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Sociology News & Events

Garcia, Lerner Center Research on COVID and the Latino Mortality Advantage Cited in NBC News Story

May 16, 2022

A recent Lerner Center research brief co-authored by Assistant Professor of Sociology Marc Garcia was cited in the NBC News article, "Covid-19 narrows long-standing Latino mortality advantage, study finds."

Sociologist Shannon Monnat to Lead Center for Policy Research

May 16, 2022

A demographer and sociologist whose work focuses on population health will serve as the next director of the Center for Policy Research (CPR), the oldest interdisciplinary social science research program at the Maxwell School. Shannon Monnat, Lerner Chair for Public Health Promotion and professor of sociology, will begin the position on July 1, 2022. 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the Age Pattern of Adult Mortality

April 27, 2022

"Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the Age Pattern of Adult Mortality," written by sociologists Andrew London and Scott Landes, was published in Biodemography and Social Biology.

Maxwell Faculty, Staff and Students Honored at 2022 One University Awards Ceremony

April 27, 2022

The 2022 One University Awards were held Friday, April 22, in Hendricks Chapel. The annual event honors members of the Syracuse University community who are making a difference through academics, scholarship, creative work and dedicated service.

See related: Awards & Honors

Purser Appointed Co-Director of Lender Center for Social Justice

April 19, 2022

Provost Gretchen Ritter announced that Gretchen W. Purser, associate professor of sociology in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, has been appointed co-director of the Lender Center for Social Justice.

Silverstein Comments on Multigenerational Living in New York Times Article

March 31, 2022

Merril Silverstein, Marjorie Cantor Endowed Professor in Aging, was quoted in the New York Times article, "The Nuclear Family Is No Longer the Norm. Good."

Maxwell Advocate Award Posthumously Honors Sociologist, Champion of Equity

March 25, 2022
The work of the late Charles V. Willie extended well beyond academia, as he applied his scholarship to issues of equity and social justice. 

See related: Awards & Honors

Monnat Study on Support from Adult Children, Parent Health Published in JRSS

March 11, 2022

"Support from Adult Children and Parental Health in Rural America," co-authored by Associate Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in the Journal of Rural Social Sciences.

Landes Weighs in on CDC Recognizing People with IDD Are at Higher Risk of COVID in Disability Scoop

March 7, 2022

Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology, was quoted in the Disability Scoop article, "CDC Adds IDD To List Of Conditions At Increased Risk From COVID-19."

Ackerman Examines Two Nationalist Insurrections to Explain Origin of the Mass Party in New Book

March 3, 2022
Edwin Ackerman examines two nationalist insurrections that were largely composed of a peasant-base in Mexico in 1921 and Bolivia in 1952 in his new book, "Origins of the Mass Party: Dispossession and the Party-Form in Mexico and Bolivia in Comparative Perspective" (University of Oxford Press, 2021).  

Drake Addresses Long-Standing Problems of Educational Inequality in New Book

February 25, 2022

In his new book, "Academic Apartheid: Race and the Criminalization of Failure in an American Suburb" (University of California Press, 2022), Sean J. Drake looks at how race and class intersect, contributing to educational inequality and modern school segregation. 

Racial-ethnic inequities in age at death among adults with/without IDD

February 23, 2022

Scott Landes and Janet Wilmoth identify differences in racial-ethnic inequities in mortality between adults with/without intellectual and developmental disability in their study published in Preventive Medicine.

Monnat's Research Cited in NY Times Article on Trump, Canadian Truckers' Protests

February 22, 2022
A study co-authored by Associate Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat was cited in the New York Times article, "There’s a Reason Trump Loves the Truckers." 

Lutz Examines How Social Contexts and Culture Affect Parenting Decisions in New Book

February 17, 2022
Amy Lutz, associate professor of sociology at the Maxwell School, is the co-author of a new book, "Parenting in Privilege or Peril: How Social Inequality Enables or Derails the American Dream" (Teachers College Press, 2021). The book examines how social contexts and culture affect parenting decisions. 

Perceived access to PrEP as a critical step in engagement

January 26, 2022
Andrew London and John McPeak assess preferences for and barriers to PrEP access in the U.S. in a study published in PLoS One.

In Memoriam: Charles Willie G’57, H’92, A Champion for Social Justice

January 18, 2022
The legacy of alumnus Charles Vert Willie G’57, H’92 will forever be tied to that of his friend Martin Luther King Jr., making Willie’s passing a week before MLK Day 2022 especially poignant. 

Tracking COVID’s Toll

December 21, 2021

Pandemic research by Maxwell faculty and students is shaping policy and perception on everything from aging to opioid addiction.

Grant Funds Syracuse Housing Research

December 17, 2021
Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology at the Maxwell School, is part of a three-member team that has received a $350,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to investigate how building local power among tenants can enhance community health and well-being.

London study looks at COVID-19 through lenses of HIV, epidemic history

December 2, 2021
"'It’s history in the making all around us': examining COVID-19 through the lenses of HIV and epidemic history," co-authored by Professor Andrew London, was published in Culture, Health & Sexuality. The study aims to determine how men living in the USA make sense of COVID-19 in the light of their collective knowledge and/or memories of the HIV pandemic, and provides evidence regarding the social organization of a contemporary pandemic and how individuals perceive and guard against risk, assign responsibility for virus transmission and acquisition, and navigate the threat of a potentially deadly infection.

Yingyi Ma Discusses Experiences of Chinese Students in US

October 6, 2021
Yingyi Ma, associate professor of sociology and director of Asian/Asian American Studies, took part in a virtual program, "People-to-People Exchange: Chinese Students in the U.S.," hosted by the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations (NCUSCR).

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