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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: State and Local

Rosenthal cited in Financial Post article on commercial real estate

February 12, 2021
 The authors' empirical analysis of 56,765 commercial leases signed between January 2019 and October 2020 across 109 urban centers in the United States revealed that commercial real estate in the urban core, especially in cities where public transit accounts for a sizable share of work trips, has indeed lost value. 

Banks weighs in on Republican's support for Trump in China Daily

February 10, 2021
Because Senate conviction requires a two-thirds majority, it is highly unlikely that 67 senators will line up against the former president, according to Professor Emeritus William C. Banks. 

Montez quoted in Undark article on state policies, life expectancy

February 2, 2021
Professor Jennifer Karas Montez was quoted in the Undark article, "Are Conservative Policies Shortening American Lives?"

Popp weighs in on Biden's climate directives in New York Times

January 28, 2021
David Popp, Caroline Rapking Faculty Scholar in Public Administration and Policy and co-author of a 2020 paper on the employment effects of the Obama-era spending on green job creation, discounted the notion of creating one million new auto manufacturing jobs. 

Reeher talks to CNY Central about local benefits of a Biden presidency

January 25, 2021
"It might make it a little bit easier for John Katko to get the ear of the president if there's a major piece of legislation being negotiated," Reeher says. "We may be on his radar when he's thinking about the problems of small to mid-size cities. Are they getting the help from the federal government that they need? I think that is going to be a good thing for this area."

Reeher discusses New York State's first Senate majority leader, Schumer, with Democrat & Chronicle

January 14, 2021
Professor Grant Reeher says Sen. Chuck Schumer’s rise to the majority leader role would likely have "some beneficial effect" in terms of money flowing to his home state, though he suggests that could be tempered by how closely divided the Senate is. 

Steinberg provides insight into what to expect globally in 2021 on TVO

January 14, 2021
University Professor James Steinberg was a guest on TVO's "The Agenda" to discuss what he witnessed in 2020 and what he expects will play out around the world in 2021.

Monnat weighs in on Central New York COVID-19 deaths in Syracuse.com article

January 5, 2021
"To keep things in perspective, there have been 330 COVID deaths in the county over the whole year so far," says Shannon Monnat, Lerner Chair for Public Health Promotion. "There are still far more deaths annually from heart disease and cancer," she adds. But, "If these numbers are similar for 2020," Monnat says, “COVID will be the third-leading cause of death in the county this year."

Associated Press: Purser discusses the right for renters to have legal counsel

January 4, 2021
"The push for right to counsel preceded the pandemic, but it’s particularly acute and particularly urgent in light of the pandemic, given just the overall precarity that renters are facing," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology.

See related: State and Local, Housing

Radcliffe quoted in Deseret News article on COVID-19 double standards

January 4, 2021
For people struggling to stay motivated to continue social distancing and wearing masks, cases where public officials ignore the very rules they are imposing on others can be frustrating. In the field of behavioral ethics, this phenomenon is called "ethical fading," says Dana Radcliffe, adjunct professor of public administration and international affairs. The term describes the way people deceive themselves to hide the wrongness of their choices. But, officials should be held to a higher standard, he says, especially when public health is on the line. "People who have considerable power or ability to influence others have a greater obligation to make sure that their actions match their words—because their words and actions can affect the behavior and welfare of others," says Radcliffe. Read more in the Deseret News article, "7 times public officials had double standards on COVID-19." 

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