Skip to content

Sociology News & Events

Benanav Discusses Latest Tech Company Layoffs in TIME Article

January 23, 2023

“When interest rates were very low, companies basically had endless money—and investors were telling them to focus on growth, not profitability,” says Aaron Benanav, assistant professor of sociology. “But because interest rates are rising, there’s a shift from big investors to say, ‘No, now you really have to focus on profitability.’ And the big way to do that is through cuts.”

Purser Weighs in on New York’s Minimum Wage Increase in WAER Article

January 17, 2023

"Because what we have been experiencing in recent years has been really historic levels of in terms of increase of the cost of living," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. "And so this increased minimum wage doesn't reflect what we have all been experiencing, which is the rising cost of living."

See related: Income, Labor, New York State

Maxwell Students, Faculty Among SOURCE and Honors Grant Recipients

January 13, 2023

Eleven Maxwell School students have been awarded grants from the Syracuse Office of Undergraduate Research and Creative Engagement (SOURCE) and the Renée Crown University Honors Program. The awards provide up to $7,500 in support for original undergraduate research projects.

Purser Talks to ABC News About the Nurse Strike in New York City

January 11, 2023

"Nurses are really bargaining for the collective good. They are putting, first and foremost, patients' safety above all else and that was the breaking point—they've been working under less-than-ideal conditions that jeopardized the safety of patients," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. 

Socioeconomic Determinants of Anticipated and Actual Caregiving for Older Adults in India

January 9, 2023

"Socioeconomic Determinants of Anticipated and Actual Caregiving for Older Adults in India," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Janet Wilmoth, was published in the International journal of Aging and Human Development.

See related: Aging, Child & Elder Care, India

Landes Speaks with Academic Minute About the COVID-19 Burden on People with Disabilities

January 4, 2023

"There is a well-documented history in the U.S. of marginalizing people with IDD (intellectual or developmental disability). Our hope is that we will not add to that history, but will take the necessary steps to ensure that people with IDD are provided the opportunity to live and thrive in the midst of the ongoing pandemic," says Landes, associate professor of sociology.

See related: Civil Rights, COVID-19

Montez Quoted in Washington Post Article on Politics, Policy and Increasing Mortality Rates

December 28, 2022

University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez says “state policy knobs are a lever that we could use to really turn this country around and stop this alarming—just horrible when you think about it—increase in the risk of dying before age 65.”

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Kriesberg Examines US Division, Political Partisanship and Civic Disorder in New Book

December 20, 2022

Louis Kriesberg, Maxwell Professor Emeritus of Social Conflict Studies, has written a new book, “Fighting Better: Constructive Conflicts in America” (Oxford University Press, 2022) that examines the division, political partisanship and civic disorder in the United States. 

See related: Government, United States

As a New Leader Takes the Helm, South Asia Center Receives Over $1 Million in Federal Grants

December 19, 2022

Prema Kurien was named director of the center as it received funding from the U.S. Department of Education.

COVID Research Project Garners up to $2.2 Million From the National Institutes of Health

December 12, 2022

Associate Professor Emily Wiemers is the principal investigator of the team that includes her Maxwell School colleague, Marc A. Garcia. 

Greene Talks to PBS NewsHour About Reentry Programs for Transgender Women

December 5, 2022

"No trans women that I formally interviewed or met in the course of my field research wanted to or felt safe in men's housing programs," says Joss Greene, assistant professor of sociology. 

Prescription Opioid Resiliency and Vulnerability: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Case Study

November 28, 2022

"Prescription Opioid Resiliency and Vulnerability: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Case Study," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in American Journal of Criminal Justice.

See related: Addiction, Health Policy

Yingyi Ma Quoted in South China Morning Post Article on China Sending Students to US Universities

November 23, 2022

Chinese students do not necessarily come to the U.S. because they love America or are interested in it, Ma tells South China Morning Post. "They want to get American degrees," she says, and use them to get better jobs back home.

See related: China, Education, United States

Landes Piece on COVID’s Impact on Immunocompromised People Published by Hastings Center

November 22, 2022

"Moving On from Covid? Immunocompromised People Can’t," written by Associate Professor of Sociology Scott Landes, was published by the Hastings Center.

Monnat and Montez Talk to US News About Their Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates

November 2, 2022

“State policies, which have been relatively ignored in research on explanations for U.S. mortality trends, turn out to be really important for understanding geographic disparities in mortality,” Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology, tells U.S. News & World Report.

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Research on Racial Disparities in Education by Professors Drake, Shi and Zhu Cited in NY Times

November 1, 2022

The work of Sean Drake, assistant professor of sociology, Ying Shi, assistant professor of public administration and international affairs, and Maria Zhu, assistant professor of economics, was referenced in the article, "Asian American Students Face Bias, but It’s Not What You Might Think."

Montez Discusses New Research on Link Between Policy and Mortality Rates With NBC News, USA Today

October 28, 2022

If states had adopted liberal policies across the board, University Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and her co-authors calculated that 171,030 lives would have been saved in 2019 alone; on the flip side, conservative policies in all states would have led to an additional 217,635 working-age deaths.

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

U.S. state policy contexts and mortality of working-age adults

October 27, 2022

"U.S. state policy contexts and mortality of working-age adults," co-authored by sociologists Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat, was published by PLoS ONE.

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Monnat Comments on Increase in US Suicide Rates in Grid Article

October 14, 2022

“There might be a small drop in one or two years, but the long-term trend has been an increase,” says Shannon Monnat, professor of sociology. She was interviewed for the Grid article, "U.S. suicide rates rose again in 2021, ending a brief decline during the covid pandemic."

Monnat Research on Mortality Trends Featured in New York Times Article

October 6, 2022

Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat was also interviewed for the story, "‘There Are Two Americas Now: One With a B.A. and One Without’." 

See related: Health Policy, Longevity

Explore by:

Sociology Department
302 Maxwell Hall