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Maxwell School News and Commentary

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Huber Explores the Climate Change Crisis as a Class Problem in New Book

June 8, 2022

Huber, professor of geography and the environment, focuses on the everyday material struggle of the working-class over access to energy, food, housing and transportation. Huber argues that these necessities are core industries that need to be decarbonized.

The Economics of COVID-19

June 1, 2022
The threats and complexities from the COVID-19 pandemic shock are the core subject of this latest volume in the Contributions to Economic Analysis series.

See related: COVID-19, Econometrics

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the Age Pattern of Adult Mortality

April 27, 2022

"Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the Age Pattern of Adult Mortality," written by sociologists Andrew London and Scott Landes, was published in Biodemography and Social Biology.

Mark Monmonier's Book Traces the Invention of the Clock System

April 7, 2022

Monmonier, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Geography and the Environment, follows John Byron Plato's path from farmer in his mid-30s to inventor of several inventions including the “Clock System,” which assigned addresses to rural residences without house numbers.

Mazur Addresses Causes of Ice Ages and Effects on the Social History of Humanity in New Book

March 14, 2022

Allan Mazur, professor emeritus of policy studies at the Maxwell School, has published a new book, “Ice Ages: Their Social and Natural History” (Cambridge University Press, 2022). 

Ackerman Examines Two Nationalist Insurrections to Explain Origin of the Mass Party in New Book

March 3, 2022
Edwin Ackerman examines two nationalist insurrections that were largely composed of a peasant-base in Mexico in 1921 and Bolivia in 1952 in his new book, "Origins of the Mass Party: Dispossession and the Party-Form in Mexico and Bolivia in Comparative Perspective" (University of Oxford Press, 2021).  

Help Me Grow Follow Up Texting Intervention

February 28, 2022
The Maxwell X Lab partnered with Help Me Grow (HMG) to test if a texting campaign that leverages the importance of timing can better encourage parents to respond to the HMG team more consistently.

Drake Addresses Long-Standing Problems of Educational Inequality in New Book

February 25, 2022

In his new book, "Academic Apartheid: Race and the Criminalization of Failure in an American Suburb" (University of California Press, 2022), Sean J. Drake looks at how race and class intersect, contributing to educational inequality and modern school segregation. 

Lutz Examines How Social Contexts and Culture Affect Parenting Decisions in New Book

February 17, 2022
Amy Lutz, associate professor of sociology at the Maxwell School, is the co-author of a new book, "Parenting in Privilege or Peril: How Social Inequality Enables or Derails the American Dream" (Teachers College Press, 2021). The book examines how social contexts and culture affect parenting decisions. 

Murphy examines race and borders in the colonial Caribbean in new book

December 18, 2021
In her new book, "The Creole Archipelago: Race and Borders in the Colonial Caribbean" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Tessa Murphy, assistant professor of history, traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge connections that spanned the eastern Caribbean.

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