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Gadarian Examines the Implications of Politicizing the Pandemic in New Book

October 18, 2022

“Pandemic Politics: The Deadly Toll of Partisanship in the Age of COVID," co-authored by Professor of Political Science Shana Kushner Gadarian, draws on a wealth of new data on public opinion to show how pandemic politics has touched all aspects of Americans’ lives.

Bhan Documents Growing Critical Kashmir Studies Scholarship in New Book

October 7, 2022

This handbook, co-edited by Mona Bhan, associate professor of anthropology and Ford-Maxwell Professor of South Asian Studies, politicizes discourses of nationalism, patriotism, democracy, and liberalism, and it questions how these dominant globalist imaginaries and discourses serve institutionalized power, create hegemony, and normalize domination.

Kriesberg, Dayton Explain How Political and Social Conflicts Can Be Waged Constructively in New Book

September 29, 2022

In their book, Louis Kriesberg, Maxwell Professor Emeritus of Social Conflict Studies, and political science alumnus Bruce W. Dayton ’99 Ph.D., senior research associate in the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration, explain how large-scale political and social conflicts can be waged more constructively, with more positive consequences and fewer destructive consequences for those involved.

Maxwell Faculty, Graduate Students Contribute to New Social Sciences Book

June 2, 2022

Faculty members Robert Rubinstein and Sandra Lane are among the co-editors and contributors to this handbook, which investigates the social contexts of health—including food and nutrition, race, class, ethnicity, trauma, gender, mental illness and the environment—to explain the complicated nature of illness. 

Mark Monmonier's Book Traces the Invention of the Clock System

April 7, 2022

Monmonier, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Geography and the Environment, follows John Byron Plato's path from farmer in his mid-30s to inventor of several inventions including the “Clock System,” which assigned addresses to rural residences without house numbers.

Ackerman Examines Two Nationalist Insurrections to Explain Origin of the Mass Party in New Book

March 3, 2022
Edwin Ackerman examines two nationalist insurrections that were largely composed of a peasant-base in Mexico in 1921 and Bolivia in 1952 in his new book, "Origins of the Mass Party: Dispossession and the Party-Form in Mexico and Bolivia in Comparative Perspective" (University of Oxford Press, 2021).  

Drake Addresses Long-Standing Problems of Educational Inequality in New Book

February 25, 2022

In his new book, "Academic Apartheid: Race and the Criminalization of Failure in an American Suburb" (University of California Press, 2022), Sean J. Drake looks at how race and class intersect, contributing to educational inequality and modern school segregation. 

Lutz Examines How Social Contexts and Culture Affect Parenting Decisions in New Book

February 17, 2022
Amy Lutz, associate professor of sociology at the Maxwell School, is the co-author of a new book, "Parenting in Privilege or Peril: How Social Inequality Enables or Derails the American Dream" (Teachers College Press, 2021). The book examines how social contexts and culture affect parenting decisions. 

Murphy examines race and borders in the colonial Caribbean in new book

December 18, 2021
In her new book, "The Creole Archipelago: Race and Borders in the Colonial Caribbean" (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021), Tessa Murphy, assistant professor of history, traces how generations of Indigenous Kalinagos, free and enslaved Africans and settlers from a variety of European nations used maritime routes to forge connections that spanned the eastern Caribbean.

Dimitar Gueorguiev's New Book Explores How Chinese Communist Party Has Maintained Power

November 9, 2021

Gueorguiev, associate professor of political science, argues that the key to the Communist Party’s longevity is its ability to integrate authoritarian control with social inclusion through modern telecommunications technologies. 

New Book by Armstrong Offers Insights About Harriet Tubman’s Life Following Self-Emancipation

June 21, 2021

Douglas Armstrong, professor of anthropology, has published a new book, “The Archeology of Harriet Tubman’s Life in Freedom” (Syracuse University Press, 2022). 

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