Skip to Main Content

Connect with Us Remotely

Maxwell / Department of Political Science
  • Department of Political Science

    The Department of Political Science is devoted to the study of politics and government, domestically and abroad. This includes the study of political institutions that exercise government authority, including legislatures, courts, and administrative agencies; political organizations through which individuals and groups seek to reshape the political landscape, including parties, interest groups, and social movements; public policies that reflect governmental efforts to regulate the actions of individuals and corporations, including civil rights, immigration, and environmental policy; and the interactions between and among nation-states and transnational organizations that shape patterns of trade and development, conflict and cooperation, war and peace.

    At the undergraduate level, political science majors will be exposed to political inquiry across a broad array of substantive topics, while also concentrating in one of the following areas: American Politics & History, Law & Politics, Political Economy, Political Participation & Mobilization, Global Governance & Foreign Policy, Political Violence & Conflict, Public Policy, Parties & Elections, Comparative Politics, Citizenship & Democracy, or Political Thought & Philosophy.

    At the graduate level, doctoral students receive broad training in quantitative and qualitative methods of social science research, while also concentrating in two of the following substantive fields: American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations, Political Theory, Public Administration & Policy, Law & Courts, or Security Studies.

  • Commitment to Inclusion

    The Maxwell School stands in support of all who are demanding change in the face of racism, violence, and hate speech. We are committed to making our school, our university, and our communities more inclusive and just for all.

    There is absolutely no place for behavior or language that degrades any individual or group’s race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender, disability, or religious beliefs.

  • Upcoming Events RSS Feed

    • Due to public health concerns around COVID-19, all in-person public events are postponed or canceled until further notice.

    • Check Back Soon for Upcoming Events.
  • Political Science News

    Reeher quoted in The Hill article on Biden, success of democracies

    President Joe Biden is casting his first international trip as an opportunity to prove to the world that democracies work—but Americans are just as polarized as their elected representatives. "Biden does have a challenge," says Professor Grant Reeher. "He is arguing, 'I am here as the American president to be the leading voice.' But then he is subject to people saying, 'Wait a minute, look at what you folks have been going through. Why is it you? Why isn’t it [German Chancellor] Angela Merkel? Or one of the other leaders?' And it’s a legitimate criticism," he says. Read more in The Hill article, "The Memo: Biden says democracies work; the US is not helping his case."

     

    Gadarian comments on upcoming NYS mayoral races in City & State

    Incumbent mayors are facing challenges in Albany, Buffalo, Rochester and Syracuse—Upstate New York’s four largest cities. These races are largely following a pattern found in recent Democratic primaries in New York, especially in New York City: More moderate incumbents are being challenged by opponents who say they have failed to address injustices like police brutality and income inequality. "I think what you’re seeing in upstate is pretty similar to what the discussion is at the national level in the Democratic Party, which is the progressive wing being more prominent than what you’ve seen in the past, and progressive Democrats running quite clearly on being progressive," says Professor Shana Gadarian. Read more in the City & State article, "Upstate incumbent mayors face challenges from the left."

     

    Abdelaaty talks to NBN about her book Discrimination and Delegation

    Lamis Abelaaty, assistant professor of political science, spoke with the New Books Network about her recently published book "Discrimination and Delegation: Explaining State Responses to Refugees" (Oxford University Press, 2021). Abdelaaty develops a two-part theoretical framework in which policymakers in refugee-receiving countries weigh international and domestic concerts. At the international level, policymakers consider relations with the refugee-sending country. At the domestic level policymakers consider political competition among ethnic groups. When these international and domestic incentives conflict, shifting responsibility to the UN allows policymakers to placate both refugee-sending countries and domestic constituencies.

     

Department of Political Science
100 Eggers Hall
Syracuse, NY 13244-1020
Phone: +1.315.443.2416