• Welcome to the Sociology Department

    As part of the prestigious Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, we take an interdisciplinary approach to public sociology to understand, critique, and address structural and social inequalities. Known nationally for our expertise in qualitative methods, our award winning faculty also provide excellent training in quantitative research methods, theory, and a wide variety of sociological issues. Our faculty research, and our courses, include a range of areas such as health, aging, life course, globalization, immigration, transnational studies, family, education, work, power, capital, and culture. 

    Undergraduate training in sociology emphasizes broad understandings of how societies operate.  Students develop more in-depth understanding of particular institutions and practices, including health care, families, education, criminology, environment, labor, industry, and immigration.  They also develop expertise on particular social issues, including sex and gender, race, ethnicity, class, social policies, globalization, and power.  This knowledge provides a useful background for students pursuing a wide range of careers.  Our alumni hold positions in education, journalism, social services, marketing, business, government, strategic planning, criminology, personnel, health care, and law.  Those who pursue graduate training find they are well prepared.

    Graduate training is organized around four major areas: (1) Globalization, Immigration, Transnational Studies; (2) Health, Aging, Life Course; (3) Family, Education, Work; and (4) Power, Capital, Culture. Our aim is to prepare students for all aspects of their career: research, teaching, publishing, grants, and mentoring. We begin with professional development seminar that assures that all students have the opportunities they need to become fully prepared future scholars.  Our PhD students hold positions at prestigious research universities, liberal arts colleges, NGOs, government offices, and corporations.

    The Sociology Department at Syracuse University offers core training in sociological issues, methods, theory, and practice.  Our department includes 18 current faculty, 7 affiliated faculty, and 10 emeriti faculty, many of whom have won national and international awards for their work and hold leadership positions in our national organizations.  Our sociology faculty are affiliated with numerous Syracuse University Programs and Centers including: the Aging Studies Institute; the Asian/Asian American Studies Program; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) Studies; Women and Gender Studies; Disability Studies; African American Studies; Native American Studies; Cultural Foundations of Education; the Humanities Center; the Institute for Veterans and Military Families, the Institute for the Study of the Judiciary, Politics and the Media, the Center for Policy Research; the Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflict; the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion and the Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs. The department provides opportunities for joint degrees or collaborative study with such centers as well.


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    Kriesberg op-ed on Israeli-Palestinian conflict published in The Hill

    Kriesberg op-ed on Israeli-Palestinian conflict published in The Hill

    Louis Kriesberg, professor emeritus of sociology, discusses the impact President Trump's current strategy to settle the Israeli-Palestinian conflict will have on Israelis, Palestinians, and Americans in his article, "The danger of a one-sided strategy for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict," published in The Hill.
     
    Monnat participates in NY Times panel on solving opioid problem

    Monnat participates in NY Times panel on solving opioid problem

    Shannon Monnat, Lerner Chair for Public Health Promotion, took part in a New York Times panel asked to allocate a hypothetical budget to solve the opioid epidemic. Read why she would choose to spend money on community development in the article, "How a Police Chief, a Governor and a Sociologist Would Spend $100 Billion o Solve the Opioid Crisis."
     
    Harrington Meyer discusses grandparents as caregivers in 55 Plus

    Harrington Meyer discusses grandparents as caregivers in 55 Plus

    Madonna Harrington Meyer, professor of sociology, was interviewed for the 55 Plus article, "Should You Get Paid to Babysit?" According to Harrington Meyer, grandparents caring for their grandchildren is a complicated issue. "A lot of times, the adult children bring up the topic of payment," she adds.
     
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