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Maxwell School News and Commentary

Filtered by: Mental Health

Research by Sultana Cited in Scientific American Article on Extreme Weather, Long-Term Health

Women in Bangladesh suffer disproportionately during floods, as Farhana Sultana, professor of geography and the environment, has documented in a study, in part because they bear the brunt of responsibility for managing water and food for their household, as well as taking care of their children.

January 4, 2024

Gender Differences in Adults with ADHD

Ashely Schiros, Andrew S. London, Kevin M. Antshel

"Gender Differences in Adults with ADHD," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Andrew London, was published in the Clinical Handbook of ADHD Assessment and Treatment Across the Lifespan.

November 28, 2023

Punch Quoted in Albany Times Union Article on Federal Lawsuits Against Meta

“Social media works a lot like any other type of addictive drug,” says Alexandra Punch, director of the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion and Population Health. “When you utilize these services, it triggers dopamine responses and serotonin responses in the brain, so it also increases your craving for more of that same thing.”

November 4, 2023

Ueda-Ballmer Quoted in New York Times Article on Subway Platform Safety

Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, says the authority should install at least small metal gates to make the system safer. “It’s better than nothing,” she says. “If there’s somebody pushed, just by accident, and if you have metal bars, I think that would definitely help.”

October 26, 2023

Sandwiched in Later Life: Consequences for Individuals’ Well-Being, Variation Across Welfare Regimes

Marco Albertini, Noah Lewin-Epstein, Merril Silverstein, Aviad Tur-Sinai

"Becoming sandwiched in later life: Consequences for individuals’ well-being and variation across welfare regimes," co-authored by Professor and Chair of Sociology Merril Silverstein, was published in The Journals of Gerontology.

October 23, 2023

Emotion and Political Psychology

Shana Kushner Gadarian, Ted Brader

Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science, co-authored a chapter in the Oxford Handbook of Political Psychology 3rd Edition titled "Emotion and Political Psychology."

September 21, 2023

Ueda-Ballmer Weighs In on Japan’s Mental Health Crisis, Gender Inequality in The Nation Article

“Suicide was always a men’s issue,” says Michiko Ueda-Ballmer, associate professor of public administration and international affairs. During the pandemic, “suddenly, women’s suffering became visible.” For the first time, “the government was forced to confront an approach to suicide prevention that had previously focused exclusively on middle-aged men.” 

July 20, 2023

Reeher Comments on How to Solve Gun Violence Issues in Alabama Reflector Article

Grant Reeher, professor of political science, says no single law will solve the issues of gun violence. “You have to think very specifically about it,” Reeher says. “There is no one blanket policy that is going to say, ‘OK, this is going to reduce gun violence and it is going to apply equally to everybody.’ You have to think of the pockets and where the risk is.”

June 5, 2023

Gadarian Discusses the Role of Loneliness in Extremism and Politics in Newsweek Article

"People are looking for that kind of connection, and if they can find it with a group that they don't know online, they don't necessarily see the bad parts of what's happening," says Shana Gadarian, professor and chair of political science. "Then with the technological part of it where extreme voices get more airtime on the internet, you can see how people get radicalized."

May 18, 2023

Jackson Discusses the Health Phenomenon ‘Weathering’ and Its Impact on Black Women With Insider

"We know that Black women are paid less than their white counterparts, are expected to work longer hours with fewer pay raises, and are the most likely to be in unemployment lines when those rates increase. So these types of discriminatory practices shape the types of visceral effects that happen to Black women's bodies," says Jenn Jackson, assistant professor of political science.

February 17, 2023

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