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Maxwell / Centers, Institutes, and Initiatives
  • Faculty Research

  • The 150-plus faculty members and roughly 800 graduate students are responsible for research that is influential and innovative.

    Much of that research is conducted within the School’s research centers and institutes, but much is also completed by individuals working within their disciplines, toward purely scholarly ends. Similarly, much of Maxwell’s research is externally funded, and yet, much leads to the published books and articles that mark the progress of concepts and ideas in the academy.

    In a typical year, Maxwell faculty members publish dozens of books and monographs and hundreds of book chapters and journal articles. Their work provides up-to-date material for the classroom.

    It is one of the great distinctions of the Maxwell School that an institution so widely praised for its professional programs is, in fact, a home for esteemed research and scholarship across so a wide range of disciplines.      

  • Research News

    Ma examines science identity change, college major shifts in new study

    "Math and Science Identity Change and Paths into and out of STEM: Gender and Racial Disparities," co-authored by Associate Professor of Sociology Yingyi Ma, was published in Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World. Using data from the Pathways through College Study, Ma and Ph.D. candidate Shiyang Xiao '20 M.A. (Econ) find that science identity changes matter more than math identity changes in their association with the decision to switch majors. Most notably, underrepresented racial minority women are the most vulnerable in terms of decreasing science identity and the associated probabilities of leaking out of STEM.

    4/30/2021

     

    Shana Kushner Gadarian is a 2021 Carnegie Fellow

    Shana Kushner Gadarian, associate professor and chair of political science, has been named a 2021 Carnegie Fellow. As recipients of the so-called “brainy award,” each Carnegie Fellow receives a grant of up to $200,000, making it possible to devote significant time to research, writing and publishing in the humanities and social sciences. The award is for a period of up to two years, and its anticipated result is a book or major study. Gadarian’s Carnegie-funded project, “Pandemic Politics: How COVID-19 Revealed the Depths of Partisan Polarization,” will investigate the long-term impacts of the pandemic on health behaviors and evaluations of government performance.

    4/28/2021

     

    Lopoo, Wolf cited in The Atlantic article on declining fertility rates

    The experiences of developed countries, taken together, suggest that small cash transfers or short parental leaves are unlikely to significantly increase fertility rates, says Professor Leonard Lopoo. Benefits that remove significant financial obstacles—the cost of child care, medical bills for prenatal care and giving birth, or college tuition—and prevent parents from having to leave their jobs are most likely to persuade someone to have a child, he says. Lopoo was interviewed for The Atlantic article, "The Danger of Shortchanging Parents." "Fiscal Externalities of Becoming a Parent," a study co-authored by Professor Douglas Wolf was also cited in the article (linked in the sixth paragraph).

    4/26/2021

     

    A Climate for Change - Ethan Coffel

    Ethan Coffel, assistant professor of geography and the environment, is principal investigator on a three-year National Science Foundation (NSF) grant project exploring the link between climate and agricultural change—a process known as the crop-climate feedback cycle. By observing different crop-climate feedback cycles, he can assess the future risk of climate-driven food insecurity as well as the potential for economic losses in agricultural regions. “I want to develop adaptation strategies to increase the climate resilience of food production,” says Coffel.

    4/26/2021

     

    Heflin research on housing insecurity cited in Common Dreams article

    Professor Colleen Heflin's co-authored Lerner Center research brief, "Housing Insecurity During the Coronavirus Response," was cited in the Common Dreams article, "New York to Offer Undocumented Migrants Up to $15,600 in Pandemic Relief." Heflin and co-author Lauryn Quick found that from late April through mid-July, nearly one in five households in New York state and 22% in the New York City metropolitan area reported not being able to afford last month's housing payment.

    4/19/2021

     

    Faricy research cited in Forbes article on American Rescue Plan

    "The Other Side of the Coin: Public Opinion toward Social Tax Expenditures" (Russel Sage Foundation, 2021), co-authored by Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science, was cited in the Forbes article, "Making The Most Of A Crisis, Biden Links Recovery And Tax Reform." Faricy and co-author Christopher Ellis (Bucknell University) have judged the American Rescue Plan to be "the largest expansion to the American welfare state in a generation."

    4/12/2021

     

    Sultana study examines overlapping crises of climate change, COVID-19

    "Climate change, COVID-19, and the co-production of injustices: a feminist reading of overlapping crises," authored by Farhana Sultana, was published in Social & Cultural Geography. Sultana, associate professor of geography and the environment, argues that an intersectional analysis of the overlapping but uneven global crises produced by climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates the importance of investigating and addressing them simultaneously through a feminist lens. This allows for a more nuanced understanding of the co-production of injustices structurally, materially and discursively.

    4/7/2021

     

    Wiemers study on COVID-19 risk factors, protective behaviors published

    "Association Between Risk Factors for Complications From COVID-19, Perceived Chances of Infection and Complications, and Protective Behavior in the US," co-authored by Associate Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Emily Wiemers, was published in JAMA Network Open. In their cross-sectional survey study, the authors found that adults with risk factors for COVID-19 complications reported higher perceived susceptibility to complications. They also found that during common activities, including visiting with friends, the majority of adults, including the highly susceptible, did not consistently wear masks.

    4/6/2021

     

    Monnat examines opioid misuse, family structure in new study

    "Opioid misuse and family structure: Changes and continuities in the role of marriage and children over two decades," co-authored by Lerner Chair for Health Promotion Shannon Monnat, was published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence. The authors found that married young adults and those with children have a lower probability of prescription opioid misuse and heroin use.

    3/26/2021

     

    Rasmussen discusses the founding fathers’ concern for America’s future

    In his new book, “Fears of a Setting Sun: The Disillusionment of America’s Founders” (Princeton University Press), Syracuse political science professor Dennis Rasmussen examines why many of America’s founding fathers—George Washington, John Adams, and Thomas Jefferson, to name a few—were concerned about America’s future. Today, it seems as if many of their greatest fears have been realized.

    3/11/2021

     

    Landes talks to CBS about lack of COVID reporting on people with IDD

    Scott Landes, associate professor of sociology and co-author of a recent study that found that those with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) living in group homes may be more likely to die from COVID-19, says the pandemic has exposed shortcomings in the medical community "as we've made decisions on who we collect data on, what we report, who we emphasize, who gets prioritization. I think on a philosophical, underlying level, it's because we have failed to value this group," he says. Read more in the CBS News article, "COVID cases in New York group homes under scrutiny after nursing home controversy."

    3/11/2021

     

    Coffel discusses his thermal power and climate research in ESA journal

    With electricity demand set to soar—thanks to the transition to an all‐electric future and the rising use of air conditioning globally—the climate vulnerability of thermal plants is a major risk that needs to be accounted for, says Ethan Coffel, assistant professor of geography and the environment. He discusses his recent study on thermal power and climate change in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, a journal of the Ecological Society of America (ESA).

    3/4/2021

     

    Five Maxwell scholars contribute to aging studies handbook

    Four professors and a doctoral student from the Maxwell School’s Department of Sociology and Department of Public Administration and International Affairs have contributed to the completely revised ninth edition of the “Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences” (Elsevier Academic Press). In three chapters, Maxwell scholars explore a range of issues related to aging and the life course, including: the link between education and adult health, the life-course consequences of women’s direct and indirect ties to the military, and how intergenerational family ties shape well-being over the life course.

    3/1/2021

     

    Schwartz talks to Research Minutes about impact of special education

    Amy Ellen Schwartz, Daniel Patrick Moynihan Chair in Public Affairs, recently co-authored a study on the impact of special education on students with learning disabilities. On this episode of Research Minutes, "Does Special Education Improve Student Outcomes," she discusses her team's findings—including new evidence on student outcomes, special education classification and impacts for various student groups—and some potential national implications for special education policy, practice and future research.

    2/26/2021

     

    Young study on coproduction, digital service delivery published in PMR

    "The impact of technological innovation on service delivery: social media and smartphone integration in a 311 system," authored by Assistant Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Matthew Young, was published in Public Management Review. Young analyzes whether technological changes to coproduction systems improve effectiveness, and whether improvements come at the expense of equity.

    2/24/2021

     

    Lambright study on globalizing public administration published

    "Charting three trajectories for globalizing public administration research and theory," co-authored by Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Harry Lambright, was published in the Asia Pacific Journal of Public Administration. Lambright and his co-authors highlight three trajectories. The first is to build generalizable theories to enhance global applicability. The second trajectory is to be more inclusive of diverse perspectives in the mainstream of public administration scholarship. The final trajectory is to scale up the lens of inquiry beyond the nation-state to include global governance actors and organizations.

    2/23/2021

     

    Carboni's research on giving circles cited in Nonprofit Quarterly

    A recent study co-authored by Julia Carboni, associate professor of public administration and international affairs, found significant support for the idea that giving circles can be effective tools for economic and racial justice: "In the current context of philanthropic and wider societal attention to empowering marginalized groups, supporting [giving circles] presents philanthropy with a way to support and expand social justice and equity in philanthropy." The study, along with previous research conducted by Carboni on giving circles, was cited in the Nonprofit Quarterly article, "Can Giving Circles Democratize Philanthropy?"

    2/22/2021

     

    Monnat study on US policies, rural population health published in PPAR

    "The Unique Impacts of U.S. Social and Health Policies on Rural Population Health and Aging," co-authored by Lerner Chair for Public Health Promotion Shannon Monnat, Lerner Postdoctoral Scholar Danielle Rhubart, and Lerner Graduate Fellow Claire Pendergrast, was published in Public Policy & Aging Report. The authors discuss three large, national policies/programs as exemplars of how policies differentially affect population health and aging in rural versus urban populations: the Older Americans Act, the Affordable Care Act, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. They also discuss implications for policymakers and identify promising areas for research on the spatially disparate impacts of policies on population health and aging.

    2/12/2021

     

    Rosenthal cited in Financial Post article on commercial real estate

    A recent paper co-authored by Professor Stuart Rosenthal, was cited in the Financial Post article, "Why the automobile has become a kingmaker for downtown commercial real estate." The authors' empirical analysis of 56,765 commercial leases signed between January 2019 and October 2020 across 109 urban centers in the United States revealed that commercial real estate in the urban core, especially in cities where public transit accounts for a sizable share of work trips, has indeed lost value.

    2/12/2021

     

    Abdelaaty study on human rights, refugee protection published in IJHR

    "The relationship between human rights and refugee protection: an empirical analysis," authored by Assistant Professor of Political Science Lamis Abdelaaty, was published in the International Journal of Human Rights. Abdelaaty examined the relationship between a government's respect for the rights of its own citizens and that government's regard for refugee rights and found that the relationship between citizens’ rights and refugee rights is modified by economic conditions and the size of the refugee population.

    2/12/2021

     

    Liu examines how firm integration decisions are made in new study

    "The missing option in firm boundary decisions," authored by Assistant Professor of Economics Mengxiao Liu, was published in European Economic Review. Liu argues that both the integrating firm and the integrated firm matter in integration decisions. She proposes a method to incorporate both firms into the integration decision and finds support for this method in a novel dataset.

    2/11/2021

     

    Jolly study on EU's transnational-nationalist dimension published

    "A new divide? Assessing the transnational-nationalist dimension among political parties and the public across the EU," co-authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Seth Jolly and Ph.D. candidate Daniel Jackson, was published in European Union Politics. Jolly and Jackson argue that the transnational-nationalist divide is a useful framework for understanding political conflict over European integration and the recent rise of nationalism across Europe, above and beyond the traditional economic and social left-right dimensions.

    2/11/2021

     

    Baltagi celebrated in special issue of Empirical Economics journal

    Empirical Economics published a special issue to celebrate Distinguished Professor of Economics Badi Baltagi’s myriad contributions to the field of econometrics, as well as his long service to the journal. The influential work carried out by Baltagi during the past four decades or so is recognized in the issue by nineteen peer-reviewed, state-of-the-art articles, written by some of the leading researchers in econometrics. The diversity of the topics covered in "Essays in honor of Professor Badi H. Baltagi" constitutes a testament to the wide-ranging scope of Baltagi's research interests and contributions.

    2/9/2021

     

    Faricy explores public perceptions of welfare via the U.S. tax code

    In their new book, “The Other Side of the Coin: Public Opinion toward Social Tax Expenditures” (Russel Sage Foundation), Christopher Faricy, associate professor of political science, and Bucknell University professor Christopher Ellis examine how public opinion differs between two types of economic aid—direct government assistance vs. indirect assistance in the form of tax subsidies.

    2/9/2021

     

    Griffiths evaluates grievances of secessionist movements in new paper

    "Local conditions and the demand for independence: A dataset of secessionist grievances," co-authored by Associate Professor of Political Science Ryan Griffiths and Ph.D. candidate Angely Martinez, was published in Nations and Nationalism. There are more than 60 secessionist movements around the world, and they all advance arguments for why they deserve independence. In the article, Griffiths and Martinez construct a dataset of secessionist grievances. They develop a set of grievance indicators, specify how they are operationalized and detail how the grievances are categorized and aggregated. They then tally the results for each contemporary movement and discuss the broader patterns.

    2/3/2021

     

    London, Hoy examine same-sex sexuality and divorce risk in new study

    "Same-Sex Sexuality and the Risk of Divorce: Findings from Two National Studies," co-authored by Professor Andrew London and Aaron Hoy '14 M.A. (Soc)/'18 Ph.D. (Soc), was published in the Journal of Homosexuality. London and Hoy use data from the 1992 National Health and Social Life Survey (NHSLS) and the 2011–2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) to examine the likelihood of divorce among the once-married. Specifically, among those who are or were married once and only once to a person of a different sex, they ask whether the components of same-sex sexuality—desire/attraction, behavior, and identity—are associated with an increased risk of divorce, net of demographic and early-life controls.

    2/3/2021

     

    Schwartz discusses her recent special ed study with Hechinger Report

    "They’re closing the gap with their general education peers by about a sixth," says Professor Amy Ellen Schwartz, Daniel Patrick Moynihan Chair in Public Affairs and lead author of the recently published study, "The Effects of Special Education on the Academic Performance of Students with Learning Disabilities." "Their performance [in special ed] jumps up compared to other peers with learning disabilities who are not yet diagnosed" and still part of the general education population, she says. Read more in the Hechinger Report article, "PROOF POINTS: New answers to old questions about special education."

    2/3/2021

     

    Montez quoted in Undark article on state policies, life expectancy

    In a study published in September 2020, Professor Jennifer Karas Montez and her colleagues merged state policy data with life expectancy data for each of the 45 years to see whether there was any association. Their finding: States that implemented more conservative policies were more likely to experience a reduction in life expectancy. "We know states that we can look to: What is Connecticut doing? What did New York state do?" Montez says. "We can also look to the states that are declining and say, 'What did they do wrong?'" Thus, the U.S. offers 50 individual case studies that show how policies are linked to health, Montez says. Read more in the Undark article, "Are Conservative Policies Shortening American Lives?"

    2/2/2021

     

    Himmelreich discusses vaccine verification systems in Brookings piece

    "Building robust and ethical vaccination verification systems," co-authored by Assistant Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs Johannes Himmelreich, was published in Brookings TechStream. "VRV systems present both opportunities and risks in tackling the COVID-19 pandemic," the authors say. "They offer hope of more accurate verification of vaccine status, but they also run the risk of both exacerbating existing health and economic inequalities and introducing significant security and privacy vulnerabilities." The authors argue that VRV systems ought to align with vaccine prioritization decisions, uphold fairness and equity, and be built on trustworthy technology.

    1/28/2021

     

    Landes study on signature authority, cause of death accuracy published

    "Assessing state level variation in signature authority and cause of death accuracy, 2005–2017," co-authored by Associate Professor of Sociology Scott Landes, was published in Preventive Medicine Reports. The authors examined whether variation in death certificate certifier type predicts the accuracy of cause of death reporting in the U.S. Their findings suggest that state-level differences in statutory signature authority may contribute to inaccuracies in U.S. mortality data, especially when considering myriad professional groups that can certify the cause of death.

    1/27/2021

     

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