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Sociology News & Events

Why Don't South Asians in the US Count As “Asian”? Factors Shaping Anti-South Asian Racism in the US

Prema Kurien, Bandana Purkayastha

"Why Don't South Asians in the U.S. Count As 'Asian'?: Global and Local Factors Shaping Anti-South Asian Racism in the United States," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Prema Kurien, was published in Sociological Inquiry.

February 20, 2024

$1.5 Million Grant Expands Study of ‘Pay to Stay’ Fees for Incarcerated Individuals

Gabriela Kirk-Werner, assistant professor of sociology, is among a trio of researchers who’ve launched the Captive Money Lab with the support of Arnold Ventures.

February 13, 2024

Landes Weighs In on US Census Bureau Change in How It Asks About Disabilities in AP Article

“Good news. Good news. Good news,” says Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology and O'Hanley Faculty Scholar. “They got the message that we need to engage.”

February 8, 2024

Educational Attainment and Perceived Need for Future ADL Assistance

Julia M. Finan, Scott D. Landes

"Educational Attainment and Perceived Need for Future ADL Assistance," co-authored by Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology, was published in the Journal of Applied Gerontology.

February 5, 2024

See related: Aging, Education, United States

Yingyi Ma Article on the Renewed Fervor for China’s Civil Service Exam Published in Nikkei Asia

"The contrast with today's youth highlights broader economic and global trends, namely China's current economic slowdown, which has led to reduced hiring, stagnating wages and a general sense of job insecurity in many industries. This environment naturally makes the stability and predictability of government jobs more appealing," writes Yingyi Ma, professor of sociology.

January 12, 2024

See related: China, Education, Government, Labor

Geographically Specific Associations Between County-Level Socioeconomic Distress and Mortality

Xue Zhang, Shannon M. Monnat

"Geographically specific associations between county-level socioeconomic and household distress and mortality from drug poisoning, suicide, alcohol, and homicide among working-age adults in the United States," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in SSM - Population Health.

January 11, 2024

Estimated Arterial Stiffness, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

Kevin Heffernan, Janet Wilmoth, Andrew London

"Estimated Arterial Stiffness, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia Among Middle-Aged and Older Adults," co-authored by sociologists Janet Wilmoth and Andrew London, was published in Innovation in Aging.

January 9, 2024

See related: Longevity, United States

Digital Communication As Compensation for Infrequent In-Person Contact With Grandkids During COVID

Xiaoyu Fu, Woosang Hwang, Merril Silverstein

"Digital Communication As Compensation for Infrequent In-Person Contact With Grandchildren During the Pandemic," co-authored by Merril Silverstein, professor and chair of sociology, was published in Innovation in Aging.

January 9, 2024

Military Service Experiences, Hearing Difficulty, and Difficulty Remembering/Concentrating

Andrew London, Scott Landes, Janet Wilmoth

"Noncombat and Combat Military Service Experiences, Hearing Difficulty, and Difficulty Remembering/Concentrating," co-authored by sociologists Andrew London, Scott Landes and Janet Wilmoth, was published in Innovation in Aging.

January 9, 2024

See related: United States, Veterans

Food Insecurity, Race and Ethnicity, and Cognitive Function Among United States Older Adults

Haowei Wang, Naglaa El-Abbadi

"Food Insecurity, Race and Ethnicity, and Cognitive Function Among United States Older Adults," co-authored by Haowei Wang, assistant professor of sociology, was published in the Journal of Nutrition.

December 19, 2023

Landes Comments on US Census Bureau Changes to Questions About Disabilities in AP Article

The bureau has spent time, money and energy trying to improve counts of racial and ethnic minorities who have been historically undercounted, but the statistical agency seems willing to adapt questions that will shortchange the numbers of people with disabilities, says Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology.

December 8, 2023

Counting Disability in the National Health Interview Survey and Its Consequence

Scott D. Landes, Bonnielin K. Swenor, Nastassia Vaitsiakhovich

"Counting disability in the National Health Interview Survey and its consequence: Comparing the American Community Survey to the Washington Group disability measures," co-authored by Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology, was published in Disability and Health Journal.

December 6, 2023

Yingyi Ma Examines Declining Enrollment of Chinese Students in the US in Brookings Article

"During my conversations with Tsinghua University faculty and students regarding whether they would consider studying in the United States, they expressed fear and anxiety about what they perceive as 'a hostile America' toward China—specifically, the U.S. policies targeting Chinese talent and the broader anti-China rhetoric," Yingyi Ma, professor of sociology.

December 6, 2023

Gender Differences in Adults with ADHD

Ashely Schiros, Andrew S. London, Kevin M. Antshel

"Gender Differences in Adults with ADHD," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Andrew London, was published in the Clinical Handbook of ADHD Assessment and Treatment Across the Lifespan.

November 28, 2023

Benanav Speaks With Vox About the Politics of Leisure Time

In the glory days of the American labor movement, when unions were strong and wages rose alongside productivity, “organized workers could cash that out as more free time,” says Aaron Benanav, assistant professor of sociology. “But for decades, workers haven’t even been getting that choice because, for the most part, productivity growth has ended up as higher profits and more inequality.”

November 24, 2023

Landes Comments on US Census Bureau Changes to Survey Question About Disability in Science Article

“Disabled people are already underserved,” says Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology. Altering the way the Census Bureau gathers disability statistics, he argues, will generate “inaccurate information.”

November 18, 2023

Purser Weighs In on Why Hospital Workers and Pharmacists Are Striking in BBC Article

"Pharmacy workers at CVS or Walgreens have been saddled with this exacerbation of workplace duties without a corollary growth of staffing," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. "They feel very overwhelmed, very overburdened, very overworked. And none of that has come along with increased wages, either."

November 14, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Silverstein Quoted in New York Times Article on Seniors and Housing Decisions

“Among older people there is a reluctance to project negativity into their future,” says Merril Silverstein, professor and chair of sociology. “There’s research that they tend to put on rose-colored glasses about things like their own aging trajectory so it’s keeping up their ego integrity to want to be independent and stay in their home.”

November 12, 2023

See related: Aging, Housing, United States

RSF Grant Supports Research on Youth Poverty, Housing and International Migration

Maxwell sociologist Sean J. Drake is exploring the neighborhood and school experiences of refugee and other migrant youth in Syracuse and New York City.

October 27, 2023

Sandwiched in Later Life: Consequences for Individuals’ Well-Being, Variation Across Welfare Regimes

Marco Albertini, Noah Lewin-Epstein, Merril Silverstein, Aviad Tur-Sinai

"Becoming sandwiched in later life: Consequences for individuals’ well-being and variation across welfare regimes," co-authored by Professor and Chair of Sociology Merril Silverstein, was published in The Journals of Gerontology.

October 23, 2023

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