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Sociology News & Events

Yingyi Ma Examines Declining Enrollment of Chinese Students in the US in Brookings Article

"During my conversations with Tsinghua University faculty and students regarding whether they would consider studying in the United States, they expressed fear and anxiety about what they perceive as 'a hostile America' toward China—specifically, the U.S. policies targeting Chinese talent and the broader anti-China rhetoric," Yingyi Ma, professor of sociology.

December 6, 2023

Gender Differences in Adults with ADHD

Ashely Schiros, Andrew S. London, Kevin M. Antshel

"Gender Differences in Adults with ADHD," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Andrew London, was published in the Clinical Handbook of ADHD Assessment and Treatment Across the Lifespan.

November 28, 2023

Benanav Speaks With Vox About the Politics of Leisure Time

In the glory days of the American labor movement, when unions were strong and wages rose alongside productivity, “organized workers could cash that out as more free time,” says Aaron Benanav, assistant professor of sociology. “But for decades, workers haven’t even been getting that choice because, for the most part, productivity growth has ended up as higher profits and more inequality.”

November 24, 2023

Landes Comments on US Census Bureau Changes to Survey Question About Disability in Science Article

“Disabled people are already underserved,” says Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology. Altering the way the Census Bureau gathers disability statistics, he argues, will generate “inaccurate information.”

November 18, 2023

Purser Weighs In on Why Hospital Workers and Pharmacists Are Striking in BBC Article

"Pharmacy workers at CVS or Walgreens have been saddled with this exacerbation of workplace duties without a corollary growth of staffing," says Gretchen Purser, associate professor of sociology. "They feel very overwhelmed, very overburdened, very overworked. And none of that has come along with increased wages, either."

November 14, 2023

See related: Income, Labor, United States

Silverstein Quoted in New York Times Article on Seniors and Housing Decisions

“Among older people there is a reluctance to project negativity into their future,” says Merril Silverstein, professor and chair of sociology. “There’s research that they tend to put on rose-colored glasses about things like their own aging trajectory so it’s keeping up their ego integrity to want to be independent and stay in their home.”

November 12, 2023

See related: Aging, Housing, United States

RSF Grant Supports Research on Youth Poverty, Housing and International Migration

Maxwell sociologist Sean J. Drake is exploring the neighborhood and school experiences of refugee and other migrant youth in Syracuse and New York City.

October 27, 2023

Sandwiched in Later Life: Consequences for Individuals’ Well-Being, Variation Across Welfare Regimes

Marco Albertini, Noah Lewin-Epstein, Merril Silverstein, Aviad Tur-Sinai

"Becoming sandwiched in later life: Consequences for individuals’ well-being and variation across welfare regimes," co-authored by Professor and Chair of Sociology Merril Silverstein, was published in The Journals of Gerontology.

October 23, 2023

Senior Erykah Pasha Strives to Uplift Others

They have taken advantage of opportunities to learn and help others, including work with the local organization Layla’s Got You.

October 20, 2023

Montez Cited in Washington Post Article on the Impact of States’ Policies on Life Expectancy

The differences in state policies directly correlate to those years lost, said Jennifer Karas Montez, director of the Center for Aging and Policy Studies and author of several papers that describe the connection between politics and life expectancy.

October 17, 2023

Maxwell Sociologists Honored and Elected to Leadership Positions at ASA Annual Meeting

Prema Kurien and Janet M. Wilmoth received awards, and several faculty colleagues were elected to roles in the American Sociological Association. 

October 4, 2023

Health Equity for People With IDD Requires Vast Improvements to Data Collection

Scott D. Land, Margaret A. Turk

"Health equity for people with intellectual and developmental disability requires vast improvements to data collection: Lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic," co-authored by Associate Professor of Sociology Scott Landes, was published in Disability and Health Journal.

October 2, 2023

Did Gender Egalitarianism Weaken Religiosity in Baby Boom Women? A Developmental-Historical Approach

Merril Silverstein, Woosang Hwang, Jeung Hyun Kim, Maria T Brown

"Did Gender Egalitarianism Weaken Religiosity in Baby Boom Women? A Developmental-Historical Approach," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Merril Silverstein, was published in Sociology of Religion.

October 2, 2023

Maxwell Sociologists Receive $1.8 Million From the NIA to Study Midlife Health and Mortality

The research team led by Jennifer Karas Montez and Shannon Monnat hopes to better understand how state policies and local economic conditions impact health and mortality rates.

September 21, 2023

Benanav Talks to CNBC About AI and the Future of Work

“I think about academics having to write grants all the time,” says Aaron Benanav, assistant professor of sociology, as an example. Those can be formulaic and would take far less time with the help of a machine. In programming, it’s helping engineers “write up basic outlines of code or sometimes like whole sections of code,” he says. 

September 18, 2023

Kurien Quoted in Texas Standard Article on Immigrant Churches in Diaspora Network, US Church Growth

Prema Kurien, professor of sociology, says there is a logical reason why immigrant groups exhibit higher rates of religiosity. “Immigration and relocation from a familiar context to something completely unfamiliar is a theologizing experience,” Kurien says. “It raises existential questions—things that people don’t think about when they are in their home country with a familiar community.”

September 14, 2023

Explaining the US Rural Disadvantage in COVID-19 Case and Death Rates During the Delta-Omicron Surge

Malia Jones, Mahima Bhattar, Emma Henning, Shannon M. Monnat

"Explaining the U.S. rural disadvantage in COVID-19 case and Death rates during the Delta-Omicron surge: The role of politics, vaccinations, population health, and social determinants," co-authored by Professor of Sociology Shannon Monnat, was published in Social Science & Medicine.

September 6, 2023

Maxwell School Announces Recent Faculty Additions

The Maxwell School welcomes 16 new faculty members for the 2023-2024 academic year.
August 31, 2023

Research by Gallo-Cruz Cited in Salon Article on the Human Costs of Global Warming

Citing the work of organizations like Global Witness in conflict zones worldwide, Selina Gallo-Cruz, associate professor of sociology, points out that a significant part of the violence on this planet comes from the North's "extraction of natural resources through mining or deforestation—palm oil plantations are a big one—and mega-, mega-agricultural projects," all of which lead to "outbreaks of very violent conflict."

July 18, 2023

Students, Faculty Receive Spring 2023 SOURCE and Honors Research Grants

The awards support undergraduate research projects.

July 14, 2023

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