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Associated Press: Purser discusses the right for renters to have legal counsel

"The push for right to counsel preceded the pandemic, but it’s particularly acute and particularly urgent in light of the pandemic, given just the overall precarity that renters are facing," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology.
January 4, 2021

Strategies of Secession and Counter-Secession

Edited by Ryan Griffiths, Diego Muro
December 31, 2020

Stuart Brown and Margaret Hermann publish a study on transnational crime

Stuart Brown, Margaret Hermann

This book examines 80 such safe havens which function outside effective state-based government control and are sustained by illicit economic activities.

December 31, 2020

Purser cited in Washington Post article on economic relief package

According to research by Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology, somewhere between 2.4 million and 5 million American households are at risk of eviction in January alone if Congress fails to reach an agreement on economic emergency relief. 

December 15, 2020

Alumna Kristen Patel named Gregg Professor of Practice at Maxwell

Kristen Patel will teach undergraduate courses in policy studies and graduate courses in public administration and international affairs. 

December 7, 2020

Sultana quoted in Truthout article on students' travel during pandemic

It’s a common practice for people throughout the world to observe holidays far from their loved ones, says Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment, suggesting that observing Thanksgiving and Christmas in the United States should be no different. She points out that the largest pilgrimage in the world, the Hajj, was canceled earlier this year. "This pandemic needs to be reined in, so both individual choices matter alongside formal policy advice and institutional mechanisms that promote pandemic response," she says. Read more in the Truthout article, "Hundreds of Thousands of Students Traveled Home This Week Amid COVID Spike." 
December 1, 2020

See related: COVID-19, United States

Sultana talks to Scientific American about Biden, climate justice

"The most important action the Biden administration can do is to undertake all its policies and actions through a climate justice lens...and approach action with equity, accountability and justice in mind," says Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment.

November 12, 2020

Sultana comments on Joe Biden's victory in Carbon Brief article

"This was a climate election since a large majority of voters noted that they were concerned with climate breakdown," says Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment. "Biden has a climate plan and a mandate and he has promised to listen to scientists…which is vastly different from the last four years of war on science." 

November 10, 2020

Purser looks at teaching thrift in job readiness programs in new study

Brian Hennigan & Gretchen Purser
October 26, 2020

Sultana participates in international event on climate research

Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment, participated in "Intersectionality and Climate justice: Towards an Emancipatory Climate Research Agenda," an event organized by the Centre for Climate Justice at Glasgow Caledonian University. The international webinar brought together critical scholars interested in climate justice and intersectionality with the aim of exploring common threads between the two concepts.

October 8, 2020

See related: Climate Change

Sultana talks to The Sanctuary for Independent Media about divesting from fossil fuels

Farhana Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment, says "a divestment from fossil fuels signals a commitment to ending climate breakdown, to have climate justice, and to think about equitable and just transitions toward regenerative economies and societies that move away from fossil fuels."

September 18, 2020

Maxwell sociologists appointed to leadership roles at ASA

Three professors of sociology at the Maxwell School, all affiliated with the University’s Aging Studies Institute, have been named to leadership roles within the American Sociological Association (ASA), the premiere professional organization for scholarly research in sociology.
September 14, 2020

Purser named Montonna Professor, recognizing work with undergraduates

The Dr. Ralph E. Montonna Endowed Professorship for the Teaching and Education of Undergraduates fund is designed to provide support, in the form of a supplemental research fund, to a professor with notable engagement in undergraduate education. Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology, received this year's award.

August 31, 2020

Catherine Gerard concludes 15 years of leadership at PARCC

After serving as its director or co-director since 2005, Catherine Gerard has stepped down from her leadership role at the Maxwell School’s renowned Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC), effective July 1, 2020. Gerard will continue as an adjunct professor of public administration and associate director for the Executive Education Programs at Maxwell, and also continue her work as co-director of the Collaborative Governance Initiative at PARCC. 

July 30, 2020

Dean’s Office, CPR fund summer project assistantships

Eleven faculty members will receive awards from the Maxwell School to support emerging research projects this summer.
June 24, 2020

Nabatchi quoted in Washington Post article on American bureaucracy

"Every candidate has campaigned on a bureaucracy-bashing theme," says Tina Nabatchi, Joseph A. Strasser Endowed Professor in Public Administration. "That message has gotten through to affect people’s confidence in government."

May 18, 2020

See related: Government, United States

Humphrey Fellows workshop, Coronavirus serves as case study

Humphrey Fellows at a recent weeklong seminar discussed the coronavirus in the context of crisis management planning. “Crises are almost the perfect storm for challenges in good governance,” workshop leader and Maxwell School faculty affiliate Bruce W. Dayton said. “During a crisis you are under high stress. Everyone is paying attention. You have very short time to make decisions and you’re confronted with uncertainty. All of those are interconnected.”
March 9, 2020

African Outlook

Jok Madut Jok, professor of anthropology, "brings regional expertise on a part of the world that is critically important from a security standpoint,” says John McPeak, a professor of public administration and international affairs. “He also adds a new perspective on issues of humanitarian relief, post-conflict reconstruction, immigration and refugee flows, and negotiations."

January 10, 2020

Maxwell faculty co-edit new book on intractable conflicts

Catherine M. Gerard, Miriam F. Elman and Louis Kriesberg
December 31, 2019

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Scratching Out a Living: Activist Research for Immigrant Worker Justice

220 Eggers Hall, Strasser Legacy Room

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Angela Stuesse, author of Scratching Out a Living: Latinos, Race, and Work in the Deep South, will be the Keynote Speaker at the Labor Studies Working Group Tenth Decade Project Graduate Research Symposium.

The Work, Labor, and Citizenship Initiative nurtures interdisciplinary study of the many fundamental trends now at play in the broad field of labor studies. Over the past four decades, the world has experienced a precipitous increase in income inequality, fueled in part by the global restructuring of labor markets and the collapse of organized labor. At the same time, rights and entitlements traditionally associated with employment have been undermined by a shifting worker/employer power balance, with effects on job security, benefits, pensions, and wages. Across the globe, labor markets are characterized by mass unemployment, disruptive migration, and a burgeoning informal sector. These trends have direct implications for political participation and workers’ sense of of their own citizenship. This workshop will explore the shifting terrain of work and labor and its implications for citizenship. 


If you require accommodations, please contact Deborah Toole by email at datoole@syr.edu or by phone at 315.443.2367.


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Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration
400 Eggers Hall