 2023

Griffiths Speaks with Pluribus News About American Secessionist Movements

“Those processes, they’re hard to pull off. You need to have both sides in agreement. It just doesn’t happen that much,” says Ryan Griffiths, associate professor of political science. “The thresholds for success are just too high to make it work.”

February 28, 2023

Reeher Quoted in Governing Article on New York Gov. Kathy Hochul

The governor of New York possesses too much formal power to think about writing her off, says Grant Reeher, director of the Campbell Public Affairs Institute. “She has an enormous amount of power in the budget,” he says, “and that’s the thing that’s coming up next.”

February 3, 2023

Explore by:

Communications and Media Relations Office
200 Eggers Hall